Best mining rigs and mining PCs for Bitcoin, Ethereum and ...

Help with mining? (I'm new to this)

I'm a noob and have a few questions that hopefully a seasoned veteran in this space can answer to help me get mining ether. My specs - RTX 2080 Super 8GB. Intel i7 7800x @ 3.5ghz. 16gb ram.

  1. Is it worth mining ethereum using a pool on my rig?
  2. Which pool is best for me as of today and what is the address I input into my start.bat file for claymore?
  3. How long running the mining software before I saw any sort of meaningful result in my ether wallet
  4. Can you play online games while the mining software is running or does that ruin chances of making any sort of progress.
  5. What is considered a good hashrate?
  6. Is inputting my wallet adress enough or must I have a 'miner name' - if so, how do I make a name and where do I put it?

Other factors -I'm in 'quarantine' for a few weeks so I use my pc daily anyway and power isnt much of a concern. I live in the UK, I own some bitcoin and ethereum already and thinking about adding to my ether (even by a little) by mining using the pc I aready use daily.

Any help and suggestions are apprecaited! Thanks
submitted by windy1602 to EtherMining [link] [comments]

I earned about 4000% more btc with my android tablet than with a $250 ASIC mini rig setup using GekkoScience Newpac USB miners!

Requirements:
1.) Android Device with access to Google Play Store. *I haven't tried yet but you may be able to use tis on Android TV devces as well by sideloading. If anyone has success before I try, let me know! -Note, I did this with a Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 so its a newer more powerful device. If your android is older, your profts will most likely be less than what I earned but to give a projected range I also tested on my Raspberry Pi 4 running a custom LineageOS rom that doesn't allow the OS to make full use of the Pi's specs and I still got 500 h/s on that with Cloud boost, so about 60% of what my Tab 6 with MUCH Higher Specs does.
**Hey guys. Before I get started i just wanted to be clear about one thing. Yes I have seen those scammy posts sharing "miracle" boosts and fixes. I have a hard time believing stuff online anymore. But this is honestly real. Ill attach photos and explain the whole story and process below. Thanks for taking the time to read and feel free to share any thoughts, concerns, tips, etc*
So last week I finally got started with my first mini rig type mining build. I started getting into crypto about a year ago and it has taken me a long time to even grasp half of the projects out there but its been fun thus far! Anyways my rig was 2 GekkoScience Newpac USB miners, a Moonlander USB miner to pair with an FPGA i already had mining, a 10 port 60W 3.0 USB hub and 2 usb fans. The Newpacs actually are hashing at a combined 280 g/s which is actually better than their reported max hash rate when overclocked. Pleasant surpise and they are simple!! I just wanted to get a moonlander because my fpga already mines on Odocrypt for DGB and I just wanted to experience Scrypt mining and help build the DGB project. The Newpacs are mining BTC though.
After I got everything up and running i checked my payout daily average after 1 week. I averaged .01 a day TOTAL between all three miners with them all perforing ABOVE SPEC!!! I had done research so i knew I wouldnt earn much. More than anything i just wanted to learn. But still. I was kinda surprised in a negative way. Yesterday I actually earned less than .01 Frustrated I went back to scouring the web for new ideas. About a year ago, when II was starting, I saw an app on my iphone called CryptoBrowser that claimed to mine btc on your phone without actually using phone resources using a method of cloud mining. I tried it for a week and quit because I earned like .03 after a ton of use and seemed scammy. Plus my iphone actually would get very hot when doing this so I quit using it as it seemed like a possible scam with all the cryptonight browser mining hacks and malware out there.
Anyways I was on my Galaxy Tab S6 and saw that CryptoBrowser released a "PRO" edition for 3.99 on Google Play. I bought it for Sh*ts and giggles and booted it up. It came with what they called "Cloud Boost" Essentially this is a button you press and it multiplys the estimated hashrate that it gives you device by the number shown on the boost button. (With the purchase of PRO you get one free x10 boost. You can purchase additional boosts to use with other android devices but those are actually pretty pricy. Another x10 boost was like $25 if i remember correctly).
I played with it for about an hour to see if it actually worked like it said it would this time. To my surprise, as i was browsing, my device didnt increase in temperature AT ALL!!!!! I checked my tast manager to confirm and it was indeed true, my memory and usage barely went up. it was giving me an estimated range of 80-105 on the hashrate. Once i pushed the x10 boost button, that went to 800-1150 h/s. I switched my screen to not go to sleep, plugged it to the charge and let it run on the browser page, hashing. When you push the boost button, it runs for 3 hours at the boosted speeds. After that it goes back to normal but if you press the button again, it boosts everything again. There is no limit to how many times you use it. After checking what I earned after 24 hours, I HAD MADE .40 in BTC!!!!! I JUST EARNED OVER 4000% MORE THAN MY $280 MINING RIG EARNED ME!!!! I was blown away. Maybe this was a fluke? I did it again next day. Every 3 hours or so I would push the button again but thats all. Sure enough, .35 that day. Also, it realy BTC. I requested a payout and although it took like 12 hours for them to send me an email stating they had just sent it, I actually did recieve the state amount of BTC within 24 hours in my personal wallet. The fees to send are SUPER LOW!. Like .01
Below I will list the steps I took, along with an explanation of thier "Mining" process on Androids. Reminder, this ONLY WORKS ON ANDROIDS. Also DO NOT use cryptobrowser on a physcal laptop or desktop. I ran it on an old laptop for three days last year and it fried it. It does actually use your hardware on those platforms to mine and it is not efficnet at all as I suspect they prob steal over half of your power for themselves using the REAL RandomX protocol via browser mining which is EXTREMELY INEFFICIENT DONT TRY IT!!
-----How To Do This Yourself:
Cryptotab Browser states the program works on Android devices by estimating what it thinks the hashrate would be for your device specs and siimulates what you would mine in a remote server however you still earn that estimated coin amount. It is not a SHA-256 process or coin that they say is mining, rather it is XMR and they swap that and pay it out to you in BTC Bitcoin. However I know damn well my Tab S6 doesnt hash 80-105 h/s on RandomX because I have done it with a moodified XMRig module i ported to Android. I got 5 h/s a sec if I was getting any hashes at all. But thats besides the point as I still was making money.
Now, when you press that cloud boost button it immediately boosts that hash rate it estimates by the number on the cloud boost. As stated above, you can purchase more boosts and gift them or use them on extra android devices that you may have. Again, they are pricey so I'm not doing that plus it would just mean that I have another device that I have to leave on and open. The boosts come in x2, x4, x6, x8 and x10 variants. Again, they have unlimited uses.
Here is the link to grab yourself CryptoBrowser Pro from CryptoTab. This IS A REFERRAL LINK! This is where I benefit from doing tis tutorial. Like i said, I want to be transparent as this is not a scam but I'm also not doing this out of the love of my heart. Their referral system works in that people that use the donwload the app using your link are your stage 1 referrals. Anytime they are mining, you earn a 15% bonus. So say they mine $.30 one day. You would get paid out an additional $.045 in your own balance (it does not come out of the referred user balance fyi so no worries). Then lets say that referred miner also gets their own referrals. I would get a 10% bonus on whatever THOSE people mine. This goes on and on for like 8 tiers. Each tier the bonus percntage essential halves. So again, I stand to benefit from this but it also is stupid to not make this visible as its WAY CHEAPER, EASIER AND MORE PROFITABLE TO GET BTC USING THIS METHOD THAN IT IS USING ASICS!! THIS EARNS ALMOST AS MUCH BTC AS AN ANTMINER S7 DOES RUNNING 24/7 ONLY WITHOUT THE HUGE ELLECTRICTY BILL AND COSTS!!!!)
Thats it. Again, if you have concerns, let me know or if you have suggestions, other tips, etc... mention those as well!!!
https://cryptotabbrowser.com/8557319
Links to Picture Proof http://imgur.com/gallery/P13bEsB
submitted by Afraid_Balance to earnbitcoin [link] [comments]

I hate my Fucking Mining Rig - Short Story of my mining adventure (Don't really hate it)

Wanted to write a short write up on my journey of Crypto mining for some of the newer people and people who want to get into it. Not trying to discourage anyone from starting, but want to show the progression of a newbie.
So I am a good with computers and learned of Bitcoin when it was about $7 a coin. Laughed at the idea of some computer doing some math and getting some BS currency. Million dollar mistake on my part, but hindsight is always 20/20.
Anyways, Learned about ethereum in May. Bought some at around $180 and bought all the way up to $330. Now to the mining rig. Ran all of the calculations and with a 180 hashrate and 900 watts I was gonna get 6-7 Eth per month. Shit was gonna be profitable in under 3 months. I was gonna be a fucking crypto allstar and be rich as fuck!
Bought all of my parts literally the day before they were nonexistent. Literally bought the last RX480's from Amazon. Here is a list of my parts.
Asrock board Pentium dual core processor 4 Gb of ram 128 gb SSD 1200 watt Rosewill PSU 6 Sata to Molex PCI Risers (Junk) 6 RX480's - 2 Asus Strix, 4 Gigabyte Total cost - Roughly $2,500 (Pennies compared to my future ROI)
Please keep in mind that I am not posting every single miner issue that I ran into such as fucking with Wattman for a few weeks before learning about Trixx and Afterburner.
I've built computers before, so that part wasn't hard. Set everything up and get windows 10 running.
Problem 1 - Computer doesn't see all of the cards. Had to run the drivers a few times and tweak some shit, but got all 6 cards seen.
Miner hurdle (See what I did there) but off to the races. Let's get this bitch running so I can begin planning my retirement.
Get Claymore running, Got Trixx to overclock. Ran my cards at -96, 1200, 2200 fans at 85% (Cause I'm cool like that.) Major stability issues from the start. 1 card (Asus) would crash all the time. Didn't know about the watch dog feature in claymore that would restart my rig when a card crashed. Great feature but my computer would go into this state of having power, but not loading the operating system. Even if it did restart, most of the time claymore would get stuck right before setting the dag's and would just lock up. (Claymore program is awesome by the way, this was my rigs fault)
Could not get this fucking Asus card to stop crashing, even on stock settings. Sent the bitch back RMA style. Asus said something was wrong and sent me a new one.
Awesome, lets get this bitch running. I need to start looking at sick houses in Costa Rica to move to once I am rich as Fuck!
New card makes things better for a few days. Not 100% stable but better. Go to vegas for a driving thing (Race cars - Future rich guy stuff) and this mechanical demon starts crashing every few hours. Luckily I had Google remote desktop installed so I could log on and restart it or change settings in Trixx. Had to have my GF unplug it and plug it in a few times.
Get back home, fuck with this thing but still random crashes on random cards. Decide it is the PCI risers. Contact seller who will send me some more for free. Slow boat from china took two weeks to get them. They arrive but still some of them are bad. Can't seem to piece together 6 good ones.
Did some research online (Ethereum Forum and Reddit) and decided to get some new style of risers V007 6 Pin to Sata ($70) and they take a month to get here. Plug them all in and they seem to be working much better. Decent stability, But I ain't got time for fucking stock bios. Let's ramp these bitches up and get 32 MHs per card at 600 watts from the wall!
Actually flashing the bios was pretty easy. Thank you 6 pound 9 ounce baby jesus! Long story short had some major stability issues and bounced around with some different timing straps before finding the right ones. (Uber 3.1 for Samsung memory)
So now that we've got some good hash speeds and decent stability let's ramp this private ATM up a little bit by dual mining some Decred. Get dual mining up and running. go to sleep. Wake up the next morning expecting to see myself on the top 100 forbes list. look at my mining rig stats on my phone and see that it died roughly and hour after I went to sleep. Walked toward my rig on the red carpet I had just installed and saw that it was off. Flicked on the light to check it out. No light, WTF? Well I'll be god damned, no power in this whole fucking room. Checked my breakers and sure enough this metal motherfucker tripped my breaker.
No worries though. I'm smart as fuck. I'll just undervolt the shit out of it to get the power down. No way in hell I am just mining ether. I'm going balls to the wall!
As you can expect I had many days of stability issues and tripped breakers. But fuck it, I have homeowners insurance. Burning it to the ground will be covered. (Didn't happen)
My surge protector must be maxed out. Let's buy a bigger one ($25). Same issues.
Fuck Decred, I'll mine SIA, less power. Damn I'm smart.
Rig is more stable with Sia and no tripped breakers. Family medical emergency, have to fly north for a few days. But my rig has been fairly stable and I've got remote desktop if anything goes wrong.
Arrive at airport, check mining stats, rig is down. No worries remote desktop. FUCK, not responsive, no way to remote into the rig and no way to remotely power it off and on.
Lost 4 days of mining. But no worries the difficulty is only, Holy shit that's high! But the price of Ether will make up for it. Ether crashed to the $200's. Oh well, maybe a 10 room house in Costa instead of a 12. No sweat.
Get back to my house and this whore of a machine is just sitting there in a computer coma. It's on but it's not. LED lights glaring at me like "Fuck you human, I ain't doing your stupid math problems!" Fuck you machine, I'm your master. You will do my math problems and you will fucking like it.
My AMD Drivers seem to disappear and the computer goes into a coma like state. Someone on Reddit suggested using the 16.9.2 drivers. Installed and they worked better.
Still random crashing. This shitty PSU must be maxed out. Fuck you PSU, I'm getting you a little brother (EVGA 750 gold $120.)
What do you mean you have to jerry rig a second PSU so it starts without being connected to a motherboard? 2 more hours of my life wasted.
But finally some stability. On my way to being fucking rich. I start looking at people in bentley's and can only laugh. You dumb fuck, I'm gonna be way richer then you. Gonna get a Bugatti for each day of the week.
Damn this difficulty is a bitch. Fuck you Genesis Mining and your pallets of GPU's. You're killing me smalls!
But anyway, on my way to rolling around in my fuck you money!
Fuck you dag file 135, you're killing my future millions. Fuck you dag 138, you dropped me to 167 mhs.
Thank god AMD was there to save my ass with their dope ass blockchain drivers.
download, run DDU, Restart, install drivers, restart, run pixel patch, restart. Perfect, I'm in the money now! I can taste the caviar and champagne already.
Now my cards only run 4 Mhs each. WTF? Try a bunch of the other new drivers. Same shit. Roll back to 16.9.2 and they run fine, just at 167 instead of 180.
Someone on a forum said he had the same issue and did a fresh install of windows 10 and it worked.
So I'll just reformat my SSD (Windows wouldn't do a fresh install within the operating system. Fuck you Bill Gates! Gonna buy you once I get this thing running at 180.)
Format SSD, plug back in, throw in my gangster ass boot USB drive. Ramdisk error. Fuck you Bill Gates! Reformat SSD multiple times, lots of forum reading. Install windows from another computer through command prompt (I'm a coder now as well.) This shit has got to work, I did it in command prompt bitches!
Same fucking error. Now down to an 8 bedroom house in Costa and only 6 Bugattis.
Let's try unplugging my 6 cards and see if that works. Thank you 6 pound 9 ounce baby jesus. Windows installed.
New drivers work and I'm back at 180! Raking in the cash now.
With those speeds my Asus cards crashed. Had to dial down the hashrate to 177.5 for them to be stable. So now going to use some commands in claymore to run the Asus cards at lower speeds while letting my other cards mine harder.
I wrote this to let people know that mining isn't all Bugatti's and caviar. These machines are fickle little cunts that do what they want. No system is the same. So when you post on a forum, people will give you advice on what may work. But what works for them, may not work on your rig. In the end it's up to you to figure it out.
I have spent countless hours after work and on weekends working on this bitch. Hell I've probably spent a few hours just staring at it and thinking about all of the ways I could destroy it slowly.
While I love Etheruem and do value the knowledge gained, I would have made more money just buying Eth and holding.
The guys you see on youtube building sick rigs with crazy specs have been at it for a while. They have worked through the process and know how to solve all of the problems. You have not and will have to work them out on your own.
My whore of a rig will pay for itself soon. But I would suggest that if you want to start building a new mining rig. Check the difficulty chart and make sure you have tons of free time to fuck with it.
I'd post my wallet address for donations since I just saved you $2,600. But I am afraid hackers will steal my monies :)
Hope you enjoyed my mining life story from the past few months.
submitted by dank4us12 to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

Repost - I hate my Fucking Mining rig! (Not really)(Long)

Wanted to write a short write up on my journey of Crypto mining for some of the newer people and people who want to get into it. Not trying to discourage anyone from starting, but want to show the progression of a newbie.
So I am a good with computers and learned of Bitcoin when it was about $7 a coin. Laughed at the idea of some computer doing some math and getting some BS currency. Million dollar mistake on my part, but hindsight is always 20/20.
Anyways, Learned about ethereum in May. Bought some at around $180 and bought all the way up to $330. Now to the mining rig. Ran all of the calculations and with a 180 hashrate and 900 watts I was gonna get 6-7 Eth per month. Shit was gonna be profitable in under 3 months. I was gonna be a fucking crypto allstar and be rich as fuck!
Bought all of my parts literally the day before they were nonexistent. Literally bought the last RX480's from Amazon. Here is a list of my parts.
Asrock board Pentium dual core processor 4 Gb of ram 128 gb SSD 1200 watt Rosewill PSU 6 Sata to Molex PCI Risers (Junk) 6 RX480's - 2 Asus Strix, 4 Gigabyte Total cost - Roughly $2,500 (Pennies compared to my future ROI)
Please keep in mind that I am not posting every single miner issue that I ran into such as fucking with Wattman for a few weeks before learning about Trixx and Afterburner.
I've built computers before, so that part wasn't hard. Set everything up and get windows 10 running.
Problem 1 - Computer doesn't see all of the cards. Had to run the drivers a few times and tweak some shit, but got all 6 cards seen.
Miner hurdle (See what I did there) but off to the races. Let's get this bitch running so I can begin planning my retirement.
Get Claymore running, Got Trixx to overclock. Ran my cards at -96, 1200, 2200 fans at 85% (Cause I'm cool like that.) Major stability issues from the start. 1 card (Asus) would crash all the time. Didn't know about the watch dog feature in claymore that would restart my rig when a card crashed. Great feature but my computer would go into this state of having power, but not loading the operating system. Even if it did restart, most of the time claymore would get stuck right before setting the dag's and would just lock up. (Claymore program is awesome by the way, this was my rigs fault)
Could not get this fucking Asus card to stop crashing, even on stock settings. Sent the bitch back RMA style. Asus said something was wrong and sent me a new one.
Awesome, lets get this bitch running. I need to start looking at sick houses in Costa Rica to move to once I am rich as Fuck!
New card makes things better for a few days. Not 100% stable but better. Go to vegas for a driving thing (Race cars - Future rich guy stuff) and this mechanical demon starts crashing every few hours. Luckily I had Google remote desktop installed so I could log on and restart it or change settings in Trixx. Had to have my GF unplug it and plug it in a few times.
Get back home, fuck with this thing but still random crashes on random cards. Decide it is the PCI risers. Contact seller who will send me some more for free. Slow boat from china took two weeks to get them. They arrive but still some of them are bad. Can't seem to piece together 6 good ones.
Did some research online (Ethereum Forum and Reddit) and decided to get some new style of risers V007 6 Pin to Sata ($70) and they take a month to get here. Plug them all in and they seem to be working much better. Decent stability, But I ain't got time for fucking stock bios. Let's ramp these bitches up and get 32 MHs per card at 600 watts from the wall!
Actually flashing the bios was pretty easy. Thank you 6 pound 9 ounce baby jesus! Long story short had some major stability issues and bounced around with some different timing straps before finding the right ones. (Uber 3.1 for Samsung memory)
So now that we've got some good hash speeds and decent stability let's ramp this private ATM up a little bit by dual mining some Decred. Get dual mining up and running. go to sleep. Wake up the next morning expecting to see myself on the top 100 forbes list. look at my mining rig stats on my phone and see that it died roughly and hour after I went to sleep. Walked toward my rig on the red carpet I had just installed and saw that it was off. Flicked on the light to check it out. No light, WTF? Well I'll be god damned, no power in this whole fucking room. Checked my breakers and sure enough this metal motherfucker tripped my breaker.
No worries though. I'm smart as fuck. I'll just undervolt the shit out of it to get the power down. No way in hell I am just mining ether. I'm going balls to the wall!
As you can expect I had many days of stability issues and tripped breakers. But fuck it, I have homeowners insurance. Burning it to the ground will be covered. (Didn't happen)
My surge protector must be maxed out. Let's buy a bigger one ($25). Same issues.
Fuck Decred, I'll mine SIA, less power. Damn I'm smart.
Rig is more stable with Sia and no tripped breakers. Family medical emergency, have to fly north for a few days. But my rig has been fairly stable and I've got remote desktop if anything goes wrong.
Arrive at airport, check mining stats, rig is down. No worries remote desktop. FUCK, not responsive, no way to remote into the rig and no way to remotely power it off and on.
Lost 4 days of mining. But no worries the difficulty is only, Holy shit that's high! But the price of Ether will make up for it. Ether crashed to the $200's. Oh well, maybe a 10 room house in Costa instead of a 12. No sweat.
Get back to my house and this whore of a machine is just sitting there in a computer coma. It's on but it's not. LED lights glaring at me like "Fuck you human, I ain't doing your stupid math problems!" Fuck you machine, I'm your master. You will do my math problems and you will fucking like it.
My AMD Drivers seem to disappear and the computer goes into a coma like state. Someone on Reddit suggested using the 16.9.2 drivers. Installed and they worked better.
Still random crashing. This shitty PSU must be maxed out. Fuck you PSU, I'm getting you a little brother (EVGA 750 gold $120.)
What do you mean you have to jerry rig a second PSU so it starts without being connected to a motherboard? 2 more hours of my life wasted.
But finally some stability. On my way to being fucking rich. I start looking at people in bentley's and can only laugh. You dumb fuck, I'm gonna be way richer then you. Gonna get a Bugatti for each day of the week.
Damn this difficulty is a bitch. Fuck you Genesis Mining and your pallets of GPU's. You're killing me smalls!
But anyway, on my way to rolling around in my fuck you money!
Fuck you dag file 135, you're killing my future millions. Fuck you dag 138, you dropped me to 167 mhs.
Thank god AMD was there to save my ass with their dope ass blockchain drivers.
download, run DDU, Restart, install drivers, restart, run pixel patch, restart. Perfect, I'm in the money now! I can taste the caviar and champagne already.
Now my cards only run 4 Mhs each. WTF? Try a bunch of the other new drivers. Same shit. Roll back to 16.9.2 and they run fine, just at 167 instead of 180.
Someone on a forum said he had the same issue and did a fresh install of windows 10 and it worked.
So I'll just reformat my SSD (Windows wouldn't do a fresh install within the operating system. Fuck you Bill Gates! Gonna buy you once I get this thing running at 180.)
Format SSD, plug back in, throw in my gangster ass boot USB drive. Ramdisk error. Fuck you Bill Gates! Reformat SSD multiple times, lots of forum reading. Install windows from another computer through command prompt (I'm a coder now as well.) This shit has got to work, I did it in command prompt bitches!
Same fucking error. Now down to an 8 bedroom house in Costa and only 6 Bugattis.
Let's try unplugging my 6 cards and see if that works. Thank you 6 pound 9 ounce baby jesus. Windows installed.
New drivers work and I'm back at 180! Raking in the cash now.
With those speeds my Asus cards crashed. Had to dial down the hashrate to 177.5 for them to be stable. So now going to use some commands in claymore to run the Asus cards at lower speeds while letting my other cards mine harder.
I wrote this to let people know that mining isn't all Bugatti's and caviar. These machines are fickle little cunts that do what they want. No system is the same. So when you post on a forum, people will give you advice on what may work. But what works for them, may not work on your rig. In the end it's up to you to figure it out.
I have spent countless hours after work and on weekends working on this bitch. Hell I've probably spent a few hours just staring at it and thinking about all of the ways I could destroy it slowly.
While I love Etheruem and do value the knowledge gained, I would have made more money just buying Eth and holding.
The guys you see on youtube building sick rigs with crazy specs have been at it for a while. They have worked through the process and know how to solve all of the problems. You have not and will have to work them out on your own.
My whore of a rig will pay for itself soon. But I would suggest that if you want to start building a new mining rig. Check the difficulty chart and make sure you have tons of free time to fuck with it.
I'd post my wallet address for donations since I just saved you $2,600. But I am afraid hackers will steal my monies :)
Hope you enjoyed my mining life story from the past few months.
Edit - Had an Asus card die on me and replaced it with a 1070ti. Nvidia is so much easier!
My rosewill 1200 watt PSU melted the 8 pin port and cable. Had to drop $300 on Amazons last 1300 EVGA.
But my rig has well surpassed it's cost and is still mining away like a champ. Eth for life!
submitted by dank4us12 to EtherMining [link] [comments]

TKEY mining explained. Part 2

TKEY mining explained. Part 2

https://preview.redd.it/2erlvx29qer21.png?width=1500&format=png&auto=webp&s=1e387b209ea03d4b77c74a0e82feeea4324c3d4b


Dear Investors!

We have already announced the official Tkeycoin network release date - April 5, 2019. The days are passing by and the release date is getting closer, meaning it’s high time to talk about the mining of TKEY cryptocurrency.

The first publication on the subject is already available on our Facebook page (just in case you missed it). We talked about the PoW algorithm, Bitcoin mining history and mining hardware evolution, Tkeycoin mining features etc. The article was really informative, and we recommend you to read (or re-read) it before you start the second part.

Today we will talk about some mining issues that we haven’t yet mentioned. Let’s start with SHA-256 algorithm, as it will be also used for Tkeycoin mining. It stands for Secure Hashing Algorithm, developed by The US National Security Service. The main advantage of this algorithm is its ability to efficiently compress data and the zero probability of collisions. In simple words, SHA-256 is safe, quick and universal.

According to the US law, SHA-256 may be used by both individuals and commercial organizations. It is not surprising that SHA-256 was applied to cryptocurrencies - this algorithm allows to encrypt any amount of data, converting it into a compact line of cryptographic hash. It is very important for mining, as miners can encrypt all the transactions in one block, producing an output hash value of the fixed size. When miners manage to find the right hash, the block is considered solved and is added to the blockchain. This is exactly how cryptocurrencies are mined.

As the process is actually based on random guessing, miners with more computing power are the first to find the right hash. As we have already mentioned, SHA-256-based mining is possible with CPUs, GPUs and ASICs. And if the first 2 options (processors and video cards respectively) are familiar to everyone, the third one may be confusing both for beginners and experienced miners.

ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) is a type of hardware customized for a specific computer task. ASIC miners are suitable only for cryptocurrency mining. They use the circuits specifically created for efficient solving of hash puzzles. Even ASIC physical design meets the basic needs of mining - for example, they normally have very efficient cooling systems.

ASICs pay off pretty quickly, feature less energy consumption (compared with GPU analogs) and bigger hashrates. Also, as we have already said, they are provided with better cooling systems. Naturally, this type of mining hardware has its drawbacks, too. For instance, you can only use it for mining one or several cryptocurrencies, based on a certain algorithm. Besides, ASICs are fast to become obsolete. But, despite all this, they are normally a profitable investment.

To mine Tkeycoin you may use a wide variety of ASICs by Bitmain (Antminer S9, S11, T15), DragonMint T1, Ebang Communication, WhatsMiner M3 etc. It’s important to note that you will also be able to mine TKEY cryptocurrency with already ‘obsolete’ hardware, because in our case the network difficulty will be comparable with the early stages of Bitcoin existence. We will publish more details and numbers soon, after we have tested the network and made the preliminary calculations.

Anyway, you still have enough time for choosing your mining hardware, as ASIC and GPU mining will be unavailable during the first month of the network existence. Our team will need a certain amount of time for public network testing and tuning. Until this process is over, it will only be possible to mine Tkeycoin using PCs, laptops and smartphones.

As soon as we have completed all the necessary tests and stabilized the mining process, all the users will become able to mine the coins with ASICs, cloud-mining services, and GPU rigs - whatever option they prefer or can afford. For your convenience, we will also release a special mining profitability calculator that will help you choose the perfect hardware for your needs, resources and desired profit level. Until then you may use for this purpose any of the dozens calculators already available online.

About mining pools. As we mentioned earlier, we will start an official Tkeycoin mining pool that will let TKEY miners unite their computing powers. Besides, we plan to publish the source code, thus allowing thousands of enthusiasts worldwide to create their own pools for Tkeycoin mining.

In conclusion, there will be no limits for Tkeycoin mining. So far, we have received a lot of questions concerning this issue. No, there will not be any limits (like 3000 coins or whatever). Tkeycoin mining will be available for anyone, we mean it.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our social media pages and follow the news of the project. Soon, we will come up to you with some tech specs and more related details, including the size of reward for solving a block.
Check your news feed regularly not to miss anything!

See you soon!
Your Tkeycoin Team
submitted by tkeycoin to u/tkeycoin [link] [comments]

Is my computer good enough to be a profitable mining rig? (I'm new)

If it wasn't obvious already, I'm completely new to cryptocurrencies. I've only recently become interested in it and thought mining seems rather fun. However I'm not convinced in spending another few grand on a new computer just for mining when I already have a very high end workstation computer which I use to edit documentaries and short films.
These are my specs:
GPU: GeForce GTX 1080 in a 2 way SLI setup
CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-6800K CPU @ 3.60GHz
Memory: 32 GB RAM (31.91 GB RAM usable)
Storage: 1TB Samsung 960 M.2 SSD 3500MB/sR | 2100MB/sW, Samsung 850 EVO 2TB 2.5' SSD (540MB/sR | 520MB/sW), 6TB Toshiba 7200RPM HDD (200MB/s)
Motherboard: Asus Intel X99 Deluxe-II with PCI-e 3.0
Current resolution: 3840 x 2160, 60Hz on Displayport
Operating system: Microsoft Windows 10 Pro
Power supply: Corsair 1000W RMx Modular 80+ Gold Ultra Quiet
My internet speed averages 5/10Mbps and I use a very strong Ethernet cable for connection (I never use wireless) Oh and I also use liquid cooling for the CPU but not the graphics card. I've tried using calculators online but I couldn't come to any specific conclusions, someone please put me out of misery and give my rig some kind of rating. How good is my rig for mining the following: Ethereum, ADA, Waves, XMR, Electroneum? Those are the only ones besides Ripple (which I know you can't mine) which have interested me so far, I'm staying away from Bitcoin though. Also I apologize in advance if this whole post is a stupid question.
submitted by ProfChocolateCake to cryptomining [link] [comments]

Proof-of-key blockchain

Hello everyone. I've been thinking about a light alternative proof-of-(work/stake) algorithm for blockchains that doesn't imply hardware/electricy race. I'd like to request for your comments about it.
The reason why such exponential investment is made into this hardware/energy is because it is proportional to the chances of winning the proof-of-* race. The proposed algorithm to avoid such a race is to determine the winner before the race starts, with almost zero CPU power needed to discover its identity.
Let's consider that an arbitrary amount of coins have been pre-mined and sold to fund the development (e.g. 5%). In order to get a chance to be rewarded with newly mined coins and fees for discovering a new block, a node needs to have one or more reward-keypair(s). Such reward-keys can only be buyed/registered on the blockchain, its price must be set to at least the current number of coins rewarded for discovering a new block, let's say 50 coins for the first years, like for Bitcoin (1).
Buying/registering a new reward-key on the blockchain is like buying new rig hardware, the more you have on your node, the more you increase your chances to win the race (2). For every node to unanimously agree on the winner, they all need to work on the very same block of transactions, I explain later how I think this goal can be achieved. Then, a simple checksum hash needs to be computed by every nodes on the new block, it is made of the previous head block's nonce appended by the ordered sum of outgoing transactions' addresses (3), it must have the same length in bits as the pubic-reward-keys (e.g. 256 bits), the public-reward-key that is the closest to this hash is the winner (nearest neighbor matching like with LSH). The node that happens to be the winner (who owns the corresponding private-reward-key) has to claim the block by signing the totality of its data (block's head index on the chain, ordered transactions in full, plus its reward transaction) and broadcast its claim for other nodes to validate and add it to their blockchain's head (4). If the block is not claimed, it can be for multiple reasons, blockchain fork (nodes not working on the very same block of transactions because of accidental or malicious cacophony), network latency, or simply the wining node being down. But I think these cases can be dealt with securely, as explained below.
In order to be sure that every node of the network is working on the very same block of transactions at the very same time, some rigorous synchronization has to be set up, with carrot and stick for the participating nodes. First thing is to prevent transactions from being constantly broadcast, otherwise because of propagation delay the data of the new block would always be in an inconsistent state among the different nodes. As the delay for having data propagated to 99% of a P2P network (Bitcoin) appears to be about 40 seconds (4), I propose an arbitrary "pulse window" of 20 seconds for nodes to initiate the broadcast of their transactions (they need to synchronize at startup via NTP), followed by 40 seconds of retention of new transactions (meanwhile new transactions are being queued in each node, waiting for the next pulse), for letting the time of all the transactions to reach the totality of the network. So, there is one broadcast pulse every minute (20+40), as well as one new block. If any node do not play the game (wrongdoing, miss-configuration, bad QoS, etc.) that triggers cacophony, the network will have to identify and ban them (5) at the next pulse. On the other hand, nodes that provide good synchronization, QoS, etc. will be rewarded by receiving a part of the fees of the transactions that they have initially broadcast. To do so, transactions and their entry node need to identify each other reciprocally. Each transaction identifies the entry node chosen for broadcast, as well as the node signs the transaction (or preferably a whole transactions' batch in a single network packet). Node identification is done via one of its reward-key(s).
If some transactions are sent too late, not reaching the totality (99.9%) of the network (likely to be initially broadcast around the 55th second, just before the end of the 20+40 seconds pulse (4), instead of the dedicated initial 20 seconds pulse window, because of intentional cacophony malice, or miss-configuration, bad QoS being more unlikely for such a long lag), then the blockchain's working head will be forked into multiple heads. Therefore, the probability of finding the next block will be divided by the number of different forked heads (proportionally to the respective number of nodes working on each forked head). Let's take an arbitrary case scenario where the blockchain gets forked into 3 equally distributed heads, each representing 33.3% of the nodes, the respective chances to find each of these 3 different forked blocks is divided by 3 (for each forked head block there is a 66.6% chance that the winning reward-key is working on another block, therefore won't claim it). Thus, after 2 or 3 iteration pulses (or even only one), the entirety of the network will find the block discovery/validation rate dramatically drop, which will trigger nodes to enter "cacophony mode", stopping to emit transactions, and broadcast the blocks they are working on after the cacophony was detected (and maybe one or two blocks before that as an uncertainty margin), as well as the signature of the block's hash by the node (6). After few seconds/minutes, all the nodes will have gathered a reference copy of all different versions of blocks being worked on, along with the number of times they have been signed (a.k.a in which proportions a specific version of a block were spread amongst the network). All nodes now have an accurate snapshot of the total topology and consistency the network, few blocks backward from the blockchain's head, before the fork happened. Then nodes can independently compare blocks, whitelisting every nodes that had their transactions registered on every blocks (meaning they were broadcast on time), baning those that are on some blocks but not other popular ones (7), therefore the network self-heals by purging bad nodes, and resume mining by rolling back to the last block that was mined before the cacophony started.
In the case of a node suspecting cacophony because being in the fringe of the network or out-of-sync (thus not receiving transactions on proper time), other nodes won't be in "cacophony mode", so the node will find itself lonely by not receiving any/enough different block versions (along with their signed hashes), therefore it will know that there is no cacophony, but bad QoS or configuration, this will need to be fixed by resync NTP, re-configure, change peers, sys-admin intervention, etc. They'll have to catch up quickly not to miss the race/reward.
In the case of a block not being claimed because of the winner node being down, the network would enter in "cacophony mode" as well, but figure out that it is consistent, therefore simply blacklisting the winning public-reward-key of the unclaimed block, until it gets unlocked by a dedicated "unlock message", signed with its corresponding private-reward-key when the node gets back online.
There might be plenty of smallebigger flaws that I did not think about, I'd like to request for your help in identifying and hopefully fixing them. I've been thinking that rich wrongdoers could escape the carrot and stick policy constraint by buying reward-keys with the only goal to prevent the network from taking off, provoking endless cacophony. I think this can be fixed by adjusting the price of the reward-keys over time (1), or even using a non-mandatory collaborative blacklist system for the early stage of network growth, until the price of reward-keys becomes dissuasive for a performing real prejudicial sabotage, even for rich wrongdoers. Also, because there is no CPU constraint for calculating blocks, it would be easy for anyone to forge a longer chain, however I'm not sure that the longer chain policy is the best here, and such forged chains could be easily detected because of a too much redundant winners' identity (not representative of the global reward-key pool), and not to mention that it cannot be broadcast as nodes do not get new blocks from the network but calculate them internally.
What do you think?
Thanks,
Camille.
(1) Price for buying/registering a new reward-key cannot be lower to the number of coins rewarded for finding a block to prevent their number to be exponential, but it could/should be higher to prevent rich wrongdoers to buy many and use them to disturb the network, it could also maintain the size of the network to a consistent state. Here we take the example of 50 coins per reward-key, which means one every minute, one every few hours sounds more reasonable and manageable, but this is outside of the scope of this post.
(2) A special transaction has to be done for purchasing a reward-key, unlike when simply spending coins with outgoing/incoming wallet address, here you send your self-generated public-reward-key (needless to say while keeping the private key private) along with your 50 coins, in return the network makes the 50 coins available again to miners as a reward for the next block discovery, and register your public-reward-key on the blockchain. The reverse operation to destroy the reward-key for getting the 50 coins reimbursed should be possible, as well a replacing a reward-key by a new one if suspected by the owner of being corrupted/stolen. The 50 coins given when finding a new block (or being reimbursed) are made available again from a previous purchase(s), or newly created if this coin reserve is empty. The available monetary mass may inflate or shrink depending of the market demand for reward-keys (mining) or liquidity, this policy can be discussed and algorithmically adjusted/limited in the specs (e.g. coins made available again after buying rewards-keys cannot represent more than 10% of the minted coins).
(3) We use outgoing transaction's addresses because they cannot be forged on-the-fly to alter the resulting hash. If we use the full transaction for calculating the "winning hash", nodes could try to forge and inject one transaction at the last second, playing with decimals to get the closest result to one of their public-reward-key, which would incite again for a hardware/electricity race.
(4) http://www.tik.ee.ethz.ch/file/49318d3f56c1d525aabf7fda78b23fc0/P2P2013_041.pdf
(5) Quarantine duration should be incremental for each ban, e.g.: 3h, 12h, 72h, 2 weeks, 4 months, one year, etc.
(6) Any node signing more than one different block for the same head number will be banned (5) and its data ignored.
(7) In "cacophony mode" marginal blocks that are not widespread and lacking transactions number should be ignored, they are more likely to be on the fringe of the network, not having received some transactions on time because of QoS-like issues.
submitted by mammique to crypto [link] [comments]

Moved post: Mining ETC, electrical, considering to downscale mining?

This is a long post...I had to move this post from mining to miningrig. So hopefully this post is in the correct forum: MiningRig.
Ok so I think I may be freaking out a bit. Maybe for nothing? Well my 6 card mining rig is drawing 660watts per Hive OS from the cards and from the total rig, probably 750-760 watts. I'm only mining ETC. I also have a kill a watt meter and measured it form the wall. The outlet below it has another power surge protector with my xbox one x, 27 inch asus rog strix monitor, and two rokit 5 speakers sitting nearby my mining rig. I measured the watts with all of the xbox stuff on and it draws roughly 125-130 watts. Is this ok? I’m mining in my living room that also has the 65" 4K TV with a xbox one S and Apple TV connected to it. Not sure how much power is drawing from this set up but I assume not as much as the mining rig.
I guess I’m also worried because I’m getting AC installed brand new in my home in the next couple of weeks. One downstairs is 36,000 BTUs and upstairs is 12,000 BTUs. With this, I hope I’m not overloading the electrical system.
I’m thinking maybe I shouldn’t have gotten into mining and just used that money to buy more bitcoin. FML.
I’m wondering if I should sell 2 of my 1070s and just keep two 1070s and two 1080 Ti’s that I have running right now. Or just keep them all and use the two 1070s and build my family a gaming computer with SLI. lol. I’m not hurting for the money, but thinking if maybe cool to build them a gaming computer.
Or better yet, I’ll give them to my brother in law and my father in law to upgrade their gaming computer! THEN that would be priceless because that would put me on their favorite list. lol
Ultimately I've been thinking for a couple days now...Its been real miners! Gonna just keep my two 1080 Ti’s and sell off my 4 1070s. Too paranoid about straining the eletrical supply on the house and risking a fire or damage on a 15A circuit. I’m selling two 1070s and giving the other two to my father in law and brother in law as a Christmas gift lol. The two 1080’s, I’ll keep it on my mining rig running with the ethenlargementpill to contribute to the space, while safely mining without straining my home’s electrical system especially since I’m having a large split duct AC unit installed in the next few weeks. With the rest of the potential gain in coins, I’ll just continue to buy from Abra and collect that ETC and BTC!
I know I know, I spent money on this rig, thus I am going to keep the other components along with the two 1080 Ti’s to still take part in mining, but at a lower scale. The two 1080 Ti’s with the eth pill will be running at 160 watts each, add on 90-100 watts for the rig components, that’ll come out to rougly 420 watts total coming from one circuit. Along with my xbox one x set up (135 watts), other xbox one X connected to the Samsung 65" TV (245 watts?), bose cinemate 15 (300 watts per mfcr specs), 8 LED light bulbs (13 watts each) in the living room. Plus a few fans in the same living room. With the upcoming split duct AC unit, it’ll probably be an overload in this one area. But then again I’ll leave the AC unit issue to the installers. We got this house built brand new in 2005 and we never had AC installed until now because its gotten so hot/humid here in Hawaii. However, when I looked at my circuit breaker panel, looks like the AC unit will have its own dedicated circuit with a 30 amp circuit (per the panel door with the sticker showing which circuit switch goes to what) and this wil be installed by my HVAC company and their electrician so maybe I could ask him about leaving my mining rig with current cards in running 24/7 and using my AC unit with our 25 photovoltaic panels being installed on the roof since the mining rig will be on its separate circuit of 15 amps per the circuit breaker panel.
Otherwise I’ll continue to mine with the 4 1070 cards, throw one of the 1080 Tis into my gaming PC to do a SLI set up, and throw the third 1080 Ti into another gaming computer later down the road.
I could hire an electrician to inspect and upgrade to the power system. Then I thought about it and it maybe best to just give the 1070s away to family as a awesome Christmas gift and just continue to buy coins.
Dam guys, this mining adventure has been fun but short lived for me because of the extraneous variables that came up after the fact. I was stupid to not look further into the eletrical situation. But then again, I learned my lesson and learned how to mine and how to build rig. I believe I should be safe by running the two 1080 Tis alone…that’ll be 320 watts plus the rig parts (100watts) = 420 watts, which is well under the recommended limit of continuous electrical power use through my living room circuit even with the other mentioned electrical stuff in that living room.

UPDATE!
Wait!! Before I give away or sell anything, just want to see if what I did is right. It seems my rig is connected to my backyard/Lanai switch on the circuit panel. My max AMP per my circuit breaker panel for the house is 125 amps and this rig is using is now using 760 watts (current max power draw limit set on HIVE OS to 660 watts for all 6 cards) including the +100 watts estimated for rig parts. When I was testing out the circuit panel to see which switch belongs to which, it seems my entertainment center with the large TV and xbox and Bose home theater is connected on a different switch.
Thus, everything in front of my living room turns off when I turn off one switch and the other switch turns off the back of the living room and outside lanai lights (which has flood lights we barely use).
Next to my rig in the back living room is my xbox one x set up with monitor and speakers drawing 135 watts. Along with my google wifi router (9 watt power consumption), netgear CM500 cable modem (18 watts based on 1.5amp x 12volts), three 13 watt light bulbs (39 watts), Bionaire tower fan (40 watts), Vornado large fan (68 watts).
Majority of the time I don’t have the xbox system on continuously, only on some nights when playing online with BF1. I don’t have all 3 light bulbs on continuously, mostly the one floor lamp with one bulb on at night. But if I did have everything on, I would be drawing about 74% of that 1440 watt limit.
Also, I’m thinking about just leaving the mining rig on during the day while I’m at work for about 8-10 hours and when I come home, turn it off so that I can freely use my xbox system and other things connected around this area of the house without worrying about the mining rig along with the other stuff here drawing too much power on the circuit. Thus, the rig would be working for 8-10 hours a day and also when I leave the house for trips and such, I’ll leave the mining rig on while away since someone will always be home but not be in my man space. Since this is a hobby, I’m thinking of just doing this and turning it off at night so I don’t have to deal with worry about the overload electricity use and the awful heat thats created right behind me.
Despite this strategy, today I decided to turn it off while I'm at work for 8 hrs just in case something happens and then when I come home, I'll turn the miner back on to mine for 12 hours overnight then turn it off in the morning again. I wanted some input from you guys before I go back to leaving my miner on 24/7 again which I never ran into any problems with when I had 5 cards (four 1070 and one 1080 Ti), but now that I added one more 1080 Ti to max out the 6 card capacity on my mining rig, I got really worried about the electrical use. I toned down the power draw watts to 90 watts per 1070 card and 150 per 1080Ti card. I do notice that the 1080Ti works optimally with 160 watts with the ethenlargement pill.
submitted by Captmedu74 to MiningRig [link] [comments]

My Bitcoin Mining Project and MRIP

EDIT: Everyone, I totally f'd up on GPU's that I would have by end of June. I just wrote a quick VBS script that shows I'll only have 22 (15+7) by end of June. Not too shabby, but definitely not 48. Just wanted to post an update. Feel free to use the script!
So I've posted here a few times in the past. Now I'll detail what I'm doing a little further and try to help others.
Right now I'm working with 5x 7950's, 3x 7850's, a 6750, and 3x GTX 580's (my gaming rig). My hash rate is about 4,500 MH/s. I started this project using the DRIP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dividend_reinvestment_plan) principles in mind. I call this MRIP (Mining Reinvestment Plan). The plan is to reinvest all bitcoins mined into more mining hardware. Today I just purchased two more 7950's that are due to arrive tomorrow. Note that these two cards were purchased with bitcoins that were mined. This should bring my hash rate up to about 5660 MH/s, which will let me purchase another card next monday. The plan is every time I have enough to buy another card, I withdraw the bitcoins and convert it into cash. At this rate I'm hoping to have about 48 additional 7950 cards by the end of June or about 33,000 MH/s (33GH/s).
To those I haven't gotten back with about hardware that I'm ordering, I do apologize. I'm using ported 7950's. I STRESS ported cards (ported on top, other on bottom) because they throw the heat out of the chassis. When clustering 12 cases together (4x12=48 cards) it's not ideal to "just leave the side off and hope it's cool it enough". These cases will be slammed up against each other. Going to back to hardware, I still haven't decided on a locked feature set - meaning I don't know what I'm going to buy (mobo, ram, cpu, psu, etc). Ideally I want to keep the core system down to about $70/PCI-e slot, but I have to factor in space (hashing density too).
I say this because hardware pricing is always changing, but I want to lock the specs down eventually because it'll be easy to administer. Having 12 like systems will be easier to deploy than 12 totally different systems (all I have to do is image them). Being a net/sys admin I'll probably administer them with a PXE boot image (which I plan on making that publicly available along with the system specs). Anyways I apologize about that.
I run an IT consulting company on the side and thus I have A CRAP LOAD of old machines with a working PCI-e slot (or two or three). I'll be using these up and then will start building out a system.
Going back to mining, I'm not sure what ASIC's have in store for us. The difficulty could rise so much that by end of June I only have 4 more GPUs instead of 48. My hope is that the difficulty will not go up that high as ASIC's are still very hard to come by and really don't make a good investment case right now (or then). Looking at the difficulty graphs, TH/s seem to be leveling off in the near future - but only time will tell! Let me know if this helps! FYI I have put $0 into this so far, as I've been using old hand-me-down GPU's...
Edit: You all are more than welcome to check out my mining stats!
UltraSPARC_1 = 4x 7950's UltraSPARC_2 = 1x 7950 UltraSPARC_3 = 6750 UltraSPARC_4/5/7 = 7850 UltraSPARC_6 = 3x GTX 580 UltraSPARC_8 = 2x 7950
EDIT 2: A lot of you have mentioned why not buy an ASIC or aren't you afraid the difficulty will skyrocket?! I just don't see that happening soon, and this post makes my case quite nicely. They're even assuming that Butterfly Labs will start shipping in quantity lol
Edit 3: UltraSPARC_8 is online! Two more 7950's, woohoo! I'll post some pictures soon.
Pictures! YAY! For reference please see HERE
My personal accomplishments as of late - Exchange 2010 /w AD deployed recently!
Updates on cards - Because today we saw another pop - I'm planning on buy two (not one) cards by next tuesday. I have about 5 more deprecated systems to use up - thus saving me money - before I plan on locking in a system. Keep ya posted! Thanks for stopping by!
Please note UltraSPARC_6 will be going off line once I get four more cards... This is my gaming rig, and seeing that nVidia "ain't shit" with mining, there's no point in burning up $500 cards...
Edit 4: Just got another 7950 in! Bringing my total hash rate up to a 7,800 MH/s peak! It should settle down though to the high 6,000 range...
Ok, now my mining pool is messing with me. How is this even real?! I mean I'll take the PPS, not complaining or anything!
submitted by UltraSPARC to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

So I'm building a new PC after about 7 years of playing on the same prebuilt.

But, before I commit to parts and everything, I was looking at a catalog I got in the mail today and saw this. Now I know this is probably the wrong community to ask about prebuilts, but I just wanna know with the savings if thats a good deal. A deal worth getting that over building my own. My budget is anywhere from $1000-1400. I was looking over the specs with my semi-limited knowledge, and it looked like a good deal.
Should I just not bother with a prebuilt again? Also one more random question, my friend online was telling me it's not a good time to build PCs because of parts being bought up for mining bitcoin? Is that trend kind of over or should I wait to splurge on a brand new rig?
submitted by master3183 to buildapc [link] [comments]

2GB GPU – parity and ethminer – June 2017 – GPU can't allocate the DAG in a single chunk. Bailing. - how big is a DAG?

Hello, I hope somebody knows what to do. I'm completely new to cryptocurrency mining, started today in the morning. I read some articles and saw online vids about ethereum wich totally caught my interest. As for now, I'm trying to get the ethminer to work but with no success. At first I started to download the Ethereum blockchain via geth, but while loading in the background I read more articles/forum posts, that it will take quite some time, even days in fact. Also I'm not sure about the size of the blockchain, but I also read that it's almost 60GB big in size and increasing steadily. That's why I deleted some games from my 120GB SSD, now I've around 50GB free space. So I loocked for alternatives and found parity, wich syncs WAY faster with the blockchain and you don't have to download it entireley.
After some toying around with it, I think I actually got it set up right, it seems synced with the most recent blocks (#3934469) and I also got an address wich I can see in the parity browser interface. Also, I got ethminer (0.9.41-genoil-1.1.6-pre) running, but only to a certain point. Here is it how I do it atm:
I open 2 command prompts, one for parity, one for ethminer. For parity I simply drag and drop the folder containing the .exe, actually erase „.exe“ and replace it then with „--author 0034468D471D2F1dD63aFDFbE12fbaC7e594a090 --chain homestead“ and press enter. It then works I guess, but I don't know for certain if the blockchain reward would go to my address. For ethminer I also drag and drop it into the command prompt, erase .exe and type „ -G“ and hit enter. It works at first, but I read the line „Allocating/mapping DAG buffer failed with: clCreateBuffer(-61). GPU can't allocate the DAG in a single chunk. Bailing“ followed by some lines saying „hh:mm:ss | main Mining on PoWash #0dee0fe5 : 0.00MH/s [A0+0:R0+0:F0]“ and ends with „Got work package: #bf3fe4af“ but it doesn't continue from there, while the parity command prompt just keeps running.
I can't get any further than this for now. Most posts I can find regarding this issue are from 2016. I can't find a simple answer on how big the DAG is of TODAY, is it over 2GB? Can you even mine ether with a 2GB GPU? Are there actually better mining softwares than ethminer? I installed the newest driver version for my GPU and entered some stx gpu commands wich should set the usage to 100% or something wich I found in some articles regarding this issue.
My specs, AMD A8-6600K CPU overclocked to 4,4MhZ, Radeon R7 200 GPU with 2GB memory size, 120GB SSD, windows 8.1. Also I've the onboard graphics turned off in the BIOS.
I've also created an account on Kraken, where I planned to trade ether for euro. Are there currently other major cryptocoins I could mine with this rig? For now I'm too tired and probably will continue researching a bit more tomorrow, but I think mining Bitcoin for example wouldn't work for me with this rig aswell.
On a sidenote, my android mobile wich I use for USB tethering so I've internet access on my PC is restarting by itself since I'm trying this all out, I swear I never experienced this problem before and I had intense gaming sessions with multiple hours before without it shutting down.
Thank you
submitted by changeusdtoreal to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Proof-of-key blockchain

Hi, this is a repost from /crypto where it was out of topic (https://www.reddit.com/crypto/comments/6vdfoc/proofofkey_blockchain/).
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Hello everyone. I've been thinking about a light alternative proof-of-(work/stake) algorithm for blockchains that doesn't imply hardware/electricy race. I'd like to request for your comments about it.
The reason why such exponential investment is made into this hardware/energy is because it is proportional to the chances of winning the proof-of-* race. The proposed algorithm to avoid such a race is to determine the winner before the race starts, with almost zero CPU power needed to discover its identity.
Let's consider that an arbitrary amount of coins have been pre-mined and sold to fund the development (e.g. 5%). In order to get a chance to be rewarded with newly mined coins and fees for discovering a new block, a node needs to have one or more reward-keypair(s). Such reward-keys can only be buyed/registered on the blockchain, its price must be set to at least the current number of coins rewarded for discovering a new block, let's say 50 coins for the first years, like for Bitcoin (1).
Buying/registering a new reward-key on the blockchain is like buying new rig hardware, the more you have on your node, the more you increase your chances to win the race (2). For every node to unanimously agree on the winner, they all need to work on the very same block of transactions, I explain later how I think this goal can be achieved. Then, a simple checksum hash needs to be computed by every nodes on the new block, it is made of the previous head block's nonce appended by the ordered sum of outgoing transactions' addresses (3), it must have the same length in bits as the pubic-reward-keys (e.g. 256 bits), the public-reward-key that is the closest to this hash is the winner (nearest neighbor matching like with LSH). The node that happens to be the winner (who owns the corresponding private-reward-key) has to claim the block by signing the totality of its data (block's head index on the chain, ordered transactions in full, plus its reward transaction) and broadcast its claim for other nodes to validate and add it to their blockchain's head (4). If the block is not claimed, it can be for multiple reasons, blockchain fork (nodes not working on the very same block of transactions because of accidental or malicious cacophony), network latency, or simply the wining node being down. But I think these cases can be dealt with securely, as explained below.
In order to be sure that every node of the network is working on the very same block of transactions at the very same time, some rigorous synchronization has to be set up, with carrot and stick for the participating nodes. First thing is to prevent transactions from being constantly broadcast, otherwise because of propagation delay the data of the new block would always be in an inconsistent state among the different nodes. As the delay for having data propagated to 99% of a P2P network (Bitcoin) appears to be about 40 seconds (4), I propose an arbitrary "pulse window" of 20 seconds for nodes to initiate the broadcast of their transactions (they need to synchronize at startup via NTP), followed by 40 seconds of retention of new transactions (meanwhile new transactions are being queued in each node, waiting for the next pulse), for letting the time of all the transactions to reach the totality of the network. So, there is one broadcast pulse every minute (20+40), as well as one new block. If any node do not play the game (wrongdoing, miss-configuration, bad QoS, etc.) that triggers cacophony, the network will have to identify and ban them (5) at the next pulse. On the other hand, nodes that provide good synchronization, QoS, etc. will be rewarded by receiving a part of the fees of the transactions that they have initially broadcast. To do so, transactions and their entry node need to identify each other reciprocally. Each transaction identifies the entry node chosen for broadcast, as well as the node signs the transaction (or preferably a whole transactions' batch in a single network packet). Node identification is done via one of its reward-key(s).
If some transactions are sent too late, not reaching the totality (99.9%) of the network (likely to be initially broadcast around the 55th second, just before the end of the 20+40 seconds pulse (4), instead of the dedicated initial 20 seconds pulse window, because of intentional cacophony malice, or miss-configuration, bad QoS being more unlikely for such a long lag), then the blockchain's working head will be forked into multiple heads. Therefore, the probability of finding the next block will be divided by the number of different forked heads (proportionally to the respective number of nodes working on each forked head). Let's take an arbitrary case scenario where the blockchain gets forked into 3 equally distributed heads, each representing 33.3% of the nodes, the respective chances to find each of these 3 different forked blocks is divided by 3 (for each forked head block there is a 66.6% chance that the winning reward-key is working on another block, therefore won't claim it). Thus, after 2 or 3 iteration pulses (or even only one), the entirety of the network will find the block discovery/validation rate dramatically drop, which will trigger nodes to enter "cacophony mode", stopping to emit transactions, and broadcast the blocks they are working on after the cacophony was detected (and maybe one or two blocks before that as an uncertainty margin), as well as the signature of the block's hash by the node (6). After few seconds/minutes, all the nodes will have gathered a reference copy of all different versions of blocks being worked on, along with the number of times they have been signed (a.k.a in which proportions a specific version of a block were spread amongst the network). All nodes now have an accurate snapshot of the total topology and consistency the network, few blocks backward from the blockchain's head, before the fork happened. Then nodes can independently compare blocks, whitelisting every nodes that had their transactions registered on every blocks (meaning they were broadcast on time), baning those that are on some blocks but not other popular ones (7), therefore the network self-heals by purging bad nodes, and resume mining by rolling back to the last block that was mined before the cacophony started.
In the case of a node suspecting cacophony because being in the fringe of the network or out-of-sync (thus not receiving transactions on proper time), other nodes won't be in "cacophony mode", so the node will find itself lonely by not receiving any/enough different block versions (along with their signed hashes), therefore it will know that there is no cacophony, but bad QoS or configuration, this will need to be fixed by resync NTP, re-configure, change peers, sys-admin intervention, etc. They'll have to catch up quickly not to miss the race/reward.
In the case of a block not being claimed because of the winner node being down, the network would enter in "cacophony mode" as well, but figure out that it is consistent, therefore simply blacklisting the winning public-reward-key of the unclaimed block, until it gets unlocked by a dedicated "unlock message", signed with its corresponding private-reward-key when the node gets back online.
There might be plenty of smallebigger flaws that I did not think about, I'd like to request for your help in identifying and hopefully fixing them. I've been thinking that rich wrongdoers could escape the carrot and stick policy constraint by buying reward-keys with the only goal to prevent the network from taking off, provoking endless cacophony. I think this can be fixed by adjusting the price of the reward-keys over time (1), or even using a non-mandatory collaborative blacklist system for the early stage of network growth, until the price of reward-keys becomes dissuasive for a performing real prejudicial sabotage, even for rich wrongdoers. Also, because there is no CPU constraint for calculating blocks, it would be easy for anyone to forge a longer chain, however I'm not sure that the longer chain policy is the best here, and such forged chains could be easily detected because of a too much redundant winners' identity (not representative of the global reward-key pool), and not to mention that it cannot be broadcast as nodes do not get new blocks from the network but calculate them internally.
What do you think?
Thanks,
Camille.
(1) Price for buying/registering a new reward-key cannot be lower to the number of coins rewarded for finding a block to prevent their number to be exponential, but it could/should be higher to prevent rich wrongdoers to buy many and use them to disturb the network, it could also maintain the size of the network to a consistent state. Here we take the example of 50 coins per reward-key, which means one every minute, one every few hours sounds more reasonable and manageable, but this is outside of the scope of this post.
(2) A special transaction has to be done for purchasing a reward-key, unlike when simply spending coins with outgoing/incoming wallet address, here you send your self-generated public-reward-key (needless to say while keeping the private key private) along with your 50 coins, in return the network makes the 50 coins available again to miners as a reward for the next block discovery, and register your public-reward-key on the blockchain. The reverse operation to destroy the reward-key for getting the 50 coins reimbursed should be possible, as well a replacing a reward-key by a new one if suspected by the owner of being corrupted/stolen. The 50 coins given when finding a new block (or being reimbursed) are made available again from a previous purchase(s), or newly created if this coin reserve is empty. The available monetary mass may inflate or shrink depending of the market demand for reward-keys (mining) or liquidity, this policy can be discussed and algorithmically adjusted/limited in the specs (e.g. coins made available again after buying rewards-keys cannot represent more than 10% of the minted coins).
(3) We use outgoing transaction's addresses because they cannot be forged on-the-fly to alter the resulting hash. If we use the full transaction for calculating the "winning hash", nodes could try to forge and inject one transaction at the last second, playing with decimals to get the closest result to one of their public-reward-key, which would incite again for a hardware/electricity race.
(4) http://www.tik.ee.ethz.ch/file/49318d3f56c1d525aabf7fda78b23fc0/P2P2013_041.pdf
(5) Quarantine duration should be incremental for each ban, e.g.: 3h, 12h, 72h, 2 weeks, 4 months, one year, etc.
(6) Any node signing more than one different block for the same head number will be banned (5) and its data ignored.
(7) In "cacophony mode" marginal blocks that are not widespread and lacking transactions number should be ignored, they are more likely to be on the fringe of the network, not having received some transactions on time because of QoS-like issues.
submitted by mammique to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Questions, questions, questions....

Hey guys, so I wanted to get into the whole bitcoin thing, and after a little research I came to the conclusion that cpu/gpu mining bitcoins is no longer profitable. Old news to you guys. Looked around some more and people were saying that Litecoin is the way to go for gpu mining.
Ive looked up a few tutorials on how to get started, but I can't seem to find any information on if I would even profit with the current computer I have. I dont wanna go through all this work setting up, just to have a program run on my computer that does nothing overall. Most things I see are about people building mining specific rigs, upgrading or whatever, but upgrading isn't an option for me currently (broke university student).
Could anyone give me some insight on if I should bother with my current specs? I have an intel I7 - 3770 for my processor and an AMD Radeon HD 8570 graphics card.
Another question I have is once I get litecoins, how and when should I trade them for bitcoins? if at all? and finally, lets say I want to cash out, is there any way to get straight up cash? or do I have to make online purchases where these coins are accepted?
EDIT: formatting.
submitted by ImOnTheWeed to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

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