Best Mining Rigs - Miners For Sale

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by coldfeet45 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by armabotwe to nem [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillylamb44 to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillycheetah59 to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillylamb44 to MiningPoolHub [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillylamb44 to BytecoinBCN [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillycheetah59 to cryptomining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillylamb44 to CryptoMiningTalk [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillycheetah59 to nexusearth [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by tdd4513 to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by armabotwe to ico [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by armabotwe to ethdev [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillycheetah59 to XeraExchange [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining: popular software for managing the processes

The Bitcoin exchange rate faced a significant drop not a long time ago, so a lot of miners think that mining this coin is not as profitable as before. However, Bitcoin is stabilizing, so now is the time to start mining it again. And, definitely, it is better to do this with reliable and efficient software.
There are a lot of operating systems for managing Bitcoin mining, so making a final choice can be a rather complicated task. This guide is here to help you — it describes features, advantages and disadvantages of the most popular software.

Hive OS: an all-in-one solution

Hive OS is a highly secure and stable mining platform based on the Linux distribution of Ubuntu. Besides, you will have no difficulties with its installation, setup and use. However, if you have any questions, you can always get in touch with the support team. The support is provided 24/7, so you will get help very quickly. There is also an extensive knowledge base that you can use.
Hive OS significantly simplifies even large farms’ management. A lot of things can be automated. For instance, automatic control of the fans, execution of commands according to the schedule, etc. Apart from this, switching between pools, wallets or coins takes only a second. The list of miners is updated regularly, just like the list of features — the Hive OS team is constantly working on the system considering the needs of the community. With Hive OS it is also possible to control the workers remotely.
Hive OS allows mining Bitcoin on ASICs and GPU rigs, offers its own pool and custom firmware for ASICs. It is an all-in-one solution that you can use in order to make the management process simpler and increase your profits.

СGMiner: suitable for experienced owners of AMD cards

CGMiner is an open-source miner focused specifically on mining Bitcoin (although some other coins can also be mined here). It supports GPU, ASIC and CPU mining, and is available for the following platforms: Windows, Linux and OS X. While using all the traditional features (for instance, overclocking) you won’t have to pay a dev fee.
However, this miner is not that suitable for inexperienced users — you at least need to have some knowledge of GitHub. Another thing to keep in mind is that CGMiner doesn’t work well with Nvidia cards.

Cudo Miner: a nice option for beginners

Cudo Miner is a simple to use crypto mining platform. Remote management, monitoring and overclocking — these and other standard features are available. Cudo Miner also offers automated mining and auto coin switching. Besides, if necessary, you can create custom templates in order to increase performance of your devices.
On the other side, Cudo Miner doesn’t support ASICs. One more unpleasant thing is that the fees are based on the amount of cryptocurrency mined in the last 30 days, and they are pretty high. For example, for less than 0.005 BTC, the fee is 6.5%.

SimpleMining: the choice of GPU owners

SimpleMining is a mining OS platform supporting all modern Nvidia and AMD GPUs. Using it, you can take bulk actions on multiple devices. Standard features like overclocking and undervolting are available as well. Besides, there are a lot of miner programmes to choose from, but you can still add a custom miner if necessary. But please keep in mind that it is impossible to mix AMD and Nvidia in one rig.

Hashr8: for users who know everything about mining

Hashr8 is an operating system suitable both for ASICs and GPU rigs. The system also supports many pools and miners. You can monitor devices not only in the web interface, but also via the mobile application. Support is provided around the clock. Besides, Hashr8 can be used for free — this option is available to miners using up to 3 devices inclusive. At the same time, there are no other restrictions — free users can use all the functions of the system.
However, despite the above-mentioned benefits, Hashr8 also has some disadvantages. Firstly, you can contact the support team only using the form on the website or by email, so there is no chance for getting help instantly. The website also has no FAQ, so if you run into a problem, you are likely to have to solve it yourself. Secondly, Hashr8 is a rather unstable system, which can affect your income.

Awesome Miner: suitable for centralized mining management

Awesome Miner allows managing and monitoring the mining operations, and supports ASICs and GPU rigs (CPU mining is possible too). Using it, you can perform operations both on individual miners and the groups, and build templates for easier configuration. Note that Awesome Miner can be used for free, but on certain conditions: you can have up to 2 miners, while the list of available features is rather limited.
Awesome Miner runs only on Windows, but you can still connect it to mining software running on Linux. Apart from this, it can be difficult for a new user to understand how this solution works, as its interface is not that convenient and intuitive.

What Software to Choose?

Obviously, the final decision completely depends on your needs, but we recommend choosing a universal system that supports GPU rigs and ASICs. By doing this, you will have freedom of action. A similar recommendation can be applied to GPU rigs — if you prefer them, choose a system that works both with Nvidia and AMD cards.
Make your choice wisely, and have profitable Bitcoin mining!
submitted by sillycheetah59 to komodoplatform [link] [comments]

My own (x-post) If you like virtually building PCs, will you help me with mine again?

Tl;Dr: I have an i3, 8 gb of ram, and a GTX 960--help me build a new pc so i can appropriately game again?
A few years back, I got some help building my current rig--but I went TOO budget and need to upgrade.
That build (which I am currently posting from) is here: https://pcpartpicker.com/useG1ng3rBr3dd/saved/#view=bGybt6
Specs:
- Intel i3-6100 CPU
- GeForce GTX 960 GPU
- G-Skill Single Slot 8gb RAM
- Corsair CX 500 PSU
- Asus VX238H-W 23.0" 1920x1080 Monitor (I think I need a higher fps monitor from what I've been told)
- Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mini Tower Case
- Gigabyte GA-H110M-A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard
Gaming has been increasingly difficult and I want to actually enjoy gaming again without falling victim to being the lowest frame rate/highest latency on every server I enter.
I gamed on my buddy's pc the other day and I was floored. I'm unsure what his specs are, but it made me realize that mine is just holding me back.
I don't need a ProGaming+Streaming+Bitcoin Farming BEAST of a PC. I just want to enjoy gaming again and be able to for a few years with minimal upgrades.
I really like PCpartpicker.com as I'm ignorant and it's highly user-friendly so if you are bored and like doing this stuff, I'd really appreciate the help picking the best parts for what I'm looking for at a price I can justify to myself.
My top-tier budget is around $1200 but that may be insanely high or insanely low for what I'm asking; I'm not really sure. If I can keep and use some of the parts I already have (Tower case, motherboard [maybe], PSU[?]) That'd be awesome but I understand If I can't.
Thank you for reading and thank you in advance if you decide to venture into this for me. I appreciate y'all.
submitted by G1ng3rBr3dd to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

Why is the RandomX algorithm being hyped to the moon?

TL;DR: don't assume the average return from mining RandomX will be higher than the current CryptonightR algorithm. Hold back your excitement for now.
I think we all need to bring something to our attention. Over the last month, there have been so many topics and comments here on MoneroMining about the new 'RandomX' algorithm. This algorithm is supposed to be launched a couple of months from now.
There are many questions like "is this a good hashrate for my CPU"? "What's your power usage on RandomX"? "How can I tune my CPU for RandomX"? "How would the algorithm perform on this hardware"? I think these are great constructive comments that are at the heart of what miners stand for. We miners love optimizing our rigs and educating ourselves on technological trends.
But I've noticed many questions such as "what parts should I buy for a RandomX mining rig"? "Is an AMD Ryzen 9 3900x a good investment"? "What parts will give me the most profit when RandomX launches"? Many of these questions are asked with very little research.
I think there's a gold fever brewing behind some of these comments. The kind of motives that have bankrupted many miners in the past bubbles.
As we have seen in 2014 and 2018, anybody who enters the crypto industry with an 'I want easy profit' attitude almost always goes bankrupt. They buy coins or hardware at the peak of the bubble. Sometimes they get lucky and sell their coins or rigs right before the crash (only to get burned in a future bubble later). But most of the time, these new users lose most of their investment.
As a veteran miner, a lot of alarm bells ring in my head when I read these kinds of RandomX hype posts.
I have no reason to think CPU mining will be more profitable on RandomX than on the current CryptonightR.
In the GPU mining community, I have the feeling that there's a lot of resentment over the 2018 crypto recession and the whole 'ASIC miner invasion'. I think people here are feeling burned over their losses last year and the evil ASIC takeover, and want an opportunity for the little guy to start mining again. So we're falsely seeing the RandomX ray of hope as a floodlight, and getting overexcited.
And in general, the ordinary person cannot make a significant, steady profit in the crypto mining industry. The guy who wrote that thread is very rich and even 100 GTX 1080 Ti's cost nothing to him. The reason he became wealthy is because he avoided get-rich-quick gimmicks back in the day (like the dotcom sites) and focused on learning technology for the future. Mining will not make you rich, and especially not RandomX coin tossing.
If you love RandomX, build your rig now, keep benchmarking and undervolting and have fun at it. But if you just want profit, wait until RandomX is up and running. And consider all the risks involved with a new algorithm and commercial mining in general.
So I hope we can all reconsider whether we're excited about RandomX for the right reasons. Let's try to avoid jumping to conclusions about profitability and hold off on the Newegg 'checkout' button. Even though 12 cores at 70 watts sounds awesome. Happy mining!
submitted by Hammereditor to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

EDIT: Per the moderation staff, I'm adding in to the header what I'm using to make it easier for prospective miners.
  1. Go to https://www.nicehash.com/
  2. Create a login
  3. Download their software and run it (this used to be "????")
  4. Profit
Once you reach 0.002 BTC (about 7-10 days on my GTX 1060 + i7-7700k), you can transfer your earnings to Coinbase for free, and cash out. CB does have fees for conversion to Fiat (cash) and your percentage goes down with higher amounts. So don't cash out just because you can. Cash out when you have enough to buy something.
Also a note on taxes. I'm going to keep this simple.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading. Bear with me as I go over this a few more times for typing/grammar. And I look forward to your comments.
submitted by jaykresge to hardware [link] [comments]

I literally have tens of thousands of dollars in top-shelf hardware, looking to repurpose some before selling on eBay to build a NAS system, possibly a dedicated firewall device as well. o_O

Q1) What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.**

A1) This will be a dedicated NAS system for my home network. As such, I'm looking to have it:

- Host ##TB's of 720, 1080 & up resolution Movies and TV Shows I'm about to begin ripping from a MASSIVE DVD & Blueray collection I have.

- My kids are big on Minecraft. I understand it's possible to host your own "worlds" (or whatever they call the maps you can build) on your own "server". I think it would be pretty neat to offer them (& their friends - if can be done 'safely/securely') their own partition on one of my NAS HDD's.

- I also have accounts with a couple diff VPN companies... I understand it's possible (?) to sync said VPN's with a NAS, this might be a more relative topic on the next point/purpose...

- I'd like to be able to remotely link to this NAS for when I travel overseas and want to stream at my temp location from my house/this NAS.
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Q2) What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?**

* A2) Here's where I make matters more complicated than most others would... I've been an advocate for Bitcoin and crypto-currencies in general since 2013. I invested in a small mining outfit back in 2014 (strictly Bitcoin/ASIC's). One of my buddies is the President of a large-scale mining operation (foreign and domestic) and he convinced me to dabble in the GPU mining-space. I made my first hardware purchase in Q4, 2017 and launched a small-scale GPU-Farm in my house since then. I had the rigs mining up until Q3 of 2018 (not cost-efficient to keep on, especially living in SoFlo) and since then, the hardware's been collecting dust (& pissing off my family members since they lost access to 3X rooms in the house - I won't let anyone go near my gear). One of my New Years Resolutions for 2019 was to clear out the house of all my mining equipment so that's all about to go up on eBay. So "budget" is relative to whatever I "MUST" spend if I can't repurpose any of the parts I already have on hand for this build... (Anyone having something I "need" and is looking to barter for one of the items I'll list later on in here, LMK).
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Q3) When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.**

A3) IMMEDIATELY! :)
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Q4) What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc\)**

A4) Well I had a half-assed idea approximately 1 year ago that it might be wise to build a bunch of 'gaming rigs' to sell on eBay with my intended repurposed mining hardware so I went on a shopping spree for like 6 months. That said; I've got a plethora of various other components that aren't even unboxed yet. 90% of the items I've purchased for this additional project were items that were marked down via MIR (mail-in-rebates) & what-not...
AFAIK, there are only 3X items I absolutely do not have which I 'MUST' find. Those would be - 1) Motherboard which accepts "ECC RAM". 2) CPU for said MOBO. 3) Said "ECC RAM".\* 
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Q5) Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?**

A5) I'm located in Southwest Florida. No Microcenter's here. Best Buy is pretty much my only option although I am a member of Newegg, Amazon & Costco if that makes any difference?
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Q6) If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.**

A6) In an attempt to better clean up this Q&A, I'm going to list the items I have on-hand at the end of this questionnaire in-case passers-by feel like this might be a TLDR.* (Scroll to the bottom & you'll see what I mean).
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Q7) Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?**

A7) I don't think that's necessary for my intended purpose although - I'm not against it if that helps & FWIW, I'm pretty skilled @ this task already (it's not rocket science).
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Q8) Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)**

A8) As stated in A4; ECC RAM is non-negotiable... RAID seems like a logical application here as well.

- This will predominantly be receiving commands from MacOS computers. I don't think that matters really but figured it couldn't hurt to let you guys know.\*

- I'd also be quite fond of implementing "PFSENSE" (or something of that caliber) applied to this system so I could give my Netgear Nighthawks less stress in that arena, plus my limited understanding of PFSENSE is that it's ability to act as a firewall runs circles around anything that comes with consumer-grade Wi-Fi routers (like my Nighthawks). Just the same, I'm open to building a second rig just for the firewall.\*

- Another desirable feature would be that it draws as little electricity from the wall as possible. (I'm EXTREMELY skilled in this arena. I have "Kill-A-Watts" to test/gauge on, as well as an intimate understanding of the differences between Silver, Gold, Platinum and Titanium rated PSU's. As well as having already measured each of the PSU's I have on-hand and taken note of the 'target TDP draw' ("Peak Power Efficiency Draw") each one offers when primed with X amount of GPU's when I used them for their original purpose.\*

- Last, but not least, sound (as in noise created from the rig). I'd like to prop this device up on my entertainment center in the living room. I've (almost) all of the top-shelf consumer grade products one could dream of regarding fans and other thermal-related artifacts.

- Almost forgot; this will be hosting to devices on the KODI platform (unless you guys have better alternative suggestions?)
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Q9) Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?**

A9) Definitely! Desired theme would be WHITE. If that doesn't work for whatever reason, black or gray would suffice. Regarding "Case Size". Nah, that's not too important although I don't foresee a mini-ITX build making sense if I'm going to be cramming double digit amounts of TB in the system, Internal HDD's sounds better than a bunch of externals plugged in all the USB ports.
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Q10) Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?**

A10) I don't know. If I do need a copy of Windows, I don't have one so that's something I'll have to consider I guess. I doubt that's a necessity though.
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**Extra info or particulars:*\*

AND NOW TO THE FUN-STUFF... Here's a list of everything (PARTS PARTS PARTS) I have on-hand and ready to deploy into the wild &/or negotiate a trade/barter with:

CASES -
Corsair Carbide Series Air 540 Arctic White (Model# Crypto-Currency-9011048-WW) - (Probably my top pick for this build).
Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (This is probably my top 1st or 2nd pick for this build, the thing is a monster!).
Cooler Master Elite 130 - Mini ITX - Black
Cooler Master MasterBox 5 MID-Tower - Black & White
Raidmax Sigma-TWS - ATX - White
MasterBox Lite 5 - ATX - Black w/ diff. Colored accent attachments (included with purchase)
NZXT S340 Elite Matte White Steel/Tempered Glass Edition
EVGA DG-76 Alpine White - Mid Tower w/ window
EVGA DG-73 Black - Mid Tower w/ window (I have like 3 of these)

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CPU's -
***7TH GEN OR BELOW INTEL's ("Code Name Class mentioned next to each one)**\*
Pentium G4400 (Skylake @54W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE"
Celeron G3930 (Kaby Lake @ 51W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE" :)
i5 6402P (Skylake @65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i5 6600k (Skylake @ 91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 6700 (Skylake @ 65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 7700k (Kaby Lake @ 95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***8TH GEN INTEL's **\*
i3-8350K (Coffee Lake @91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC FRIENDLY" :)
I5-8600K (Coffee Lake @95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***AMD RYZEN's **\*
Ryzen 3 2200G
Ryzen 5 1600
Ryzen 7 1700X

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MOTHERBOARDS -

***7TH GEN AND BELOW INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
MSI Z170A-SLI
ASUS PRIME Z270-A
ASUS PRIME Z270-P
ASUS PRIME Z270-K
EVGA Z270 Stinger
GIGABYTE GA-Z270XP-SLI
MSI B150M ARCTIC
MSI B250M MICRO ATX (PRO OPT. BOOST EDITION)

***8TH GEN INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
EVGA Z370 FTW
GIGABYTE Z370XP SLI (Rev. 1.0)
MSI Z370 SLI PLUS


***AMD RYZEN BASED MOBO'S - **\*
ASUS ROG STRIX B350-F GAMING
MSI B350 TOMAHAWK
MSI X370 GAMING PRO
ASROCK AB350M PRO4
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RAM -

Way too many to list, nothing but 4 & 8GB DDR4 sticks and unfortunately, none are ECC so it's not even worth mentioning/listing these unless someone reading this is willing to barter. At which time I'd be obliged to send an itemized list or see if I have what they're/you're specifically looking for.\*
______________________
THERMAL APPLICATIONS/FANS -
JUST FANS -
BeQuiet -
Pure Wings 2 (80mm)
Pure Wings 2 (120mm)
Pure Wings 2 (140mm)
Silent Wings 3 PWM (120mm)

NOCTUA -
PoopBrown - NF-A20 PWM (200mm) Specifically for the BIG "CoolerMaster HAF XB EVO" Case
GREY - NF-P12 Redux - 1700RPM (120mm) PWM
Corsair -
Air Series AF120LED (120mm)

CPU COOLING SYSTEMS -
NOCTUA -
NT-HH 1.4ml Thermal Compound
NH-D15 6 Heatpipe system (this thing is the tits)

EVGA (Extremely crappy coding in the software here, I'm like 99.99% these will be problematic if I were to try and use in any OS outside of Windows, because they barely ever work in the intended Windows as it is).
CLC 240 (240mm Water-cooled system
CRYORIG -
Cryorig C7 Cu (Low-Profile Copper Edition*)

A few other oversized CPU cooling systems I forget off the top of my head but a CPU cooler is a CPU cooler after comparing to the previous 3 models I mentioned.
I almost exclusively am using these amazing "Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pads" as an alternative to thermal paste for my CPU's. They're not cheap but they literally last forever.

NZXT - Sentry Mesh Fan Controller
______________________
POWER SUPPLIES (PSU's) -
BeQuiet 550W Straight Power 11 (GOLD)

EVGA -
750P2 (750W, Platinum)
850P2 (850W, Platinum)
750T2 (750W, TITANIUM - yeah baby, yeah)

ROSEWILL -
Quark 750W Platinum
Quark 650W Platinum

SEASONIC -
Focus 750W Platinum
______________________
STORAGE -
HGST Ultrastar 3TB - 64mb Cache - 7200RPM Sata III (3.5)
4X Samsung 860 EVO 500GB SSD's
2X Team Group L5 LITE 3D 2.5" SSD's 480GB
2X WD 10TB Essential EXT (I'm cool with shucking)
+ 6X various other external HDD's (from 4-8TB) - (Seagate, WD & G-Drives)
______________________

Other accessories worth mentioning -
PCI-E to 4X USB hub-adapter (I have a dozen or so of these - might not be sufficient enough &/or needed but again, 'worth mentioning' in case I somehow ever run out of SATA & USB ports and have extra external USB HDD's. Although, I'm sure there would be better suited components if I get to that point that probably won't cost all that much).
______________________
______________________
______________________
Needless to say, I have at least 1X of everything mentioned above. In most all cases, I have multiples of these items but obviously won't be needing 2X CPU's, Cases, etc...

Naturally, I have GPU's. Specifically;

At least 1X of every. Single. NVIDIA GTX 1070 TI (Yes, I have every variation of the 1070 ti made by MSI, EVGA and Zotac. The only brand I don't have is the Gigabyte line. My partners have terrible experience with those so I didn't even bother. I'm clearly not going to be needing a GPU for this build but again, I'm cool with discussing the idea of a barter if anyone reading this is in the market for one.

I also have some GTX 1080 TI's but those are already spoken for, sorry.

It's my understanding that select CPU's I have on this list are ECC Friendly and AFAIK, only 1 of my MOBO's claims to be ECC Friendly (The ASROCK AB350M PRO4), but for the life of me, I can't find any corresponding forums that confirm this and/or direct me to a listing where I can buy compatible RAM. Just the same, if I go w/ the ASROCK MOBO, that means I'd be using one of the Ryzens. Those are DEF. power hungry little buggers. Not a deal-breaker, just hoping to find something a little more conservative in terms of TDP.


In closing, I don't really need someone to hold my hand with the build part as much as figuring out which motherboard, CPU and RAM to get. Then I'm DEFINITELY going to need some guidance on what OS is best for my desired purpose. If building 2X Rigs makes sense, I'm totally open to that as well...
Rig 1 = EPIC NAS SYSTEM
Rig 2 = EPIC PFSENSE (or the like) DEDICATED FIREWALL

Oh, I almost forgot... The current routers I'm using are...
1X Netgear Nighthawk 6900P (Modem + Router)
1X Netgear Nighthawk X6S (AC 4000 I believe - Router dedicated towards my personal devices - no IoT &/or Guests allowed on this one)
1X TP-Link Archer C5 (Router). Total overkill after implementing the Nighthawks but this old beast somehow has the best range, plus it has 2X USB ports so for now, it's dedicated towards my IoT devices.
---- I also have a few other Wi-Fi routers (Apple Airport Extreme & some inferior Netgear's but I can only allocate so many WiFi Routers to so many WiFi channels w/out pissing off my neighbors) On that note, I have managed to convince my neighbors to let me in their house/WiFi configuration so we all have our hardware locked on specific, non-competing frequencies/channels so everyone's happy. :)


Please spare me the insults as I insulted myself throughout this entire venture. Part of why I did this was because when I was a kid, I used to fantasize about building a 'DREAM PC' but could never afford such. To compensate for this deficiency, I would actually print out the latest and greatest hardware components on a word document, print the lists up & tape to wall (for motivation). I was C++ certified at the age of 14 and built my first PC when I was 7. At the age of 15 I abandoned all hope in the sector and moved on to other aspirations. This entire ordeal was largely based off me finally fulfilling a childhood fantasy. On that note = mission accomplished. Now if I'm actually able to fulfill my desires on this post, I'm definitely going to feel less shitty about blowing so much money on all this stuff over the last couple years.

TIA for assisting in any way possible. Gotta love the internets!


THE END.
:)

EDIT/UPDATE (5 hours after OP) - My inbox is being inundated with various people asking for prices and other reasonable questions about my hardware being up for sale. Not to be redundant but rather to expound on my previous remarks about 'being interested in a bartetrade' with any of you here...

I did say I was going to sell my gear on eBay in the near future, I also said I wanted to trade/barter for anything relative to helping me accomplish my OP's mission(s). I'm not desperate for the $$$ but I'm also not one of those people that likes to rip other people off. That said; I value my time and money invested in this hardware and I'm only willing to unload it all once I've established I have ZERO need for any of it here in my home first. Hence my writing this lengthy thread in an attempt to repurpose at least a grand or two I've already spent.

One of the most commonly asked questions I anticipate receiving from interested bodies is going to be "How hard were you on your hardware?" Contrary to what anyone else would have probably done in my scenario which is say they were light on it whether they were or weren't, I documented my handling of the hardware, and have no problem sharing such documentation with verified, interested buyers (WHEN THE TIME COMES) to offer you guys peace of mind.

I have photo's and video's of the venture from A-Z. I am also obliged to provide (redacted) electricity bill statements where you can correlate my photo's (power draw on each rig), and also accurately deduct the excess power my house consumed with our other household appliances. Even taking into consideration how much (more) I spent in electricity from keeping my house at a constant, cool 70-72F year-round (via my Nest thermostat). Even without the rigs, I keep my AC @ 70 when I'm home and for the last 1.5-2 years, I just so happened to spend 85% of my time here at my house. When I would travel, I'd keep it at 72 for my wife & kids.
Additionally; I had each GPU 'custom' oveunderclocke'd (MSI Afterburner for all GPU's but the EVGA's).*
I doubt everyone reading this is aware so this is for those that don't.... EVGA had the brilliant idea of implementing what they call "ICX technology" in their latest NVIDIA GTX GPU's. The short(est) explanation of this "feature" goes as follows:

EVGA GPU's w/ "ICX 9 & above" have EXTRA HEAT/THERMAL SENSORS. Unlike every other GTX 1070 ti on the market, the one's with this feature actually have each of 2/2 on-board fans connected to individual thermal sensors. Which means - if you were to use the MSI Afterburner program on one of these EVGA's and create a custom fan curve for it, you'd only be able to get 1/2 of the fans to function the way intended. The other fan simply would not engage as the MSI Afterburner software wasn't designed/coded to recognize/ communicate with an added sensor (let alone sensor'S). This, in-turn, would likely result in whoever's using it the unintended way having a GPU defect on them within the first few months I'd imagine... Perhaps if they had the TDP power settings dumbed down as much as I did (60-63%), they might get a year or two out of it since it wouldn't run as near as hot, but I doubt any longer than that since cutting off 50% of the cooling system on one of these can't be ignored too long, surely capacitors would start to blow and who knows what else...
(Warning = RANT) Another interesting side-note about the EVGA's and their "Precision-X" OveUnderclocking software is that it's designed to only recognize 4X GPU's on a single system. For miners, that's just not cool. My favorite builds had 8X and for the motherboards that weren't capable of maintaining stable sessions on 8, I set up with 6X. Only my EVGA Rigs had 3 or 4X GPU's dedicated to a single motherboard. Furthermore, and as stated in an earlier paragraph, (& this is just my opinion) = EVGA SOFTWARE SUCKS! Precision X wasn't friendly with every motherboard/CPU I threw at it and their extension software for the CLC Close-Loop-Cooling/ CPU water-coolers simply didn't work on anything, even integrating into their own Precision-X software. The amount of time it took me to finally find compatible matches with that stuff was beyond maddening. (END RANT).
Which leads me to my other comments on the matter. That's what I had every single 1070 ti set at for TDP = 60-63%. Dropping the power load that much allowed me to bring down (on average) each 1070 ti to a constant 110-115W (mind you, this is only possible w/ "Titanium" rated PSU's, Platinum comes pretty damn close to the Titanium though) while mining Ethereum and was still able to maintain a bottom of 30 MH/s and a ceiling of 32 MH/s. Increasing the TDP to 80, 90, 100% or more only increased my hashrates (yields) negligibly, like 35-36 MH/s TOPS, which also meant each one was not only pulling 160-180W+ (Vs. the aforementioned 115'ish range), it also meant my rigs were creating a significantly greater amount of heat! Fortunately for the GPU's and my own personal habits, I live in South Florida where it's hot as balls typically, last winter was nothing like this one. Increasing my yields by 10-15% didn't justify increasing the heat production in my house by >30%, nor the added electricity costs from subjecting my AC handlers to that much of an extra work-load. For anyone reading this that doesn't know/understand what I'm talking about - after spending no less than 2-3 hours with each. and. every. one. I didn't play with the settings on just one and universally apply the settings to the rest. I found the 'prime' settings and documented them with a label-maker and notepad. Here's the math in a more transparent manner:

*** I NEVER LET MY GPU's BREACH 61C, EVER. Only my 8X GPU rigs saw 60-61 & it was the ones I had in the center of the build (naturally). I have REALLY high power fans (used on BTC ASIC MINERS) that were sucking air from those GPU's which was the only way I was able to obtain such stellar results while mining with them. **\*
Mining at "acceptable" heat temps (not acceptable to me, but most of the internet would disagree = 70C) and overclocking accordingly brings in X amount of yields per unit. =
'Tweaking' (underclocking) the GPU's to my parameters reduced my yield per unit from -10-15%, but it SAVED me well over 30-35% in direct electricity consumption, and an unknown amount of passive electricity consumption via creating approximately 20%+ less heat for my AC handler to combat.

I say all this extra stuff not just for anyone interested in mining with their GPU's, but really to answer (in-depth) the apparent questions you people are asking me in PM's. Something else that should help justify my claims of being so conservative should be the fact I only have/used "Platinum and Titanium" rated PSU's. Heat production, power efficiency and longevity of the hardware were ALWAYS my top priority.* . I truly thought Crypto would continue to gain and/or recover and bounce back faster than it did. If this project had maintained positive income for 12 months+, I'd have expanded one of our sites to also cater to GPU mining on a gnarly scale.

Once I have my NAS (& possibly 2nd rig for the firewall) successfully built, I'll be willing/able to entertain selling you guys some/all of the remaining hardware prior to launching on eBay. If there's something you're specifically looking for that I listed having, feel free to PM me with that/those specific item(s). Don't count on an immediate response but what you can count on is me honoring my word in offering whoever asks first right of refusal when the time comes for me to sell this stuff. Fortunately for me, PM's are time-stamped so that's how I'll gauge everyone's place in line. I hope this extra edit answers most of the questions you guys wanted to have answered and if not, sorry I guess. I'll do my best to bring light to anything I've missed out on after I realize whatever that error was/is. The only way anyone is getting first dibs on my hardware otherwise is if they either offer compelling insight into my original questions, or have something I need to trade w/.

THE END (Round#2)


submitted by Im-Ne-wHere to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

THE END OF ALL ASIC MINERS? - Monero's New Superweapon: "Time Locked Proof of Non-ASIC work challenge reward" algorithms.

I propose the following algorithm to end this War of attrition with ASIC / FPGA manufacturers , hopefully once and for all and save us Precious PoW Tweaks during the upcoming forks.
"A time-locked, Proof of 'Non-ASIC work' Challenge reward algorithm"
Here's an image to help you visualise how the algorithm works (details below):
https://imgur.com/a/9S8dA
Here's why we need it:
ASIC manufacturers mine in Secret to attack our decentralized network. They'll win the war since they'll 'get their investment back' before we brick their ASICs, allowing them to launch never-ending attacks against our decentralization, for eternity.
Quick Overview
This algorithm uses the concept of "time-locked reward challenges".
The algorithm ‘time-locks’ the reward, then issues a ‘non-ASIC’ work challenge during each regular PoW Fork, which distributes mined rewards only to CPU and GPU miners who can pass the challenge and prove they are not ASICS, by maintaining their hashrate during the ASIC downtime.
These Hash-rate challenges after PoW Forks successfully ‘detect’, and ‘Severely Penalize’ anyone Mining with an ASIC/FPGA, even those in Secret.
Proof of Concept: An Actual Demonstration
I'll demonstrate this algorithm in action:
Please see this image to help you Visualise how the algorithm works:
https://imgur.com/a/9S8dA
There is a critical flaw and uniquely identifying feature that exists in absolutely 'ALL ASIC and FPGA miners', even those mining in Secret.
As most of you may know, with the upcoming V7 PoW hardfork,
Instead of just destroying an ASIC with a fork, we can further exploit this to attack the ASIC Manufacturer or Miner by taking back all their mined rewards and giving them to the community
The Special timeframe is PoW Fork + 'N' Days. ('N' being however many days remaining where it would be "impossible" to build and startup a new ASIC/FPGA after the fork.)
To exploit this, the algorithm introduces a period of time called the "Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe" (MRCT), the time period in between regular PoW Hardforks. the grey shaded area in this image
This "Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe" is a time whereby all mining profit rewards are 'time-locked' or held hostage in escrow, on either the mining pool, or on the Actual Blockchain code itself, or Both, depending on where this algorithm is eventually deployed.
The algorithm stores the wallet address a mining reward belongs to, and the maximum hash rate (or maximum value adjusted share rate per day) observed during the "Mining rewards collection timeframe" for that particular wallet address.
This "Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe" can be of any duration as required by the developers; 1,2,3,4,5,6 Months or longer . The longer This Timeframe, the more dangerous it is to ASIC miners. Meaning we don't have to rush with forks.
Since it's time-locked, mined coins/rewards cannot be cashed out until the coming challenge; However, mining pools can still choose to payout smaller miners before that time if they have a 'good stable Non-Asic Hash challenge passing history', or a deposit on file, or at their own risk, so most good miners don't have to wait to cashout rewards!. Big miners on the other hand, won't care! Why? Because the delay doesn't cost them anything. (it's a TINY TINY inconvenience compared to the damage ASICs would do to GPU mining profits. I hope this makes sense)
Now for the Critical ANTI-ASIC Work Challenge.
Time passes and the mining rewards collection timeframe ends with a Hardfork that changes the PoW algorithm slightly,
All ASICS and FPGAs are INSTANTLY destroyed.
At the same time, the mining rewards from that collection timeframe are now ready to be paid out.
Since only the CPU / GPU miners are able to hash normally,
The Algorithm now issues a Hash Rate challenge to determine how much of the coins mined were actually mined by ASIC or FPGA miners.
The challenge is nothing special. Miners just have to leave their miners running normally at maximum speed for the period of the challenge, same as they do everyday!
During this challenge, their "Average Maximum Hash rate during the challenge" is compared to the "Maximum Hash Rate speed" recorded on the blockchain during the Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe.
See the green dotted line in the image
Thus at this point, since ASICs are DEAD, they cannot Hash at the same rate during this challenge period, so any significant difference in hashrate would thus clearly indicate the use of an ASIC or FPGA miner.
Now, we have all the information we need to STRIP ASIC Miners of ALL their gains, and Reward GPU miners instead.
As shown in the earlier image
What if a 1 GPU breaks in a 12 GPU mining farm during the challenge? (Very rare) or for some reason, you can't mine during that period? then the miner can simply rent the GPUs from nicehash for the Challenge. An ASIC miner however, cannot use this strategy (because ASICS are not GPUs, explained further below). Also we can implement a 2nd chance option; the confiscated reward may be frozen for the next Cycle; and the miner may get a 2nd chance to prove the hashrate again, with a % reward penalty.
The Beautiful thing is that If ASIC miners fail the challenge, Everyone gets a Bonus share of the Reward Forefitted by the ASIC miners, So Everyone wants the ASIC miners to fail so they get Free extra money. and thus have a financial reason to support this algorithm.
*There is no escaping it... or is there?
Is it ASIC PROOF? Can you Cheat this algorithm?
I've also tried to see if you can work around this algorithm:
  • Example 1: What if they switched in GPUS to mine for an ASIC during the challenge? Well, that wouldn't work. When the challenge comes, they can either save the rewards mined by the GPUs, or save the rewards mined by the ASICs, One will always be lost and result is the same anyway because you'd only get paid for the Hash rate of the GPU. The ASIC portion of the hash rate will ALWAYS be lost.
  • Example 2: What if they use the GPUs to mine a different coin and have them only hash for the ASIC during the challenge period?
  • Consider the Antminer X3. at 200KH/s, to support just "ONE ASIC", they would need over 200 RX 580 Cards or 100 VEGA cards to pass the challenge... costing well over $60,000 (SIXTY THOUSAND DOLLARS) and if they depreciate at ~ 10~15% a year, they'd lose $6000~$9000 a year. it's not enough to cover your losses,
  • Also, What other coin could you mine? If ASICS are so powerful, there won't be another coin except those running this algorithm. Then, the dev can choose to issue the challenge at the same point as the other coin using the same algorithm, so they lose all rewards from one coin as 1 rig cannot sustain two challenge algorithms at the same time.
  • Example 3: What if they just leave some GPUS on standby to avoid the power costs? Then ASIC's would still be unable to be mass produced anyway. Because for every ASIC Mass produced, you'd need to Mass Produce 200 times the GPUS to support them in their place, and own of all them. practically impossible.
  • Example 4: What if they rented hashing power from Nicehash to fill in during the Challenge period?
  • Yes, but so can we! The beautiful thing about this algorithm, is if we rent the limited hashing power on Nicehash first before them at break even or loss, it doesn't matter, Because, the ASIC miner cannot rent and hash rate and will fail the challenge, and Forefit the ENORMOUS amount of Rewards to the community. Imagine, Mining at such a high rate for months on end , the rewards confiscated and paid to GPU miners will easily offset any of the tiny losses renting hashrate from Nicehash, so ultimately, The ASIC miners lose Everything, and the community (you and me) gets all their money.
  • Also if ASICs Dominate the crypto market, there won't be any GPU to rent, all remaining coins would be mining this algorithm, meaning they would have to save their own hashrate for themselves, not rent it to ASIC miners. otherwise they lose their reward. Brand new users may rent their GPU's but its no where near enough to cover the ASIC hash shortfall in the challenge.
  • Example 5: What if they waited till we exhausted our supply of PoW fork tweaks? That's the beauty of this algorithm!. We don't actually have to tweak the PoW algorithm on a constant basis! We can intentionally leave it the same. So Everyone passes the Challenge, Then when we do detect an asic "trying to Mine their Money Back in secret (as they do now)", We tweak the PoW at the Next Hardfork. Destroying and bankrupting their very first attempt, and we get all their money and rewards, So there's no need to waste a PoW tweak in a pre-emptive strike, because the rewards are Time-Locked to the future. We can lie in wait with a single PoW like a Trap, and eat them alive (literally we get all their rewards after the challenge!). We can maintain this lethal threat to ASIC manufacturers without having to change the PoW at all!
And remember, all this effort is just for ONLY, ONE ASIC. meaning you Can't mass produce it.
So ultimately it wouldn't even make sense to even develop an ASIC, as you'd be far more profitable just mining only with the 200+ GPU's required to cheat the algorithm.
*So in summary, *
  • No ASIC/FPGA miner can escape the challenge. Not even those running in secret.
  • All ASIC miners are guaranteed to suffer a huge (possibly fatal) financial loss, with no prospect of any return on investment. Time locked rewards ensure No secret pre-mining with ASICs is possible. ASICs are destroyed with each challenge, all R&D and manufacturing costs and the electricity bill used to power them is wasted for basically "ZERO returns",
  • …..and lets not forget that all their rewards gets given away to other honest miners like you and Me!. ( LOL!) or potentially the developers of the fork :)
  • As long as the algorithm is active and used by multiple coins, no ASICs will ever exist to mine in secret,
  • We save precious PoW tweak changes, since there's no need for a pre-emptive PoW strike to prevent 'ASIC hit and run' pre-mine scenarios.
  • ASIC manufacturers see that the war is un-winnable and go invest in other things,
So, in theory, The War Ends. (at least for a very good part of the future)
As they say: " Don't build a wall and hide in fear.... Build a wall and launch missiles from behind it against the enemy so they will never dare attack us again."
I would like to point out that time locked reward challenges are already in use by the Olympic games to Strip drug cheats in the past by storing samples and testing them in the future, and it's also in the PPLNS minig pool algorithms to deter pool hopping cheats, and also in the Bitcoin's Lightning network in the form of decrementing time-locks" that 'enforce the transfer of funds' under certain conditions.
Is it beautiful? Will it work? Can it be done? Let's discuss this
submitted by MoneroChan to Monero [link] [comments]

Y'all helped me last time, and I'm now looking to upgrade. Help me build a new rig?

Tl;Dr: I have an i3, 8 gb of ram, and a GTX 960--help me build a new pc so i can appropriately game again?

A few years back, I got some help building my current rig--but I went TOO budget and need to upgrade.
That build (which I am currently posting from) is here: https://pcpartpicker.com/useG1ng3rBr3dd/saved/#view=bGybt6
Specs:
- Intel i3-6100 CPU
- GeForce GTX 960 GPU
- G-Skill Single Slot 8gb RAM
- Corsair CX 500 PSU
- Asus VX238H-W 23.0" 1920x1080 Monitor (I think I need a higher fps monitor from what I've been told)
- Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mini Tower Case
- Gigabyte GA-H110M-A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard
Gaming has been increasingly difficult and I want to actually enjoy gaming again without falling victim to being the lowest frame rate/highest latency on every server I enter.
I gamed on my buddy's pc the other day and I was floored. I'm unsure what his specs are, but it made me realize that mine is just holding me back.
I don't need a ProGaming+Streaming+Bitcoin Farming BEAST of a PC. I just want to enjoy gaming again and be able to for a few years with minimal upgrades.
I really like PCpartpicker.com as I'm ignorant and it's highly user-friendly so if you are bored and like doing this stuff, I'd really appreciate the help picking the best parts for what I'm looking for at a price I can justify to myself.
My top-tier budget is around $1200 but that may be insanely high or insanely low for what I'm asking; I'm not really sure. If I can keep and use some of the parts I already have (Tower case, motherboard [maybe], PSU[?]) That'd be awesome but I understand If I can't.
Thank you for reading and thank you in advance if you decide to venture into this for me. I appreciate y'all.
submitted by G1ng3rBr3dd to PcMasterRaceBuilds [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

This is a crosspost from /hardware, but I will be editing this independently based on community feedback and guidelines. Prior to posting here, I reached out to your local mod staff to ensure that I wasn't stepping on any toes, given the nature of its content. I hope you find this useful.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading.
submitted by jaykresge to pcgaming [link] [comments]

Immersion cooling mining farm. Beeminer - YouTube How I built a 48-GPU Mining Farm  GTX 1060s at 14,000 sol/s Crypto Mining Farm at Apartment  January 2020 Update ... $80,000 Mining Rig Interview - 70x 1080tis! - YouTube How I Built My Small Mining Farm - YouTube

26 GPU Mining Farm Cooling. This next build I must admit I don’t know what I was thinking, but after getting the itch for mining crypto, I decided to go big this time and build an 18’x20′ metal mining shop. Not only did I go big on buying the shop but also spent the next three months buying enough GPU’s to build 26 mining rigs. A mining rig – nowadays, professional miners use ASIC machines to mine. ASICs are powerful devices specially designed for mining cryptocurrencies. An Internet-enabled computer; Power source – you need at least 1000 Kilowatts of power every week to run a small mining farm. Cooling fan – the mining equipment release a lot of heat. You need a good fan to keep the rig and your house cool ... 15 Grafikkarten im Mining-Benchmark. Die Teilnahme am Ethereum-Netzwerk setzt einen PC mit Windows, Linux oder Mac OS und mindestens einer ausreichend energieeffizienten und leistungsstarken GPU ... Natürlich sprechen auch viele Punkte für ein GPU-Mining-Rig mit 4, 5 oder gar 6 GPU’s doch ein passendes Gehäuse für diese Systeme gibt es oft nicht, sodass sich solche Mining-Rigs eher schwer im privaten Haushalt oder im Rechenzentrum unterbringen lassen. Dies gilt insbesondere im privaten Haushalt dann, wenn sich Kinder oder Tiere im Haushalt befinden und Zutritt zu den Räumlichkeiten ... Bitmine Farm, home to ASIC Bitcoin Miners and the official Bitcoin virtual mining farm, start today FREE 500MH/s on sign up! Home; Explore; Invite; LOG IN; SIGN UP; BIT MINE FARM. The world's leading Bitcoin cold-wallet backed, hardware based mining pool. Start your Bitcoin mining journey today. FREE 500 GH/s on first sign up ! REGISTER NOW. LOGIN. Antminer Z9 Mini 2000 GH/s Earnings : 0 ...

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Immersion cooling mining farm. Beeminer - YouTube

I had the opportunity to sit down with one of the partners invested in an $80,000 mining rig pulling in $6,000 -$8,000 per month. Hopefully, these answers wi... SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE HOW MUCH - http://shorturl.at/arBHL Nviddia GTX 1080 Ti - https://amzn.to/2Hiw5xp 6X GPU Mining Rig Case - https://bitcoinmerch.com/produc... I started accepting clients who want me to build mining rigs for them. Here's one of the client builds I want to share to everyone. A small mining farm running 48 GTX 1060's with hynix memories ... The virtual goldrush to mine Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies leads us to Central Washington state where a Bitcoin mine generates roughly $70,000 a day min... 330 Rigs with 7 GPUs each ranging across 12 different types of GPUs (85% of them being Sapphire RX470 4GB and 8GB Mining Edition cards) RX580 8GB, RX480 8GB, GTX 1070, 1080's, 1080ti's and a range ...

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