9 Best Bitcoin Miner Software (Oct 2020)

Prepping for rtx 3080 and Zen 3. Need help with prepping, water cooling, and

Hello there! I've been building PC's for quite some time but always did it on my own and seldom lurk reddit etc. Therefore I apologize for having no idea if there are specific terms for the following.
I've decided to upgrade my i7 4790 and my gtx970. My current plan is to buy the x570 Asus strix motherboard, rtx 3080, zen3 CPU, and the Samsung 970x evo. However Nvidia only recently teased their GPU and I have no idea when the CPU is going to be released. My main concern is that what if it turns out that the Mobo, the GPU, or even the SSD is DOA, I wouldn't have a clue until I boot it up. Zen3 is scheduled to come out in 2020 but no news on whether it's at Q3 or Q4.
I apologize if these questions seem rather ridiculous to you all. Again, I have been building PC's for a long time, but I have never waited on components to be released like this.
My questions would be
1) Should I buy a super cheap am4 CPU so that I can test out my gear? If so, what is the cheapest am4 CPU?
2) How long does it usually take for water blocks to come out following the release of a GPU?
3) How does preordering of GPUs work? Do random websites just have it available for preorder starting month x day x hour x? Is there usually enough stock for a few days or does a large number of consumers/ scalpers buy out the Founders edition of GPU? I understand that between the 970 and 3080 GPUs became high demand due to Bitcoin mining so I'm wondering just how in demand the next big GPU is usually.
Thank you so very much for your time!
submitted by Mar2ne to buildapc [link] [comments]

Trying to decide weather or not to get a Z11, S19 or S9. Opinions wanted.

Edit I ment type Z11 S17 or A9 (freaking autocorrect)
I'm looking to buy a profitable ASIC with a $2000 budget. And I'm looking for you reddits knowledge and experience to make sure I'm going down the right path.
So far I'm leaning on purchasing a Antminer Z11. The price is reasonable and the profitability looks good.
Another choice is the infosillicon A9. They are probably the cheapest miner that turns a profit, and the low wattage consumption is attractive so I don't have to upscale my electrical right away. If I chose the A9 I would buy 2 or more.
Third choice is the s17. It's more expensive and less profitable but it mines bitcoin. And I wonder if there's any unforeseen advantage of mining bitcoin should it moon shot.
GPU's I have a GPU rig running right now, and I plan on adding to it, but really want to dive deeper into ASIC mining right now.
Thoughts?
submitted by ThatCoupleYou to cryptomining [link] [comments]

[USA-OH] [H] Desktop - i9 7920X, GTX 1080Ti, 64GB DDR4, 1TB SSD [W] Local Cash

Hi people, I have a computer that I built a few years back and would like to get rid of. This computer has never been used to play any games, mine bitcoin, etc. My brother used it as an office PC.
Okay so here is the full part list, along with what I could find each part for at the cheapest...
CPU: i9-7920X Skylake 2.9GHz 12-core - $600
GPU: GTX 1080TI (ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-011G-GAMING) - $600
Motherboard: ASUS TUF X299 Mark 1 - $350
Memory: Vengeance LPX 4x16GB 2666MHz DDR4 RAM - $220
Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 1TB M.2 - $200
AIO: Thermaltake FLOE RIING - $160
WiFi: Asus PCE-AC558T - $35
Case: CORSAIR CRYSTAL 570X RGB ATX CASE - $150
PSU: EVGA 850 G3 - $140
OS: W10 Pro
I'm asking for the combination of all these prices, and sell the whole computer as one (I don't want to part out right now). So $2455 for the rig. I'm not going to add in the cost of windows. If my prices are nuts please let me know.
Your sweet proof
I don't have a CPU-Z because I didn't know that was a requirement before I reset windows. I hope the UEFI picture makes up for it.
submitted by Tanilazation to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

Post Bitcoin, my country is a heaven for Haswell-based PC gaming

Just want to share this "phenomenon" I've noticed for quite sometime. When my brother's mainboard failed, we thought of selling whatever that's left and upgrade to Ryzen. But it would never hurt to do another check, so I went on my wife's favourite online shopping platform to search for one. And voila, I found a B85 mainboard for ~$40.
Their recommendation engine quickly kicked in. To my surprise, "8GB DDR3" is one of the most popular search keywords. This means a lot of people were looking for them, so Haswell builds must be popular. I know mine is still running well.
So I decided to calculate the cost for a whole Haswell-based build, and this is what it cost to have an extremely decent gaming machine:
Total, minus HDD/SDD, monitor or mouse/kb: $275
There are, of course, a lot of risks:

And yes this build ins't going to win any speed contest, and the RX580 most likely gets bottlenecked by the CPU... But the beauty of this is, for $275, people can get a PC that can play pretty much ALL the AAA titles decently without breaking the bank. On my PC with similar configuration, I often get ~70-80fps out of TD1 and BF1. Even at Ultra in BF1, in smaller maps, I can still get ~60fps.
This is something I don't think has ever happened. I don't recall being able to play AAA games on a $275 build. Thank you, Bitcoin crash.
Edit: I just checked again and the price of the GPU went up, the cheapest RX 580 8GB now goes for ~$75. However $50 can still net you a RX 570 4GB, in this build the difference isn’t quite noticeable
submitted by EgoDivinus to buildapc [link] [comments]

Mining profitability gaining momentum

Mining profitability gaining momentum
We are back!
For the last 2 years there was not much to shill in mining mining was on the life support. And the profits constantly got decreasing. Start of 2020 Bitcoin and Altcoins are showing great performance in price action. This price action has also increased mining profits in some coins for more then 100% since december 2019. It might be to early to say that “we are back” , as crypto can be so unpredictable. But there is a lot of signs that we have now oversold a lot and value of crypto market is increasing steadily. We might see this pattern continue for good bit of times as BTC halving is coming up in 3 month. Let’s get in straight in. I will choose 3 hardware devices which in my opinion would be the best choice and we will see how profitable they are.
If you are new to mining and you want to know which devices to choose, choose from top market cap coins latest equipment. This will be your safest bet, as the mining profits are much more stable on bigger cap coins then on smaller cap coins. If you are small miner and don’t have large electric bills, you can choose smaller cap coins. They might go up in price lot faster then bigger cap coins in bull market, but be aware they they might dump lot faster. It is high risk high reward type of mining.
If you are really serious about mining, you need to look at cheapest power source possible which would be in 0.05c a kw/h range. It is not 2017 and mining from home wont be profitable at 0.30c a kw/h. Industrial power is possible to achieve 0.05 in many places in the world. If it is not possible in your country , look for the country where it is possible. So all profit calculations done for 0.05c a kw/h
Top mining profitability websites :
  • https://www.asicminervalue.com/ It is great website to see newest ASIC miners and their profitability. Usually the new upcoming mining machines gets listed here. So come and checkout this page every few days/weeks this page if you are serious about mining.

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  • https://whattomine.com/ Is the best known for GPU/CPU mining profitability. You can choose what ever hardware to use and it will give you the best and most profitable coins to mine. It is very simple to use it. It does have Also asic miner profitability check, but for asics i do prefer asicminervalue,com

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The top and 3 most profitable Crypto currencies to mine in February 2020 , for some people miner pick could be different. The prices changes if you are buying new/used , depending in which part of the world are you. This is my recommended , brand new purchase in Europe.
  • Bitcoin – Most suitable Antminer S17+ . It is one of the efficient Bitcoin miner currently publicly available, alternatives would be M20s miner and Avalon miner 1166. Antminer S17 efficiency is 73TH/s @ 3000watts . Current profitability after you have paid your electric bill is 7.82 usd in 24hours , with ROI achievable in 6-7month. It does seems great, but crypto doesn’t stand still. And has plenty of risks.

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  • Ethereum – Best miner to use is RX5700 graphic cards mining rig. I know there is an ASIC miner available A10, but most of you who are in mining will agree with me, that it is complete junk. It is only slightly more efficient then RX5700 gpu rig in terms of price per hash and watt per hash . But it is 10x more riskier investment in mining rig then buying GPU mining rig. So the efficiency of 12xgpu RX5700 mining rig is 640 mh/s @ 1700watts. Current profitability after you have paid your electric bill is 7.62 usd in 24hours , with ROI achievable in about 20-22 month. Ethereum is one of the underdogs which could perform quite well in 2020 and might reduce your ROI much more faster.

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  • DASH – Lately has been released most efficient DASH miner STU-U6. Asic miners are very risky investment, but sometimes they might be very profitable. The beauty of this miner is that it is quite new model and it is mining profitably DASH , even that DASH is still over 90%down from its all time highs. This miner performance is 420GH/s u/2100 watts. Current profitability after you have paid your electric bill is 8.11 usd in 24hours , with ROI achievable in about 5-6 month.

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These would be my to pick miners for start of 2020. There is big risks in any on these miners as no high reward investment is guaranteed anywhere. I’ll have more detailed explanation of the risks of each of these miners in my next post.
Any miner suggestion, what would be your best choice and why?

Video here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvVYQFJEmnQ&t
submitted by mineshop to gpumining [link] [comments]

What will be your biggest fears and risks to setup mining farm.

What will be your biggest fears and risks to setup mining farm.
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Crypto currency mining is fascinating topic. It is 21st century mining with computer hardware and software. Looking for blocks on the block-chain to be rewarded in crypto currency. To start crypto currency mining business or hobby you have to understand what kind of risks you might face. To start Bitcoin mining you will need and ASIC miner, which is basically bunch of CPUs. This kind of equipment might cost you a lot of capital, so it is a good thing to recognize the risks you might face.
  1. In the early days in Bitcoin mining you could make some profit with your laptop CPU or GPU. These days are long gone, every year new more efficient hardware is been developed. Which makes older hardware obsolete for mining. Meaning that bad timing investment could potentially make your investment worthless.
  2. Hardware failure is very big thing to reduce mining risks. This hardware needs to be run 24/7 to gain the most optimal revenue from mining. Very often these devices/hardware do brake down, asic miners are the worse hardware comparing to GPU. Hashing board failure is common problem on them, which will need additional investment after 6 month from your purchase. If this would happen to your devices.
  3. The one of the hardest parts is not enough profits. Crypto currencies are extremely volatile, one day you could mine in profit the next day you might be at loss. If you are using latest hardware, most important to stay in the game and mine with profit. Is to have cheapest electric rate between all the other miners on network. Electric is everyone biggest OPEX cost, dont even think to start mining as a business large scale if your power costs is above 6-7c a kw/h. It might be profitable to mine with 20c per kw/h today but it might not be anymore tomorrow. Which means you will need to shutdown your mining farm.
  4. Legal risks . Crypto currency is still very new, and it has not been regulated very well. So you might face some kind of crypto currency ban in the country which might affect your mining operation.
  5. Hacking – Use crypto currency safe as possible. You know the good old saying not your keys not your coins. Don’t keep your mined coins on exchange. And use only community trusted mining pools.
  6. And the last of the top 6 is the environmental risk. Choose mining location wisely. Mining hardware most likely will use a lot of power, this is why they will produce a lot of heat. And heat will affect your mining operation. Something like mining container could be an option.
Recognize your risks before starting a mining operation.
Please comment down bellow with any more risks you might think it is worth to mention.
VIDEO - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eNuG04n2zI&feature=youtu.be
submitted by mineshop to gpumining [link] [comments]

My mining story.

First time I heard about bitcoin in 2017. My friends from the Bay Area told me to read about it. I started with googling and watching YouTube videos. It was interesting and I bought a couple of books and divided to crypto history.
From the very first moment I felt that this technology is promising and I was excited about it. While I was looking for ways to buy bitcoin, the price was climbing up every week. So, I decided to research more until the end of the year and not to rush.
After I read about mining, I was thinking about how to set up my own rig. I found a local guy who promised to help, but there wasn’t any single GPU on the market. To get 6 for set up you had to wait for a month and pay too much. Antminers at that time cost more than $4500 per unit from resellers.
It was really crazy times. So I didn’t find an adequate way to enter the market and decided to wait. While waiting I watched dozens of YouTube videos on mining and read a lot of articles. Till the moment I first bought my miners I was consuming knowledge.
And finally, in May 2018, I bought my first 20 ASICs. I immediately launched them at my friend's place. In the beginning, there was a problem with the hash rate, as we were still learning how to set up proper internet and power supply. In practice, we were intensively improving the facility, as we wanted to get maximum out of mining.
After a month and a half we decided to expand and made bulk order directly to Bitmain. Prices dropped nearly 35%, so we thought it was a good idea to buy more, as we gained experience with facility management. At the same time, my friends asked me whether I can host and manage miners for them if they buy some. I said yes, but offered a fee for hosting.
That’s how my hosting business started. And it grew rapidly since that time. As not only my friends were interested, but later I met a lot of international miners, who came to my country in search of cheap electricity. I started to think globally and understood the existing problem on the market. As prices of crypto declined significantly, in many places mining became unprofitable. That caused the migration of mining equipment to cheaper places.
Expansion of hosting forced me to rent a separate facility and connect 2 MW from power plant directly. That was made to decrease electricity price and operational costs, which in turns resulted in even cheaper rates for hosting. Sometimes my international potential clients cannot believe how can I provide such cheap hosting fee. Even here some people in comments say it is a scam. But the reality is that the level of life is so low, that this cheap electricity is really expensive for locals. Not everybody lives and gains salaries like in EU or USA.
The biggest challenge for crypto mining now is finding ways to make it more efficient and decentralized. Many companies building huge mining farms in locations without gaining access to the cheapest electricity. Big companies gaining more strength which lead to more centralized mining. I prefer having a lot of different miners all over the world, instead of, for example, Bitmain controlling 40-50% of hash power.
In the end, we all must contribute and try to improve the beauty of crypto.
submitted by shaborli to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Profitability: How Long Does it Take to Mine One Bitcoin in 2019?

When it comes to Bitcoin (BTC) mining, the major questions on people’s minds are “how profitable is Bitcoin mining” and “how long would it take to mine one Bitcoin?” To answer these questions, we need to take an in-depth look at the current state of the Bitcoin mining industry — and how it has changed — over the last several years.
Bitcoin mining is, essentially, the process of participating in Bitcoin’s underlying security mechanism — known as proof-of-work — to help secure the Bitcoin blockchain. In return, participants receive compensation in bitcoins (BTC).
When you participate in Bitcoin mining, you are essentially searching for blocks by crunching complex cryptographic challenges using your mining hardware. Once a block is discovered, new transactions are recorded and verified within the block and the block discoverer receives the block rewards — currently set at 12.5 BTC — as well as the transactions fees for the transactions included within the block.
Once the maximum supply of 21 million Bitcoins has been mined, no further Bitcoins will ever come into existence. This property makes Bitcoin deflationary, something which many argue will inevitably increase the value of each Bitcoin unit as it becomes more scarce due to increased global adoption.
The limited supply of Bitcoin is also one of the reasons why Bitcoin mining has become so popular. In previous years, Bitcoin mining proved to be a lucrative investment option — netting miners with several fold returns on their investment with relatively little effort.
bitcoin mining hardware
Mining Hardware
The mining hardware you choose will mostly depend on your circumstances — in terms of budget, location and electricity costs. Since the amount of hashing power you can dedicate to the mining process is directly correlated with how much Bitcoin you will mine per day, it is wise to ensure your hardware is still competitive in 2019.
Bitcoin uses SHA256 as its mining algorithm. Because of this, only hardware compatible with this algorithm can be used to mine Bitcoin. Although it is technically possible to mine Bitcoin on your current computer hardware — using your CPU or GPU — this will almost certainly not generate a positive return on your investment and you may end up damaging your device.
The most cost-effective way to mine Bitcoin in 2019 is using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) mining hardware. These are specially-designed machines that offer much higher performance per watt than typical computers and have been an absolutely essential purchase for anybody looking to get into Bitcoin mining since the first Avalon ASICs were shipped in 2013.
When it comes to selecting Bitcoin mining hardware, there are several main parameters to consider — though the importance of each of these may vary based on personal circumstances and budget.
Performance per Watt
When it comes to Bitcoin mining, performance per watt is a measure of how many gigahashes per watt a machine is capable of and is, hence, a simple measure of its efficiency. Since electricity costs are likely to be one of the largest expenses when mining Bitcoin, it is usually a good idea to ensure that you are getting good performance per watt out of your hardware.
Ideally, your mining hardware would be highly efficient, allowing it to mine Bitcoin with lower energy requirements — though this will need to be balanced with acquisition costs, as often the most efficient hardware is also the most expensive. This means it may take longer to see a return on investment.
In countries with cheap electricity, performance per watt is often less of a concern than acquisition costs and price-performance ratio. In most countries, operating outdated mining hardware is typically cost prohibitive, as energy costs outweigh the income generated by the mining equipment.
However, this may not be the case for those operating in countries with extremely cheap electricity — such as Kuwait and Venezuela — as even older equipment can still be profitable. Similarly, miners with a free energy surplus, such as from wind or solar electric generators, can benefit from the minimal gains offered by still running outdated hardware.
Longevity
The lifetime of mining hardware also plays a critical role in determining how profitable your mining venture will be. It’s always a good idea to do whatever possible to ensure it runs as smoothly as possible.
Since mining equipment tends to run at a full (or almost full) load for extended periods, they also tend to break down and fail more frequently than most electronics — which can seriously damage your profitability. Equipment failure is even more common when purchasing second-hand equipment. Since warranty claims are often challenging, it can often take a long time to receive a warranty replacement.
Price-Performance Ratio
In many cases, one of the major criteria used to select mining hardware is the price-performance ratio — a measure of how much performance a machine outputs per unit price. In the case of cryptocurrency mining hardware, this is commonly expressed as gigahashes per dollar or GH/$.
Under ideal circumstances, the mining hardware would have a high price-performance ratio, ensuring you get a lot of bang for your buck. However, this must also be considered in combination with the acquisition costs and the expected lifetime of the machine — since the absolute most powerful machines are not always the cheapest or the most energy efficient.
Acquisition Costs
Acquisition costs are almost always the biggest barrier to entry for most Bitcoin miners since most top-end mining hardware costs several thousand dollars. This problem is further compounded by the fact that many hardware manufacturers offer discounts for bulk purchases, allowing those with deeper pockets to achieve a better price-performance ratio.
Acquisition costs include all the costs involved in purchasing any mining equipment, including hardware costs, shipping costs, import duties, and any further costs. For example, many ASIC miners do not include a power supply — which can be another considerable expense, since the 1,000W+ power supplies usually required tend to cost several hundred dollars alone.
Ensuring your equipment runs smoothly can also add in additional costs, such as cooling and maintenance expenses. In addition, some miners may want to invest in uninterruptible power supplies to ensure their hardware keeps running — even if the power fails temporarily.
asic mining
Current Generation Hardware
One of the most recent additions to the Bitcoin mining hardware market is the Ebang Ebit E11++, which was released in October 2018. Using a 10nm fabrication process for its processors, the Ebit E11++ is able to achieve one of the highest hash rates on the market at 44TH/s.
In terms of efficiency, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is arguably the best on the market, offering 44TH/s of hash rate while drawing just 1,980W of power, offering 22.2GH/W performance. However, as of writing, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is out of stock until March 31, 2019 — while its price of $2,024 (excluding shipping) may make it prohibitively expensive for those first getting involved with Bitcoin mining.
Another popular choice is the ASICminer 8 Nano, a machine released in October 2018 that offers 44TH/s for $3,900 excluding shipping. The ASICminer 8 Nano draws 2,100W of power, giving it an efficiency of almost 21GH/W — slightly lower than the Ebit E11++ while costing almost double the price. However, unlike the E11++, the 8 Nano is actually in stock and available to purchase.
ASICminer also offers the 8 Nano Pro, a machine launched in mid-2018 that offers 80 TH/s of hash rate for $9,500 (excluding shipping). However, unlike the Ebit E11++ and 8 Nano, the minimum order quantity for the 8 Nano Pro is curiously set at five, meaning you will need to lay out a minimum of $47,500 in order to actually get your hands on one (or five).
While the 8 Nano Pro doesn’t offer the same performance per watt as the Ebit E11+ or AICMiner 8 Nano, it is one of the quieter miners on this list, making it more suitable for a home or office environment. That being said, the ASICminer 8 Nano Pro is easily the most expensive miner per TH on this list — costing a whopping $118.75/TH, compared to the $46/TH offered by the E11++ and $88.64 offered by the 8 Nano.
The latest hardware on this list is the Innosilicon T3 43T, which is currently available for pre-order at $2,279, and estimated to ship in March 2019. Offering 43TH/s of performance at 2,100W, the T3 43T comes in at an efficiency of 20.4GH/W, which is around 10 percent less energy efficient than the Ebit E11++.
The T3 43T also has a minimum order quantity of three units, making the minimum acquisition cost $6837 + shipping for preorders. All in all, the T3 43T is more costly and less efficient than the E11++ but may arrive slightly earlier since Ebang will not ship the E11++ units until at least end March 29, 2019.
Finally, this list would not be complete without including Bitmain’s latest offering, the Antminer S15-28TH/s, which — as its name suggests — offers 28TH/s of hash power while drawing just under 1600W at the wall. The Antminer S15 is one of the only SHA256 miners to use 7nm processors, making it somewhat smaller than some of the other devices on this list.
Like most pieces of top-end Bitcoin mining hardware, the Antminer S15 27TH/s model is currently sold out, with current orders not shipping until mid-February 2019. However, the S15 is offered at a significantly lower price than many of its competitors at just $1020 (excluding shipping), with no minimum quantity restriction. At these rates, the Antminer comes in at just $37.78/TH — though its energy efficiency is a much less impressive 17.5GH/W.
Mining Hardware Mining Hardware Comparison
Performance (GH/W) Price Performance Ratio ($/TH)
Ebang Ebit E11++ 22.2GH/W $46/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano 21GH/W $88.64/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano Pro 19GH/W $118.75/TH
Innosilicon T3 43T 20.4GH/W $53/TH
Antminer S15-28TH/s 17.5GH/W $37.78/TH
How To Select a Good Mining Pool
Mining pools are platforms that allow miners to pool their resources together to achieve a higher collective hash rate — which, in turn, allows the collective to mine more blocks than they would be able to achieve alone.
Typically, these mining pools will distribute block rewards to contributing miners based on the proportion of the hash rate they supply. If a pool contributing a total of 20 TH/s of hash rate successfully mines the next block, a user responsible for 10 percent of this hash rate will receive 10 percent of the 12.5 BTC reward.
Pools essentially allow smaller miners to compete with large private mining organizations by ensuring that the collective hash rate is high enough to successfully mine blocks on regular basis. Without operating through a mining pool, many miners would be unlikely to discover any blocks at all — due to only contributing a tiny fraction of the overall Bitcoin hash rate.
While it is quite possible to be successful mining without a pool, this typically requires an extremely large mining operation and is usually not recommended — unless you have enough hash rate to mine blocks on a regular basis.
Although it is technically possible to discover blocks mining solo and keep the entire 12.5 BTC reward for yourself, the odds of this actually occurring are practically zero — making pool collaboration practically the only way to compete in 2019 and beyond.
Selecting the best pool for you can be a challenging job since the vast majority of pools are quite similar and offer similar features and comparable fees. Because of this, we have broken down the qualities you should be looking for in a new pool into four categories; reputation, hash rate, pool fees, and usability/features:
Reputation
The reputation of a pool is one of the most important factors in selecting the pool that is best for you. Well-reputed pools will tend to be much larger than newer or less well-established pools since few pools with a poor reputation can stand the test of time.
Well-reputed pools also tend to be more transparent about their operation, many of which provide tools to ensure that each user is getting the correct reward based on the hash rate contributed. By using only pools with a great reputation, you also ensure your hash rate is not being used for nefarious purposes — such as powering a 51 percent attack.
When comparing a list of pools that appear suitable for you, it is a wise move to read their user reviews before making your choice — ensuring you don’t end up mining at a pool that steals your hard-fought earnings.
Hash Rate
When it comes to mining Bitcoin, the probability of discovering the next block is directly related to the amount of hashing power you contribute to the network. Because of this, one of the major features you should be considering when selecting your pool is its total hash rate — which is often closely related to the proportion of new blocks mined by the pool
Since the total hash rate of a pool is directly related to how quickly it discovers new blocks, this means the largest pools tend to discover a relative majority of blocks — leading to more regular rewards. However, the very largest pools also tend the have higher fees but often make up for this with sheer success and additional features.
Sometimes, some of the largest pools have a minimum hash rate requirement ù leaving some of the smaller miners left out of the loop. Although smaller pools typically have more relaxed requirements with reduced performance thresholds, these pools may be only slightly more profitable than mining solo.
Pool Fees
When choosing a suitable pool, typically one of the major considerations is its fees. Typically, most pools will charge a small fee that is deducted from your earnings and is usually around 1-2 percent — but sometimes slightly lower or higher.
There are also pools that offer 0 percent fees. However, these are often much smaller than the major pools and tend to make their money in a different way — such as through monthly subscriptions or donations.
Ideally, you will choose the pool that offers the best balance of fees to other features. Usually, the pool with the absolute lowest fees is not the best choice. Additionally, pools with the lowest fees often have the highest withdrawal minimums — making pool hopping uneconomical for most.
Usability and Features
When first starting out with Bitcoin mining, learning how to set up a pool and navigating through the settings can be a challenge. Because of this, several pools target their services to newer users by offering a simple to navigate user interface and providing detailed learning resources and prompt customer support.
However, for more experienced miners, simple pools don’t tend to offer a variety of features needed to maximize profitability. For example, although many mining pools focus their entire hash rate towards mining a single cryptocurrency, some are large enough to offer additional options — allowing users to mine other SHA256 coins such as Bitcoin Cash (BCH) or Fantom if they choose.
These pools are technically more challenging to use and mostly designed for those familiar with mining, happy to hop from coin to coin mining whichever is most profitable at the time. There are even some exchanges that automatically direct their combined hash rate at the most profitable cryptocurrency — taking the guesswork out of the equation.
bitcoin mining pool
Best Mining Pools for 2019
The Bitcoin mining pool industry has a large number of players, but the vast majority of the Bitcoin hash rate is concentrated within just a few pools. Currently, there are dozens of suitable pools to choose from — but we have selected just a few of the best to help get you started on your journey.
Slushpool was the first Bitcoin mining pool released, being launched way back in 2010 under the name “Bitcoin Pooled Mining Server.” Since then, Slushpool has grown into one of the most popular pools around — currently accounting for just under 10 percent of the total Bitcoin hash rate.
Although Slushpool isn’t one of the very largest pools, it does offer a newbie-friendly interface alongside more advanced features for those that need them. The pool has moderately high fees of 2 percent but offers servers in several countries — including the U.S., Europe, China, and Japan — giving it a good balance of fees to features.
BTC.com is another potential candidate for your pool and currently stands as the largest public Bitcoin mining pool. It is responsible for mining around 17 percent of new blocks. Being the largest public mining pool provides users with a sense of security, ensuring blocks are mined regularly and a stable income is made.
Image courtesy of Blockchain.info.
BTC.com is owned by Bitmain, a company that manufacturers mining hardware, and charges a 1.5 percent fees — placing it squarely in the middle-tier in terms of fees. Unlike other platforms, BTC.com uses its own payment structure known as FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), which means miners also receive a share of the transaction fees included within mined blocks — making it slightly more profitable than standard payment per share (PPS) pools.
Another great option is Antpool, a mining pool that supports mining services for 10 different cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, Litecoin (LTC) and Ethereum (ETH). AntPool frequently trades places with BTC.com as the largest Bitcoin mining pool. However, as of this writing, it occupies the title of the third-largest public mining pool.
What sets Antpool apart from other pools is the ability to choose your own fee system — including PPS, PPS+, and PPLNS. If you choose PPLNS, using Antpool is free but you will not receive any transaction fees from any blocks mined. Antpool also offers regular payouts and has a low minimum payout of just 0.001 BTC, making it suitable for smaller miners.
Last on the list of the best Bitcoin mining pools in 2019 is the Bitcoin.com mining pool. Although this is one of the smaller pools available, the Bitcoin.com pool has some redeeming features that make it worth a look. It offers mining contracts, allowing you to test out Bitcoin mining before investing in mining equipment of your own. According to Bitcoin.com, they are the highest paying Pay Per Share (PPS) pool in the world, offering up to 98 percent block rewards as well as automatic switching between BTC and BCH mining to optimize profitability.

Electricity Costs
While your mining hardware is most important when it comes to how much BTC you can earn when mining, your electricity costs are usually the largest additional expense. With electricity costs often varying dramatically between countries, ensuring you are on the best cost-per-KWh plan available will help to keep costs down when mining.
Most commonly, large mining operations will be set up in countries where electricity costs are the lowest — such as Iceland, India, and Ukraine. Since China has one of the lowest energy costs in the world, it was previously the epicenter of Bitcoin mining. However, since the government began cracking down on cryptocurrencies, it has largely fallen out of favor with miners.
Technically, Venezuela is one of the cheapest countries in the world in terms of electricity, with the government heavily subsidizing these energy costs — while Bitcoin offers an escape from the hyperinflation suffered by the Venezuelan bolivar. Despite this, importing mining hardware into the country is a costly endeavor, making it impractical for many people.
Finding ways to lower your electricity costs is one of the best ways to improve your mining profitability. This can include investing in renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, or wind — which can yield increased profitability over the long term.
if you are looking to buy bitcoin mining equipment here is some links:

Model Antminer S17 Pro (56Th) from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 56Th/s for a power consumption of 2385W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s17-pro-56th-copy/?wpam_id=17
Model Antminer S9K from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 14Th/s for a power consumption of 1323W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s9k-14-th-s/?wpam_id=17
Model T2T 30Tfrom Innosilicon mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 30Th/s for a power consumption of 2200W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/innosilicon-t2t-30t/?wpam_id=17
mining wholesale website:
https://miningwholesale.eu/?wpam_id=17
submitted by mohamadk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My estimate of 51% attack cost on BURST

Someone wants to perform a 51% attack on Einsteinium.
Because I think that is not cool (not because of the moral aspect, but because it is a very easy task), I cordially invited him to try Burst.
51% attack susceptibility of small PoW coins is a well-known and long-standing problem. Since the attacks on Bitcoin Gold - classified as 'rare' by Forbes - and Verge we know it's not just theoretical.
https://www.crypto51.app/ lists the theoretical cost for several PoW cryptocurrencies. There you also can see why I consider an attack on Einsteinium a very easy task.
So we all believe Burst is pretty resistant to 51% attacks - but how resistant exactly? Here's my stab at it:
First off, there is no such thing as "cost per 1h", because you have the upfront cost and time required to plot. I will assume some exceptionally talented and well funded hacker group could pull it off in 1 month at slightly lower cost than I was able to find. 1 month seems to be the minimum one can find in storage rentals.
Therefore:
1 Month of 240 Petabyte of storage space: ~$5033165 (based on AWS S3 standard storage - not infrequent access - for "more than 500TB requirement" this is listed at $0.021 per GB per month, so I assumed $0.02 * 1024 * 240 * 1024)
The capacity to plot this space within 1 month I base on the luxurious PMR 10TB Ironwolfs, not some SMR disks. If I assume each disk to be potentially plotted at its max speed (~ 220 MB/s) within 14 hours, I have 2 choices:
240 PiB in 10TB Ironwolfs is 27007 HDDs If a batch needs 14hours and I need to be finished in 715 hours, I have 51 sequential batches at most. Meaning, I need to plot roughly 530 HDDs per batch
Plotting at 220 MB/s meaning 225280 KB/s, or 13516800 KB/min - meaning 52800 nonces/min
Let's assume a p2.8xlarge AWS instance could plot 16 HDDs at once, we would need 34 such instances each priced $7.2/hour, meaning $245/h this would leave us at surprisingly low $175175 plotting cost
Total cost: $5208340
If I choose to go for the ASAP plotting, I would need 1688 p2.8xlarge instances for 2 hours (if you want 1 hour of pure compute time, there is setup time and then you pay for each started hour) meaning even lower $24308.
Total cost: $5057473
I'm making here lots of assumptions in favor of the hacking endeavor. Like:
So my best case (for the hacker) scenario is $5M cost of a 1h 51% attack on Burstcoin.
If the person would choose to mine and sell the Burst before the attack, he could theoretically have mined 1.74 million Burst in the "slow plot" case, representing $17400. This could either be subtracted from the total cost or assumed to have been paid for all the adverse events (for the hacker) that'd were likely to occur in such an attack scenario
In the "fast plot case" mining revenue would be roughly double of that: ~$34800
What was surprising for me, that the cost for plotting is not the major component, but that it's actually the capacity that puts a big barrier in there. On the other hand, if you think about it, it makes sense.
$5M attack cost on a $20M coin makes this attack expensive by 25% of the MktCap. Bitcoin has an attack cost of around $512,349 per hour, which is 0.00045028505054496202% of the MktCap
Of course the protection of Bitcoin results from the fact that there is no one available who had the material to rent you that capacity for 1 hour.
Still, you read right: in absolute numbers, it is 10 times more expensive to attack Burstcoin, than it is to attack Bitcoin. In relative numbers (profitability), Burstcoin would be a more than 55000 times more bitter pill than Bitcoin.
I really tried not to make Burstcoin look nicer here. No one is helped if we would hide behind some delusions of some grand protection. These numbers are about as good as my estimate gets for now and I am aware they may look "too good to be true" (as did the 500 000 more energy efficient numbers at first).
You are also cordially invited to refute these numbers.
edit:
You can actually vote (not for a final verdict, just to get the general sentiment) if the Burst community as such should officially challenge anyone to try: https://twitter.com/PoC_Consortium/status/1049238312714682369
submitted by therico666 to burstcoin [link] [comments]

With all this fork drama and FUD happening, Vertcoin is the safe heaven with great potential to become the next major cryptocurrency

Before anyone starts pointing out that this is another "dumb shilling post", hear me out.
I strongly believe that Vertcoin could become the next top 10 major cryptocurrency.
2017 was and STILL IS a bloodbath in cryptoworld. All the Bitcoin forks, FUD, and heavy manipulation discouraged many crypto investors to dive in further. Suppressing our community as a whole to progress through this brave new world. Some of you may have FOMO'd (fear of missing out) or fell into the hands of deceptions like Bitconnect and lost quite a bit of your hard-earned money. Let the emotions aside, Vertcoin will and IS going to be the next major player in the crypto market. Here are some basic reasons why Vertcoin will reach that level.
  1. VTC is the ASIC-resistant coin and more people will care. Why? Let me explain ASIC mining has been concentrated into relatively centralized data centers operated by professionals which makes it less decentralized consensus. Instead of any random person, using a relatively powerful computer, you are dependent upon only people who are advanced enough to operate specialized ASIC hardware and who buy it from handful of companies that can distribute the hardware however they please and to some extent for whatever price they please because the demand is high. Hence, we need those coins whose algorithm shows “resistance” to ASIC hardware and the only coin who is extremely committed to remain ASIC resistance is Vertcoin. The reason is that it has not only memory intensive algorithm (Lyra2Rev2) which makes it particularly difficult to develop an ASIC in the future but it has proved in the past (by hard forking) that if someone tried to make ASICs for vertcoin; it will hard fork to remain ASIC resistant and hence “the people’s coin. https://coinpupil.com/2017/10/17/introduction-vertcoin-asic-resistant-cryptocurrency/.
  2. VTC is the cheapest of the BTC/LTC/VTC trio and yet has a comparable social following to LTC. (In the future, sooner or later, atomic swaps between BTC/LTC/VTC will be available, allowing the three coins to exchange for each other immediately for free without needing a medium, ex. 3rd party exchanges like Bittrex)
  3. If trading volume is a strong indicator of value, and I believe it is, VTC is crazy undervalued
  4. VTC is an old coin (Jan 2014) with a large base of people who know it by name. Hence, it's foundation is solid.
  5. Thank's to it's strong and genuine community, Vertcoin's reputation is highly regarded. To the point that even many Pump and Dump groups see this coin as a legit, solid crypto that has a strong potential.
  6. Transaction speed is nearly instant as well as the fee is very cheap (0.02VTC).
  7. Extremely active developers. But what's important is that they are genuine. You can chat with them and will reply to you in discord chat. They will let you know what is going on and what is going to happen without covering it up.
Pros aside, it is no doubt that Vertcoin is or at least used to be the target of manipulation. However, Vertcoin had survived all the heavy manipulations. In fact, it helped Vertcoin to build a stronger ground, higher lows and higher highs. At this point, Vertcoin is extremely difficult to be manipulated largely due to it's enormous increase in volume and well-liked community throughout the cryptoworld. Go ask anyone who knows about cryptos if Vertcoin is a solid coin. Yes, there are some minorities who will dislike Vertcoin. But overall, most people will say yes.
Here are the future updates on Vertcoin. 1. Atomic Swaps - exchange of one cryptocurrency to another cryptocurrency, without the need to trust a third-party. 2. Block halving (estimated to be around December 11-12th) - It cut's the block reward to the miners by half. A potential price catalyst. 3. Stealth Addresses - A traditional bank account is based on a private ledger in which the transaction history is only known to the account holder and the bank. In such a system the account holder can widely distribute his/her account number and receive any number of payments without exposing the account history to the payers or casual observers. This is essentially what is accomplished with stealth addresses, without sacrificing the decentralization of the currency. 4. AMD Miner - Currently, Vertcoin's one click miner (you can literally download the program, type in the address, and click! All those VTC's will flow into your wallet) doesn't do well with AMD graphic cards. Therefore, all the AMD miners are still left out. As soon as AMD Miner releases (by this year), it will greatly increase Vertcoin's hash power. Theoretically doubling the current hashpower instantly because there are only 2 consumer GPU markets, AMD and Nvidia. 5. Wallets - Yes Vertcoin does not support many wallets but it is in progress. iOS mobile wallet and as well as many more wallets will be supported very soon (upcoming patch I believe) 6. Ethereum switching from Proof of Work to Proof of Stake. Meaning that it will leave a lot of orphan ETH GPU miners coming to VTC. **All of this upcoming updates should be completed by end of this year.
Currently, cryptoworld is like the 1984's internet (netscape) era. Back then, there were lots of speculations and panic. In the next year or so, scam ICO's will be eliminated as well as many other shady coins like beeeconneecctt. Vertcoin and as well as some other solid coins will survive this bloodbath and become one of the top contenders in the crypto market.
Special thanks to @theBARBARIC and @Mo9731 for some details.
Thank You.
submitted by TDKOtherSide to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

With all this fork drama and FUD happening, Vertcoin is the safe heaven with great potential to become the next major cryptocurrency

Before anyone starts pointing out that this is another "dumb shilling post", hear me out.
I strongly believe that Vertcoin could become the next top 10 major cryptocurrency.
2017 was and STILL IS a bloodbath in cryptoworld. All the Bitcoin forks, FUD, and heavy manipulation discouraged many crypto investors to dive in further. Suppressing our community as a whole to progress through this brave new world. Some of you may have FOMO'd (fear of missing out) or fell into the hands of deceptions like Bitconnect and lost quite a bit of your hard-earned money. Let the emotions aside, Vertcoin will and IS going to be the next major player in the crypto market. Here are some basic reasons why Vertcoin will reach that level.
  1. VTC is the ASIC-resistant coin and more people will care. Why? Let me explain ASIC mining has been concentrated into relatively centralized data centers operated by professionals which makes it less decentralized consensus. Instead of any random person, using a relatively powerful computer, you are dependent upon only people who are advanced enough to operate specialized ASIC hardware and who buy it from handful of companies that can distribute the hardware however they please and to some extent for whatever price they please because the demand is high. Hence, we need those coins whose algorithm shows “resistance” to ASIC hardware and the only coin who is extremely committed to remain ASIC resistance is Vertcoin. The reason is that it has not only memory intensive algorithm (Lyra2Rev2) which makes it particularly difficult to develop an ASIC in the future but it has proved in the past (by hard forking) that if someone tried to make ASICs for vertcoin; it will hard fork to remain ASIC resistant and hence “the people’s coin. https://coinpupil.com/2017/10/17/introduction-vertcoin-asic-resistant-cryptocurrency/.
  2. VTC is the cheapest of the BTC/LTC/VTC trio and yet has a comparable social following to LTC. (In the future, sooner or later, atomic swaps between BTC/LTC/VTC will be available, allowing the three coins to exchange for each other immediately for free without needing a medium, ex. 3rd party exchanges like Bittrex)
  3. If trading volume is a strong indicator of value, and I believe it is, VTC is crazy undervalued
  4. VTC is an old coin (Jan 2014) with a large base of people who know it by name. Hence, it's foundation is solid.
  5. Thank's to it's strong and genuine community, Vertcoin's reputation is highly regarded. To the point that even many Pump and Dump groups see this coin as a legit, solid crypto that has a strong potential.
  6. Transaction speed is nearly instant as well as the fee is very cheap (0.02VTC).
  7. Extremely active developers. But what's important is that they are genuine. You can chat with them and will reply to you in discord chat. They will let you know what is going on and what is going to happen without covering it up.
Pros aside, it is no doubt that Vertcoin is or at least used to be the target of manipulation. However, Vertcoin had survived all the heavy manipulations. In fact, it helped Vertcoin to build a stronger ground, higher lows and higher highs. At this point, Vertcoin is extremely difficult to be manipulated largely due to it's enormous increase in volume and well-liked community throughout the cryptoworld. Go ask anyone who knows about cryptos if Vertcoin is a solid coin. Yes, there are some minorities who will dislike Vertcoin. But overall, most people will say yes.
Here are the future updates on Vertcoin. 1. Atomic Swaps - exchange of one cryptocurrency to another cryptocurrency, without the need to trust a third-party. 2. Block halving (estimated to be around December 11-12th) - It cut's the block reward to the miners by half. A potential price catalyst. 3. Stealth Addresses - A traditional bank account is based on a private ledger in which the transaction history is only known to the account holder and the bank. In such a system the account holder can widely distribute his/her account number and receive any number of payments without exposing the account history to the payers or casual observers. This is essentially what is accomplished with stealth addresses, without sacrificing the decentralization of the currency. 4. AMD Miner - Currently, Vertcoin's one click miner (you can literally download the program, type in the address, and click! All those VTC's will flow into your wallet) doesn't do well with AMD graphic cards. Therefore, all the AMD miners are still left out. As soon as AMD Miner releases (by this year), it will greatly increase Vertcoin's hash power. Theoretically doubling the current hashpower instantly because there are only 2 consumer GPU markets, AMD and Nvidia. 5. Wallets - Yes Vertcoin does not support many wallets but it is in progress. iOS mobile wallet and as well as many more wallets will be supported very soon (upcoming patch I believe) 6. Ethereum switching from Proof of Work to Proof of Stake. Meaning that it will leave a lot of orphan ETH GPU miners coming to VTC. **All of this upcoming updates should be completed by end of this year.
Currently, cryptoworld is like the 1984's internet (netscape) era. Back then, there were lots of speculations and panic. In the next year or so, scam ICO's will be eliminated as well as many other shady coins like beeeconneecctt. Vertcoin and as well as some other solid coins will survive this bloodbath and become one of the top contenders in the crypto market.
Special thanks to @theBARBARIC and @Mo9731 for some details.
Thank You.
submitted by TDKOtherSide to vertcoin [link] [comments]

5 most promising Altcoins for long-term investments | Coinscapture

5 most promising Altcoins for long-term investments | Coinscapture

After the success of Bitcoin and the rise in the price of the first-ever cryptocurrency, many new coins were developed in cryptoworld. In simple words, any coin other than bitcoin is termed as “Altcoins”. These coins are created by tweaking the Bitcoin's or any other existing cryptocurrencies protocol. In the growing world of cryptocurrency, there are more than 3000 cryptocurrencies which came into existence and so it is a tough job to choose the right Altcoin to invest in it. Here are the 5 most promising Altcoins that can help you to narrow your search.
Disclaimer: This guide should not be considered as financial advice. It is highly recommended to do appropriate market research before any investments.

Litecoin

After the successful launch of Bitcoin, Litecoin was the next one to enter the Cryptoworld in 2011. Charlie Lee - a computer scientist created Litecoin by making some technical changes in the bitcoin’s source-code and made it the fastest peer-to-peer currency that enabled instant, near-zero cost payments to anyone across the world. Also, litecoin has a total supply of 84 million with an average block mining time of 2.5 minutes.

Reasons why to choose Litecoin as a Long-Term Investment

  • Improved: Litecoin algorithm is generally easier to mine but difficult to crack The bitcoin mining is highly processed intensive requiring, application-specific integrated circuit devices with high processing capabilities, while Litecoin mining is memory-intensive requiring less cost-intensive graphics processing units (GPU).
  • Faster block-processing rate: The technical changes done on Bitcoin’s source-code allows Litecoin to processes a block at a much faster rate and giving out rewards to the miner faster in every 2.5 minutes as compared to Bitcoin which processes a block in every 10 minutes. Litecoin network have more capacity to handle the transactions than bitcoin's network
  • SegWit upgrade: Litecoin's SegWit upgrade boost the capacity of the number of transactions a block can hold in litecoin's blockchain, thereby speeding up the transaction settlement times and lowering transaction costs.
  • Higher trading volume: The trading of Litecoin has begun since 2011 and since then it was in the top 10 list of coins. The popularity of Litecoins is so much that you won't face any problem selling them in the future which brings less fear of having risk as compared to other new coins.

Ethereum

Ethereum is the second-largest digital currency introduces Vitalik Buterin in late 2015. It has been a popular choice in many industries as its cool feature named Smart Contracts helps developers to build decentralized applications (dApps) on top of its (i.e. Ethereum's) blockchain which helps to avoid fraud, downtime, and control or interference from a third party. Ethereum can also be used for banking and financial service contracts, ICOS, prediction markets, replacing escrow, identity management. The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance founded in 2017 has over 200 organizations that are testing on various versions of Ethereum's blockchain in different industries. Ethereum has a circulating supply of 106,376,346 ETH, the market capitalization of $26,307, 580,992 and faster transaction of 6 minutes as compared to Bitcoin.

Reasons why to choose Ethereum as a Long-Term Investment

  • Multi-purpose usage- Other than trading Ethereum can be used for ICOs, prediction markets, building tokens and many more ways that very few cryptocurrencies can do as good as Ethereum.
  • Safety: The apps built on Ethereum’s blockchain termed as dApps or decentralized apps are significantly safer and more resistant to hacking than the software you use now.
  • Smart contracts: The smart contract feature offers significant business benefits over more traditional conventional forms of cloud computing and transaction-clearing.
  • Initial Coin Offerings: Ethereum is used ICOs (Initial Coin Offerings) that means it acts as a launchpad for new tokens which thereby makes it a valuable platform and price will increase with its use.

Ripple

Ripple is the hot choice in banking and financial institutions as it can be used as an intermediary for quick transaction-processing and settlement service; allowing to transact directly and instantly across national borders. XRP currently has a fast transaction processing time of about 4 seconds and a cheap transaction fee about $0.004 per transaction (which is less than half a cent). It has a circulating supply of 42,181,995,112 and a market capitalization of around 17 billion USD.

Reasons why to choose Ripple as a Long-Term Investment

  • Well distributed: Ripple is an open-source technology, built on the principles of blockchain with an increasing set of validators.
  • Highly Scalable: XRP has the potential to handle 1,500 transactions per second, 24x7, and can scale to deal with a similar throughput as Visa.
  • Highly Stable: The most stable record of Ripple makes it ready for institutional and enterprise use.
  • Global Bank partners: Ripple has partnered with over 100 banks like Bank of America, UBS, Standard Chartered, Barclays, JP Morgan, Santander, and American Express.

Stellar

Stellar offers the fastest and the cheapest online payment and cross-border payment services as compared to the other large companies. Also, it does not use proof of work verification which is time and energy consuming which allows processing a transaction in approx 5 seconds. It has a market capitalization of $2,378,213,121 and a circulating supply of 19.331,689,641.

Reasons why to choose Stellar as a Long-Term Investment

  • Low-cost transactions: Stellar’s payment protocol prioritizes profit, the low transaction time and high operational efficiency translates to a lower cost of transactions.
  • Currency exchanger: Stellar’s platform also acts as a currency exchanger between government-backed currencies, such as dollars to euros.
  • Creating tokens: Launching a token on the Stellar platform is super easy because of the simple programming.
  • Tech elements: Stellar can integrate with elements such as blockchain smart contracts, and multi signatures that enhances the functionality of the payment protocol

Binance Coin

Binance coin is the official coin of the Binance platform that offers a stage for trading cryptocurrencies. Binance is soon launching its own decentralized exchange, Binance DEX that would be available on all platforms, such as Windows, Linux, Mac OS, iOS and Android. BNB has a market capitalization of 4 billion USD and a circulating supply of 141,175,490.

Reasons why to choose Binance Coin a Long-Term Investment

  • Discounts: BNB can be used not only to pay сommissions for transactions on the exchange and also to get additional discounts for each purchase and exchange via Binance
  • Team: BNB has a great team that is ambitious and experienced in the cryptocurrency world
  • Referrals: BNB coin offers a smart referral scheme which attracts many users and thereby grows the platform’s adoption
  • Loyalty: BNB coin is the only cryptocurrency that rewards customers for their loyalty and creating a fair ecosystem within Binance
    https://coinscapture.com/blog/5-most-promising-altcoins-for-long-term-investments
submitted by coinscapturecom to u/coinscapturecom [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
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Why The ‘Wretched of the World’ Need the Eloncity Blockchain for Energy

Why The ‘Wretched of the World’ Need the Eloncity Blockchain for Energy
We know about how blockchain technology is revolutionizing the peer to peer transfer of value, creating immutable and transparent records and changing many aspects of our lives in ways that are simply revolutionary.

But there is no human for that matter, that doesn’t use electricity.

In fact, most blockchains survive on the misuse of electricity. And most of this electricity is generated from fossil fuels, a phenomenon that speeds up the degradation of our environment.

Can Blockchain be used to provide affordable renewable electricity for all?


https://preview.redd.it/xnz5htsp3sh11.png?width=606&format=png&auto=webp&s=9868fce1374b5ad72607799f03b81df924768616
Well, Eloncity proposes to do just that!
Let us find out how

The History of Electrical Engineering

From the time Thales of Miletus, an ancient Greek Philosopher discovered static electricity at around 600 BC, electrical engineering has undergone many revolutions to become one of the most comprehensive engineering feats accomplished by humanity.
However, electrical possibilities remained an intellectual curiosity for millennia, until the 17th century when scientists like William Gilbert, Otto Von Guericke, and Robert Boyle started publishing works on electricity.
Closer to the present, Benjamin Franklin, one of the founding fathers of the United States of America conducted extensive research on electricity, often selling his possessions to fund his research.
Though clear distinction doesn’t exist, Sir Francis Ronalds is reputed to be the first electrical engineer. He created the first electronic telegraph and documented how the world would be revolutionized by electricity.
Through his work, engineers in the 19th Century, including Michael Faraday and George Ohm, continued with more research.

The proliferation of Electricity Use

The adage that human revolution is most pronounced in times of strife is true for electrical engineering too.
During the two world wars, electrical engineering saw unprecedented innovation, especially with the advent of the airplane, radio communication, and eavesdropping technology.
Of current, most people cannot fathom living without electricity for powering homes, running industries and also for running communication devices.

The challenges with Current electrical supply

Everyone in the world currently uses electricity. However, there are very many challenges associated with electrical supply. Here are just a few.
Complex and expensive supply networks In the supply of electricity to far-flung townships and villages, governments are often faced with the conundrum of lighting up homes and laying the infrastructure capital expenditure on poor populations or simply leaving these poor folks in the dark.
However, despite all this, the electrical supply network is one of the most expensive engineering undertakings for all humanity.
Increasing Unaffordability of electricity It is an open secret that electricity is expensive in modern times.
In fact, studies show that it is now gobbling up about 10% of all the income of the bottom 20% earners in the US.
Couple this with the fact that about 600 million Africans are still not yet connected to electricity and the problem starts to look more real and urgent.
Electricity loss Electrical loss due to the resistance of the networks used in the supply of electricity runs to around 6-10% of all electricity produced.
Natural Calamities If this infrastructure is destroyed by floods, typhoons, tornados, and landslides among other natural calamities, they often take forever before being repaired, to the detriment of already fragile micro-economies in these areas.
Disruption of electricity can also happen due to surges in demand, especially for prolonged cold seasons and heatwaves.
Environmental Challenges There are many types of electricity, but here, let us light up nuclear and fossil fuel energy. These are the two types of electricity that are the most used in the world.
They are the main course of pollution in the world. Fossil fuel energy is cheap. However, it comes with a heavy price on the carbon emission that we are all trying to fight.
It is therefore not sustainable, and we need to find alternatives sooner rather than later.
It is not easy to excite innovation in the area of renewable energy onto national grids due to the technical difficulties and legislative requirements.
Centralized exploitation Another problem with the centralized supply of utilities like electricity is how they are targeted for opaque billing when corrupt and bloated regimes need to acquire revenue to run their governments.
If electricity can be decentralized, not only will it become cheap in the long run, it will also give poor people their voice and power of choice and self-determination in a very important aspect of their lives.

Why Blockchains have made the situation worse

Proof of Work Blockchains have introduced wasteful consensus algorithms too, and bitcoins block mining was a deliberate attempt to secure the blockchain through proof of work at the expense of environmental considerations.
GPU Mining The blockchain world is re-engineering the blockchain technology in a bid to remove mining centralization, and GPU mining is now being re-enabled, hence increasing the number of computers that will be doing random work and expending even more electricity.

Eloncity’s decentralized energy

So what does Eloncity propose? How can a blockchain related solution solve the problem of electrical supply?
Decentralization of renewable energy Eloncity envisions a way of creating a distributed and blockchain based community driven and localized direct current electricity in a bid to herald a frenetic proliferation of renewable energy technologies.
This will be achieved using the following technologies, working in tandem.
The Energy Distributed Ledger The system will provide a platform where immutable and transparent records of energy transactions will be kept on a blockchain within the community.
The blockchain will also enable the tracking of electricity provenance to enforce non-fossil fuel generation and foster innovation towards renewable energy and a deliberate movement towards de-carbonization.
The Eloncity BESS system One may ask how multiple little contributions of renewable energy can be relied on to give a good smooth flow of electricity. Eloncity proposes to achieve this through the use of an intelligent network of batteries known as the battery energy storage system (BESS).
This network will flatten the intermittent supply and harmonize the local supply vs. demand. It will mitigate the need for expensive mains ancillary services like ac/dc conversion and transmission.
Establishment of a Direct Current grid Direct current is cheaper, simple and straightforward than alternating current.
Most renewable energy is available as direct current.
By proposing to receive it as is, transmit it, store it and avail it as direct current, Eloncity proposes to provide electricity in the simplest and cheapest form to the poorest and most far-flung of the world's populations.

Prerequisites to the success of the Eloncity Energy Model

What is needed for this to happen?
Enabling Regulatory framework An open market policy will be required to ensure that oppressive policies are replaced by an enabling regulatory framework to drive innovation and community based electrical generation and supply.
Community planning and implementation A new renewable energy destiny will be proposed to micro-communities, and the members of these communities will adopt managerial and participatory roles in the sustainability of the Eloncity power initiatives into their cultures and social fabric.
Possibility of Self-Funding Self-funding will get a new meaning in the proposed Eloncity modus operandi.
The blockchain will mobilize revolving loan funds that will be used to install the set-up of the projects, with the community using the energy savings for bills and active renewable energy generation to pay back the loan and help the money to revolve to the next project.

Future State of Electrical management using Eloncity

Eloncity does not propose an overhaul of electricity supply. Rather, it provides a complimentary and cheaper method of bringing the world’s unpowered or energy starved populations to a reliable and cheaper alternative for electricity supply.
The blockchain based project will use Artificial Intelligence and machine learning to regulate the electricity generation and demand dynamics.

The Roadmap for Eloncity

For the last four years, Eloncity’s pioneers, led by Andy Li, the founder, have been working to develop the technologies that will be used and testing the decentralized model for direct current power creation, transmission, storage, and supply.
The technology they propose is now known, even though their whitepaper is not yet out. However, the first micro-grid will be fully commissioned in 2018 Q3, right after the ECT token sale, with increasing development of technologies for full adoption towards the winter of 2022.

Final Thoughts

Is the Eloncity vision grand?
Yes, and it involves the coordination of many interested stakeholders to promote the generation, sale, distribution, usage, and resale of direct current renewable electricity on a micro-community level, using blockchain technology for management of transactions and energy source provenance auditing.
Can they succeed?
The good about Eloncity’s direct current blockchain based electrification model is its dogged insistence on the micro-economic participation as a complete unit of implementation that will eventually tie with the larger integration once adoption of the technology becomes widespread.
Is there greater good?
Hell, Yes!
This technology proposes the promotion and eventual insistence of decarbonized, green and renewable energy and the restriction of the use of fossil fuel or nuclear energy.
If there ever was a good combination of innovation and care for the environment, the Eloncity project is just it.
submitted by hunnykaushal3 to Eloncity [link] [comments]

To HODL or not to HODL

I have been mining small time for a few months now and was a bit nervous about holding my gains. The main reason was something that happened to me and my family last year. I wont go into details, but we were all in the room when the bomb went off at Manchester Arena. After all the hospital stuff and seeing what i did that night you can forgive me for living my life a bit different now. Anyway, i have made a few hundred quid since Christmas when i started mining and i thought the HODL was a good thing, but kept thinking what if something were to happen. My bitcoin is only in a cloud online and i only have the password. I didnt even know if i could actually make a purchase with it. As prices have gone back up a bit i thought what the hell, buy something nice and enjoy it while you can. So i found a place online (Scan Computers) Not the cheapest place to buy from but they are very reliable with postage and have great customer service. All i did was transfer my bitcoin from Nicehash to coinbase wallet and then onto a Bitpay wallet. After that i went to the checkout on Scan computers and copied the link into my Bitpay wallet and that was that. 6 confirmations and 20 minutes later i received an email from Scan saying my delivery was due tomorrow . It is a 500g Samsung evo nvme stick. So if you are a noob to mining like me, it does work and you can enjoy the hard work your GPU's have put in. Now i know it works i will let the GPU's carry on untill i have enough to buy a brand new 11 series GPU when they arrive. If anyone else knows of any other useful stores in the UK that take Bitcoin and are succesful buying from them, please let us know as its good for us and good for bitcoin. All the best..
submitted by nicehash1 to NiceHash [link] [comments]

Why The ‘Wretched of the World’ Need the Eloncity Blockchain for Energy

We know about how blockchain technology is revolutionizing the peer to peer transfer of value, creating immutable and transparent records and changing many aspects of our lives in ways that are simply revolutionary.
But there is no human for that matter, that doesn’t use electricity.
In fact, most blockchains survive on the misuse of electricity. And most of this electricity is generated from fossil fuels, a phenomenon that speeds up the degradation of our environment.
Can Blockchain be used to provide affordable renewable electricity for all?
Well, Eloncity proposes to do just that!
Let us find out how

The History of Electrical Engineering

From the time Thales of Miletus, an ancient Greek Philosopher discovered static electricity at around 600 BC, electrical engineering has undergone many revolutions to become one of the most comprehensive engineering feats accomplished by humanity.
However, electrical possibilities remained an intellectual curiosity for millennia, until the 17th century when scientists like William Gilbert, Otto Von Guericke, and Robert Boyle started publishing works on electricity.
Closer to the present, Benjamin Franklin, one of the founding fathers of the United States of America conducted extensive research on electricity, often selling his possessions to fund his research.
Though clear distinction doesn’t exist, Sir Francis Ronalds is reputed to be the first electrical engineer. He created the first electronic telegraph and documented how the world would be revolutionized by electricity.
Through his work, engineers in the 19th Century, including Michael Faraday and George Ohm, continued with more research.

The proliferation of Electricity Use

The adage that human revolution is most pronounced in times of strife is true for electrical engineering too.
During the two world wars, electrical engineering saw unprecedented innovation, especially with the advent of the airplane, radio communication, and eavesdropping technology.
Of current, most people cannot fathom living without electricity for powering homes, running industries and also for running communication devices.

The challenges with Current electrical supply

Everyone in the world currently uses electricity. However, there are very many challenges associated with electrical supply. Here are just a few.
Complex and expensive supply networks In the supply of electricity to far-flung townships and villages, governments are often faced with the conundrum of lighting up homes and laying the infrastructure capital expenditure on poor populations or simply leaving these poor folks in the dark.
However, despite all this, the electrical supply network is one of the most expensive engineering undertakings for all humanity.
Increasing Unaffordability of electricity It is an open secret that electricity is expensive in modern times.
In fact, studies show that it is now gobbling up about 10% of all the income of the bottom 20% earners in the US.
Couple this with the fact that about 600 million Africans are still not yet connected to electricity and the problem starts to look more real and urgent.
Electricity loss Electrical loss due to the resistance of the networks used in the supply of electricity runs to around 6-10% of all electricity produced.
Natural Calamities If this infrastructure is destroyed by floods, typhoons, tornados, and landslides among other natural calamities, they often take forever before being repaired, to the detriment of already fragile micro-economies in these areas.
Disruption of electricity can also happen due to surges in demand, especially for prolonged cold seasons and heatwaves.
Environmental Challenges There are many types of electricity, but here, let us light up nuclear and fossil fuel energy. These are the two types of electricity that are the most used in the world.
They are the main course of pollution in the world. Fossil fuel energy is cheap. However, it comes with a heavy price on the carbon emission that we are all trying to fight.
It is therefore not sustainable, and we need to find alternatives sooner rather than later.
It is not easy to excite innovation in the area of renewable energy onto national grids due to the technical difficulties and legislative requirements.
Centralized exploitation Another problem with the centralized supply of utilities like electricity is how they are targeted for opaque billing when corrupt and bloated regimes need to acquire revenue to run their governments.
If electricity can be decentralized, not only will it become cheap in the long run, it will also give poor people their voice and power of choice and self-determination in a very important aspect of their lives.

Why Blockchains have made the situation worse

Proof of Work Blockchains have introduced wasteful consensus algorithms too, and bitcoins block mining was a deliberate attempt to secure the blockchain through proof of work at the expense of environmental considerations.
GPU Mining The blockchain world is re-engineering the blockchain technology in a bid to remove mining centralization, and GPU mining is now being re-enabled, hence increasing the number of computers that will be doing random work and expending even more electricity.

Eloncity’s decentralized energy

So what does Eloncity propose? How can a blockchain related solution solve the problem of electrical supply?
Decentralization of renewable energy Eloncity envisions a way of creating a distributed and blockchain based community driven and localized direct current electricity in a bid to herald a frenetic proliferation of renewable energy technologies.
This will be achieved using the following technologies, working in tandem.
The Energy Distributed Ledger The system will provide a platform where immutable and transparent records of energy transactions will be kept on a blockchain within the community.
The blockchain will also enable the tracking of electricity provenance to enforce non-fossil fuel generation and foster innovation towards renewable energy and a deliberate movement towards de-carbonization.
The Eloncity BESS system One may ask how multiple little contributions of renewable energy can be relied on to give a good smooth flow of electricity. Eloncity proposes to achieve this through the use of an intelligent network of batteries known as the battery energy storage system (BESS).
This network will flatten the intermittent supply and harmonize the local supply vs. demand. It will mitigate the need for expensive mains ancillary services like ac/dc conversion and transmission.
Establishment of a Direct Current grid Direct current is cheaper, simple and straightforward than alternating current.
Most renewable energy is available as direct current.
By proposing to receive it as is, transmit it, store it and avail it as direct current, Eloncity proposes to provide electricity in the simplest and cheapest form to the poorest and most far-flung of the world's populations.

Prerequisites to the success of the Eloncity Energy Model

What is needed for this to happen?
Enabling Regulatory framework An open market policy will be required to ensure that oppressive policies are replaced by an enabling regulatory framework to drive innovation and community based electrical generation and supply.
Community planning and implementation A new renewable energy destiny will be proposed to micro-communities, and the members of these communities will adopt managerial and participatory roles in the sustainability of the Eloncity power initiatives into their cultures and social fabric.
Possibility of Self-Funding Self-funding will get a new meaning in the proposed Eloncity modus operandi.
The blockchain will mobilize revolving loan funds that will be used to install the set-up of the projects, with the community using the energy savings for bills and active renewable energy generation to pay back the loan and help the money to revolve to the next project.

Future State of Electrical management using Eloncity

Eloncity does not propose an overhaul of electricity supply. Rather, it provides a complimentary and cheaper method of bringing the world’s unpowered or energy starved populations to a reliable and cheaper alternative for electricity supply.
The blockchain based project will use Artificial Intelligence and machine learning to regulate the electricity generation and demand dynamics.

Final Thoughts

Is the Eloncity vision grand?
Yes, and it involves the coordination of many interested stakeholders to promote the generation, sale, distribution, usage, and resale of direct current renewable electricity on a micro-community level, using blockchain technology for management of transactions and energy source provenance auditing.
Can they succeed?
The good about Eloncity’s direct current blockchain based electrification model is its dogged insistence on the micro-economic participation as a complete unit of implementation that will eventually tie with the larger integration once adoption of the technology becomes widespread.
Is there greater good?
Hell, Yes!
This technology proposes the promotion and eventual insistence of decarbonized, green and renewable energy and the restriction of the use of fossil fuel or nuclear energy.
If there ever was a good combination of innovation and care for the environment, the Eloncity project is just it.
submitted by hunnykaushal3 to Eloncity [link] [comments]

My Experience: From FX-8350 to R7-1700

Upgrading from an FX-8350 to a R7-1700.
Just a bit about me – I have been building computers since the mid 80’s. I missed the 8-inch floppy disk era, but came on board when dual 5.25” was considered mainstream and a 10-megabyte full-height HDD was the mark of a power user. The first computer I built for my own enjoyment was an AMD X5-133 (a factory overclocked 486 faster than the Pentium-75), and I’ve used a wide variety of systems since then, including a Pentium Pro-200 which served me well in college and a K6-2 which I took to quite a few LAN parties. While I’ve always had Intel notebooks, my PC’s have been AMD for quite some time now. I decided to upgrade my current main machine, which is an FX-8350 with a mild 4.4Ghz overclock. I was using 2x8GB Crucial Ballistix DDR3-1600 and a Sapphire Radeon Fury Nitro. While I know the R5-1600x would be a better bet for a pure gaming build, I have a soft spot for 8-core machines. I had been tempted to pull the trigger on an i7-7700k for a while, but the timing never worked out. But when I found the R7-1700 at a deep discount and an X370 motherboard on the shelf next to it – I couldn’t resist the siren call of a new build.
Here are my thoughts about the process:
AM4 is physically the same as AM3 from a build perspective, except for the mounting holes. I don’t know what was so important about making the holes have different offsets, but this makes it much more difficult to get quality cooling. Not all manufacturers have brackets yet, and I’m still waiting on Cooler Master to release the brackets for my Siedon 240.
The new motherboard feels very different from my AM3 board. My FX-8350 sat on an ASUS M5A99FX Pro R2.0. It was, for lack of a better word, a very workstation-ish board. 4 PCIx16 slots, 10x USB ports (2 of the USB 3.0), triple USB 2.0 front panel headers (and a USB 3.0 front panel header as well), eSATA on the rear panel, beefy VRM and Northbridge cooling, Toslink output for audio, and so on. The board itself is full of tiny components, support chips, and ports. Granted, many of these connectors are outdated (eSATA and USB2.0), and the PCIe is only 2.0 instead of current-gen 3.0, but there is a LOT of connectivity. Few people paired an FX chip with triple of quad-GPU for gaming, but I know a fair number of people used these for bitcoin mining back before there was widespread ASIC support and back then GPU mining was the most cost-effective way to mint cryptocurrency. Extra PCIe slots could be used for dedicated video capture, PCI-based storage, a RAID card, etc... Having 4 full-size slots allows this kind of flexibility. The new motherboard is an Asrock Fatal1ty x370 Gaming K4. It does not feel very workstation-ish at all. It has only two 16x PCIe slots (and when they are both in use they are only 8x), 8 USB ports on the rear panel, and a much less “busy” motherboard. Very few support chips litter its surface. Instead of a workstation component, it feels much more like a luxury consumer product. This is not a bad thing – just something I noticed while building the system. The rear IO shield is red and black to match its gaming aesthetic, it includes things like premium audio (including a very nice headphone amplifier for the front panel connectors), and while it only has 8x USB ports on the back, 6 of them are USB 3.0 and two of them (including a type-C connector) are USB 3.1 gen2. It includes RGB LED’s under the chipset heatsink and three separate RGB LED controller ports (one of which is used for the boxed cooler), Intel gigabit Ethernet, and dual M.2 slots (one of which connected directly to the CPU). It is very different in “feel” from the older ASUS board, even down to things like a shroud for the external connectors and metal-reinforced PCI slots. I must say, its more aggressive appearance and near-empty areas appeal to me. It does, however, funnel the builder into a particular configuration: limited fast storage through the M.2 slots, slow(er) storage through the 6x SATA ports, all external devices should be USB 3. Personally, these limitations didn’t restrict me for this build, since that was how I was going to set it up anyway, but the fewer connectivity choices might cause some pause for others. The only thing I don’t like about this board is the 20 second POST times. 20 seconds every time. Resuming from sleep is very fast, just reboots are slow. That’s really it. I have no substantive complaints other than that – well, and the memory speed limitations – more on that below.
The Wraith Spire cooler is without doubt the best looking box cooler I’ve ever seen. The symmetrical cylinder look, combined with the LED logo and RGB ring are very striking. I can see why many people have asked to order one, though I think for the 1700X and 1800X they are better off without it. I’ll explain why further down.
Initial hardware setup was very easy. I was able to flash to the newest 2.0 BIOS without any hassle using a DOS USB flash boot drive. The 2.0 BIOS has the newest AGESA code from AMD, as well as support for the R5 processors and better DDR4 compatibility. I didn’t want to cheap out on RAM since apparently Ryzen is sensitive to DDR4 speeds for the latency between cores. I bought the cheapest 16GB DDR4-3200 kit I could find (the EVGA SuperSC 2x8GB), for which I paid $115. While I was not able to get it to boot at 3200, I could get 2933 simply by activating XMP, then manually changing the speed from 3200 to 3000. I then tested it with MemTest86 for two complete cycles, which it passed without errors. I have encountered zero memory issues with these RAM sticks running at 2933. Since this motherboard does not officially support DDR4-3200 at all, I figure this is a good outcome. I am curious to know whether anyone has gotten 3200 on this board – that is, whether the lack of 3200 memory on Asrock’s QVL is a marketing issue or an actual hardware limitation – but I didn’t want to spend nearly double that amount in order to get AM4 verified memory (G.Skill’s FlareX), and 2966 seemed fast enough from the benchmark results I had read.
My old setup had a Samsung 850 EVO 256gb SATA6 drive as the primary boot/gaming drive. It seemed plenty fast but it had become too small for my needs, so this seemed like a good opportunity to buy a new SSD. I originally thought the NVMe drives would be out of my price range, but I bought the Intel 600p 512GB drive for only $10 more than I would have paid for a premium SATA6 drive. Though the 600p is without doubt the SLOWEST NVMe drive out there, it has 3x the read speed as the SATA6 drives, and most of what I am doing with it is trying to get quicker load times. If I was using it for professional workloads (as a video editing scratch drive, for example), I would need much higher sustained write speeds and then Samsung would be the obvious answer. I just didn’t want to spend an extra $80 on write performance that I’d never notice, and the 600p has been an excellent boot/gaming drive.
Ok, back to the Wraith Spire. I tend to have bad luck with the silicon lottery. My FX-8350 was not able to be stable above 4.4Ghz with reasonable temperatures. I was hoping I would be able to get better results from the R7-1700, since general reports indicated that it overclocked well. Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell how good of an overclock I am getting since I can find no good information about maximum recommended temperatures for this chip. Some people say 75c is the maximum safe temp. Others say 75c is a fine everyday 24/7 temp. Others say they are running it at 80c all the time without any issues at all. Steve at Techspot was getting 88c and 90c when overclocking the 1600X and 1500X using the stock coolers and without any instability – were those dangerous temps or totally fine? Nobody seems to know. I like my overclocks to be set-and-forget. I want to get it dialed in and then leave it for years without worrying that it will burn up or degrade or that in this or that application I have to turn back to stock speeds because of the thermals. Since I don’t know what max safe thermals are, I just have to guess based on stock thermals.
For stock speeds, the Wraith Spire does a good job. It is very quiet, and after a few BIOS fan-curve tweaks, it keeps the chip around 35-38 at idle, and around 68-70 on Prime95 (Small FFT, for maximum temperature generation). Incidentally, it also hits 70 if I run Cinebench a bunch of times in a row as well, so I don’t consider the Small FFT test to be totally unrealistic for the load this chip might encounter. From what I can tell, these are good normal temps. I can get 3.5Ghz by simply changing the multiplier and leaving the voltage at stock. This gives Cinebench numbers around the 1550 mark (roughly 6900k levels). Prime95 shows a modest boost in temperatures of 3-4 degrees C, and was stable even for several hours. If I push it to 3.6Ghz at stock voltage the system is unstable. At 3.7Ghz (the 1700’s boost speed for single-threaded loads) it is stable only if I give it 1.3v. While that is a totally fine voltage (AMD recommends up to 1.35v for 24/7), the Wraith Spire cannot handle a Prime95 Small FFT load anymore. I shut down the test and reverted the OC when the CPU read 89c. Given the fact that the Spire was meant to cool a 65w chip (and so probably is rated at no more than 85-95w), this is not a terribly surprising temperature – I wish I knew if it was dangerous. I have no doubt that a 240mm radiator or even a decent tower cooler will be more than enough to cool down my 3.7Ghz R7-1700. I am a little jealous of the people who just set the multiplier to 3700 and are good to go – lower voltages probably mean the Spire would be enough. But for me, it was not to be. I was halfway tempted to see at what temperature the chip would reduce its clock speed, but I didn’t want to burn up a chip I had just bought – might as well wait until I get bigger and better cooling to OC it to the 3.8-3.9 I hope it will reach.
Other than the OC temps it has been smooth sailing. Gaming feels more fluid than with the FX, even in games that I always thought were GPU-limited and/or running at 60fps with VSYNC on. Especially games that are sensitive to single-core performance (Heroes of the Storm is my latest addiction) there is a definite boost in 1% low and 0.1% low FPS. I have been using the Ryzen Balanced power plan from AMD and it seems to do a fantastic job keeping temps low when idle and letting the cores ramp up really fast when needed. I need to test whether the lack of core parking prevents it from hitting the 3.7Ghz boost as much as the regular Balanced plan allows. I think a simple CineBench single-thread comparison will do the trick.
I also tried streaming a bit – and it was able to generate 1080p60fps at x264-medium settings without being noticeable while in game. Later I edited some video of my kids – the final render speed was SOOOO fast. I am, on the whole, very happy with my upgrade. I get better single-core performance, much much better multi-core performance, along with faster disk speeds, and a more modern platform (with RGB lighting, M.2, USB 3.1, etc…).
Now if only I could find out appropriate temperatures…..
submitted by Morphon to Amd [link] [comments]

You guys are destroying my guys

I hail from buildapc where RAM, SSD, and GPU Prices have skyrocketed because of your mining. So please stop, I just want to build a pc for a decent price, it's $200 for the cheapest 16GB RAM, and $420 for the cheapest GTX 1070. Cryptocurrency is draining the real world dry (especially bitcoin). Edit: I love desktops, and don't "hate" bitcoin. I just think that you guys are draining pc parts from this world.
submitted by Megablast66 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

[Discussion] My own personal guide to used hardware alternatives.

Hi there. My name is Jeff. I've been building systems for the better part of 15 years and try my best to contribute here actively. After being involved in this little community for a few years now, I'm noticing a serious lack of discussion about buying used components, and I feel like it's time to shed a little light on the subject for those looking to build on a (seriously) tight budget.
As Linus said in his scrapyard wars video, buying new on $300 isn't practical, and if you posed the challenge to him on a random day, buying used is almost certainly the path he'd choose. As someone who's been "scrapyarding" as a hobby for the better part of 10 years, I figured I'd take some time to share some of what I've learned for the modern audience.
Let's begin with a simple rundown of modern "budget" choices, and I'll tell you what I'd do instead.
CPU
The G3258 and Athlon 860k are the sub-$100 CPUs of choice, and both work just fine. I have built with both in the past, and each carries their own set of advantages.
Used Alternatives: You can go in a couple of directions here; if you happen to have an LGA 1366 motherboard lying around, you can get an i7 920 or better for under $50, and they still hold up reasonably well. Being that LGA 1366 boards are not typically cheap when purchased used, my favourite option is the Phenom II x4 Black Edition series, each of which compare favourably to modern budget options, and will even overclock on some incredibly dated, dirt cheap AM2+ boards. In my experience, eBay prices on these get a little too high for my taste, but I've been able to nab several on Kijiji locally in Toronto for under $50 as well.
GPU
The R7 260x and GTX 750 ti are often cited as budget options for most builders, with the latter serving a very specific role in systems where power draw might be a concern. While there exists no option that can complete with the low consumption of the 750 ti (or even the single 6-pin connector goodness of the 260x), its performance can easily be matched (and exceeded) for less money.
Used Alternatives: The bitcoin mining craze from a few years back led to the Radeon 7950 and 7970 being blacklisted on the used market, and I think the fears about burned-out cards are a little overblown. Here in Toronto, you can easily grab a 7950 for the price of a 260x, but I don't pay anywhere near that for my builds. At most, a Windforce will cost me $125, as where I recently picked up some non-boost edition PowerColor versions for a mere $83 each (bought 3 for $250).
EDIT: Forgot to mention something important - avoid the reference 7950 and 7970. They were employed to a far greater degree in mining rigs because of their rear-only exhaust, and if you see a bunch of them from the same seller listed at once, they're likely old mining cards. Only pick them up if they're incredibly cheap.
Want to go even cheaper? The Radeon 6950 (with the shader unlock, preferably) or even the 6970 will rival the performance of the 260x, and shouldn't cost Canadians more than $50-$60. I personally have 2 in my possession right now, and have gone through at least a dozen in the last 6 months.
In general, one should always avoid Nvidia when buying used, because they are far too popular and overvalued for their performance as they age. I still see GTX 660s selling for $150, which is absolutely absurd.
Motherboards
Motherboards on the used market are weird, and this can largely be attributed to the fact that they're hard to transport and don't handle well over time. As such, people don't really sell boards on their own that often, and you'll likely have more luck finding a combo of some kind (or even a ready-to-go tin-can with no graphics card) for less per part than you will finding a given board on its own.
Used Alternatives: The boards I'd recommend depend entirely on the CPU you've chosen. Being that I'm a fan of the Phenom II x4 series, AM2+ boards are going to be dirt cheap, but DDR2 RAM is actually fucking expensive, so you'd likely be better off going with AM3. I've even seen some used AM3+ boards (The 970 ASRock Extreme3, in particular) for as low as $40, so it wouldn't hurt to look.
On the Intel side, you're actually at a significant disadvantage. Much like Nvidia cards, Intel boards (and CPUs) actually retain their value and don't often come cheap. For me, LGA 1156 is the price/performance sweet spot, granted I can find an i7 8XX to go with it. Even still, they're going to run you a fair bit more than an AMD board, and likely aren't worth it by comparison.
RAM
Ram is ram. DDR2 is pricy as fuck due to an obvious market shortage of the stuff, so the AM2+ board option might not be best by comparison. DDR3 ram, however, is ubiquitous, and I always die a little inside when people building on a "budget" choose to buy new at all. If I'm being honest, I can get DDR3 ram from e-waste recycling companies for as low as $10 per 4GB stick, at 1333MHz, and not once have I ever had a bad stick of the stuff. Even for people going the route of the G3258 (which only supports 1333MHz), this is the clear winner.
Is value RAM ugly as sin? Sure it is. It is just as good as that fancy Ripjaws shit you've got in your current build? You betcha.
Storage
Hard Drives are actually a tricky game, as they are the single most volatile component in any budget build, easily succumbing to wear and tear from age and daily use. As such (and some might find this hard to believe) I actively avoid HDDs when building value systems for people and opt for cheap SSDs instead. As always, check the date on a drive if you're really insistent on buying one, and considering how cheap a WD blue is new, don't pull the trigger on one unless it's for less than $30/TB.
SSDs are obviously (akin to RAM) highly resilient and are nearly guaranteed to work when purchased used. The average SSD pulled from an old laptop or an office off-lease desktop, will have no more than 100GB of writes on it, which leaves 99% of its life for you to exploit. While there exists no specific recommendation for which brand to buy, just be sure you're getting a relatively good drive with SATA III capability. 120/128GB variants of these sorts should cost you no more than $50 in my native Canada, and I've even gotten lucky on some larger sizes too. Recently I picked up 4 256GB Samsung 840 Pros for $75 each (I came), just days after I bought a Crucial MX100 of the same size for $85.
Monitors
Monitors are fun to buy, because the recent shifts in display technology have rendered a lot of recent-but-obsolete models nearly valueless. For example, remember when 16:10 was a thing? I actually still like 1680x1050 monitors, but the rest of the world seems to disagree, so I've been able to pick up 23" variants for as little as $40. Being that the slightly lower resolution actually eases the strain on your VRAM a bit, it's a nice fit for a lot of budget cards that might not have a full 2GB available, like some variants of the 6950. 1600x900 monitors are often just as cheap and come with the same inherent benefit of being obsolete despite being almost as good as its bigger 1080p cousin.
Keyboards and Mice
If you're on a budget, we can't even have this discussion. As much as I like mechanical keyboards and high-precision gaming mice, people building used $300 systems aren't going to allot any of their budget buying them. That said, wired USB keyboards and mice are virtually free (search your local goodwill or value village for some), and if you have to pay money, buy a wireless combo for $20 new from some little shit store in a suburb somewhere.
Cases
Cases on their own sell for about half of their original retail price, give or take based on the condition. I normally just get them as a part of a tin-can bundle and make use of them if they aren't too dirty, but when building for someone else, I'd often just prefer to buy a new budget case in the $40 range.
PSUs
I saved this topic for last, because it's by far the most difficult category to master. First off, you really need to do your research and understand how PSUs work before delving into these guys, as the cost associated is almost entirely dependent on how resilient the underlying platform has been proven to be. Generally speaking, reading reviews on JonnyGuru and HardOCP is a great start, but none of them account for units that are several years old.
As a general rule of thumb, I use the EVGA 500W W1 as a reference point, and build my value tree around that. In other words, if a new EVGA 500W (a passable, proven budget unit) is cheaper than a used 500W variant of a better brand, why would I bother buying used? Sure, that 520W Seasonic S12II puts the EVGA to shame in terms of voltage regulation and ripple suppression, but can I really make the same claims of a unit that's 5 years into its life? Wouldn't I just be safer buying new? These are all factors you have to consider.
For me, the threshold lies around 50% in terms of cost savings vs. risk. In other words, if you can find a used quality unit for less than half the price of the cheapest quality unit available at a given time, buy it.
Anyhow I think that covers everything. And as a closing note, remember to be safe. Meet potential sellers (and buyers) in public, well-lit places, and try your best to avoid entering someone's home without some protections in place. Also, the more info you get about the person (address, phone number, etc) the less likely it is that a person will be trying to scam you. People who purposely conceal their identity do so for a reason.
Also, feel free to ask me anything about my own experiences buying and selling used. I've been doing it as a hobby for a long, long time and have sold many value builds to people who can't otherwise afford PCs. I'm happy to impart any wisdom I might've gained over the years.
Edit: CPU Coolers! Forgot those. Air coolers are a safe bet. They're slabs of copper and aluminum with fans strapped to them. Buy with confidence, and seek one out for $10-$15 if you plan to overclock. AIO water cooling is not so safe. Those things are typically only good for 2-3 years, and you have no idea how much longer a pump has before it gives. Budget builders likely aren't water-cooling anyhow, right?
Edit 2: Just to be clear, when I said I'd been doing this for a long time, I should clarify that a) I once owned a game store and sold systems out of there and b) I currently resell systems out of my house to raise money for charity builds. I really don't want people to get the impression I'm trying to sell anything.
submitted by Oafah to buildapc [link] [comments]

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Super Cheap Bitcoin Mining PC Build - Part 1 - YouTube

Vosk reviews how to build the best cheap beginner crypto GPU mining rig in a few easy steps! Anyone can build this Duo Mining Rig for less than $1000 with no... A detailed video of the mining performance and efficiency of two popular budget graphics cards. I test the RX560 Versus the GTX 1050Ti when mining Ethereum, ... #bitcoin #bitcoinmining #bitcoinminingsoftware By Far The BEST Bitcoin Mining Software In 2020 (Profitable). This is a review on the most profitable, easy, a... In this video I go over CPU mining and I give examples of this by showing a old HP z800 Xeon computer that I was given for FREE. Actually I was given two of ... Buy Raspberry Pi 4 Model B 4GB: https://amzn.to/2tlBfGW How to Setup a Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining Rig w/ Bitmain AntMiner U3: https://youtu.be/dPWTSytzN7g...

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