Visualizing Bitcoin OTC Trust Networks - GitHub Pages

vectorbt - blazingly fast backtesting and interactive data analysis for quants

I want to share with you a tool that I was continuously developing during the last couple of months.
https://github.com/polakowo/vectorbt

As a data scientist, when I first started flirting with quant trading, I quickly realized that there is a shortage of Python packages that can actually enable me to iterate over a long list of possible strategies and hyper-parameters quickly. Most open-source backtesting libraries are very evolved in terms of functionality, but simply lack speed. Questions like "Which strategy is better: X or Y?" require fast computation and transformation of data. This not only prolongs your lifecycle of designing strategies, but is dangerous after all: limited number of tests is similar to a tunnel vision - it prevents you from seeing the bigger picture and makes you dive into the market blindly.
After trying tweaking pandas, multiprocessing, and even evaluating my strategies on a cluster with Spark, I finally found myself using Numba - a Python library that can compile slow Python code to be run at native machine code speed. And since there were no packages in the Python ecosystem that could even closely match the speed of my own backtests, I made vectorbt.
vectorbt combines pandas, NumPy and Numba sauce to obtain orders-of-magnitude speedup over other libraries. It builds upon the idea that each instance of a trading strategy can be represented in a vectorized form, so multiple strategy instances can be packed into a single multi-dimensional array. In this form, they can processed in a highly efficient manner and compared easily. It also integrates Plotly and ipywidgets to display complex charts and dashboards akin to Tableau right in the Jupyter notebook. You can find basic examples and explanations in the documentation.

Below is an example of doing in total 67,032 tests on three different timeframes of Bitcoin price history to explore how performance of a MACD strategy depends upon various combinations of fast, slow and signal windows:
import vectorbt as vbt import numpy as np import yfinance as yf from itertools import combinations, product # Fetch daily price of Bitcoin price = yf.Ticker("BTC-USD").history(period="max")['Close'] price = price.vbt.split_into_ranges(n=3) # Define hyper-parameter space # 49 fast x 49 slow x 19 signal fast_windows, slow_windows, signal_windows = vbt.indicators.create_param_combs( (product, (combinations, np.arange(2, 51, 1), 2), np.arange(2, 21, 1))) # Run MACD indicator macd_ind = vbt.MACD.from_params( price, fast_window=fast_windows, slow_window=slow_windows, signal_window=signal_windows, hide_params=['macd_ewm', 'signal_ewm'] ) # Long when MACD is above zero AND signal entries = macd_ind.macd_above(0) & macd_ind.macd_above(macd_ind.signal) # Short when MACD is below zero OR signal exits = macd_ind.macd_below(0) | macd_ind.macd_below(macd_ind.signal) # Build portfolio portfolio = vbt.Portfolio.from_signals( price.vbt.tile(len(fast_windows)), entries, exits, fees=0.001, freq='1D') # Draw all window combinations as a 3D volume fig = portfolio.total_return.vbt.volume( x_level='macd_fast_window', y_level='macd_slow_window', z_level='macd_signal_window', slider_level='range_start', template='plotly_dark', trace_kwargs=dict( colorscale='Viridis', colorbar=dict( title='Total return', tickformat='%' ) ) ) fig.show() 

https://reddit.com/link/hxl6bn/video/180sxqa8mzc51/player
From signal generation to data visualization, the example above needs roughly a minute to run.

vectorbt let's you
The current implementation has limitations though:

If it sounds cool enough, try it out! I would love if you'd give me some feedback and contribute to it at some point, as the codebase has grown very fast. Cheers.
submitted by plkwo to algotrading [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: programming top posts from 2019-10-22 to 2020-10-21 06:41 PDT

Period: 364.67 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 180545
Rate (per day) 2.74 491.84
Unique Redditors 629 34951
Combined Score 1178903 2688497

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 47468 points, 49 submissions: iamkeyur
    1. One Guy Ruined Hacktoberfest 2020 (3039 points, 584 comments)
    2. AWS forked my project and launched it as its own service (2956 points, 810 comments)
    3. Privacy analysis of Tiktok’s app and website (2858 points, 234 comments)
    4. 98.css – design system for building faithful recreations of Windows 98 UIs (2781 points, 318 comments)
    5. Microsoft demos language model that writes code based on signature and comment (2621 points, 614 comments)
    6. Why does HTML think “chucknorris” is a color? (2565 points, 531 comments)
    7. Windows 95 UI Design (2309 points, 665 comments)
    8. The Linux codebase has over 3k TODO comments, many from over a decade ago (2119 points, 369 comments)
    9. eBay is port scanning visitors to their website (1829 points, 236 comments)
    10. Using const/let instead of var can make JavaScript code run 10× slower in Webkit (1814 points, 525 comments)
  2. 44853 points, 28 submissions: speckz
    1. From August, Chrome will start blocking ads that consume 4MB of network data, 15 seconds of CPU usage in any 30 second period, or 60 seconds of total CPU usage (8434 points, 590 comments)
    2. How To Spot Toxic Software Jobs From Their Descriptions (6246 points, 1281 comments)
    3. A Facebook crawler was making 7M requests per day to my stupid website (2662 points, 426 comments)
    4. Apple, Your Developer Documentation is Garbage (2128 points, 432 comments)
    5. The code I’m still ashamed of (2016) (2105 points, 429 comments)
    6. Slack Is Fumbling Developers And The Rise Of Developer Discords (2095 points, 811 comments)
    7. The Chromium project finds that around 70% of our serious security bugs are memory safety problems. Our next major project is to prevent such bugs at source. (1959 points, 418 comments)
    8. Advice to Myself When Starting Out as a Software Developer (1934 points, 257 comments)
    9. Software patents are another kind of disease (1893 points, 419 comments)
    10. My favourite Git commit (1772 points, 206 comments)
  3. 35237 points, 28 submissions: whackri
    1. It is perfectly OK to only code at work, you can have a life too (6765 points, 756 comments)
    2. Kernighan's Law - Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it. (5171 points, 437 comments)
    3. The entire Apollo 11 computer code that helped get us to the Moon is available on github. (3841 points, 433 comments)
    4. Raytracing - in Excel! (2478 points, 168 comments)
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    7. fork() can fail: this is important (1591 points, 264 comments)
    8. Learn how computers add numbers and build a 4 bit adder circuit (1548 points, 66 comments)
    9. Heroes Of Might And Magic III engine written from scratch (open source, playable) (1453 points, 84 comments)
    10. Apollo Guidance Computer: Restoring the computer that put man on the Moon (1277 points, 47 comments)
  4. 14588 points, 11 submissions: pimterry
    1. I'm a software engineer going blind, how should I prepare? (4237 points, 351 comments)
    2. The 2038 problem is already affecting some systems (1988 points, 518 comments)
    3. TLDR pages: Simplified, community-driven man pages (1897 points, 182 comments)
    4. JetBrains Mono: A Typeface for Developers (1728 points, 456 comments)
    5. BlurHash: extremely compact representations of image placeholders (930 points, 159 comments)
    6. Let's Destroy C (855 points, 290 comments)
    7. Shared Cache is Going Away (833 points, 192 comments)
    8. XML is almost always misused (766 points, 538 comments)
    9. Wireshark has a new packet diagram view (688 points, 24 comments)
    10. fork() can fail: this is important (460 points, 299 comments)
  5. 14578 points, 9 submissions: magenta_placenta
    1. Trello handed over user's personal account to user's previous company (2962 points, 489 comments)
    2. Feds: IBM did discriminate against older workers in making layoffs - “Analysis shows it was primarily older workers (85.85%) in the total potential pool of those considered for layoff,” the EEOC wrote (2809 points, 509 comments)
    3. Stripe Workers Who Relocate Get $20,000 Bonus and a Pay Cut - Stripe Inc. plans to make a one-time payment of $20,000 to employees who opt to move out of San Francisco, New York or Seattle, but also cut their base salary by as much as 10% (2765 points, 989 comments)
    4. US court fully legalized website scraping and technically prohibited it - On September 9, the U.S. 9th circuit court of Appeals ruled that web scraping public sites does not violate the CFAA (Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) (2014 points, 327 comments)
    5. I Suspect many Task Deadlines are Designed to Force Engineers to Work for Free (1999 points, 553 comments)
    6. Intent to Deprecate and Freeze: The User-Agent string (1012 points, 271 comments)
    7. Contractor admits planting logic bombs in his software to ensure he’d get new work (399 points, 182 comments)
    8. AlphaStar: Grandmaster level in StarCraft II using multi-agent reinforcement learning (396 points, 97 comments)
    9. Half of the websites using WebAssembly use it for malicious purposes - WebAssembly not that popular: Only 1,639 sites of the Top 1 Million use WebAssembly (222 points, 133 comments)
  6. 13750 points, 3 submissions: pedrovhb
    1. Bubble sort visualization (7218 points, 276 comments)
    2. Breadth-first search visualization (3874 points, 96 comments)
    3. Selection sort visualization (2658 points, 80 comments)
  7. 11833 points, 1 submission: flaming_bird
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  8. 11208 points, 10 submissions: PowerOfLove1985
    1. No cookie consent walls — and no, scrolling isn’t consent, says EU data protection body (5975 points, 890 comments)
    2. Redesigning uBlock Origin (1184 points, 162 comments)
    3. Playing Around With The Fuchsia Operating System (696 points, 164 comments)
    4. Microsoft's underwater data centre resurfaces after two years (623 points, 199 comments)
    5. Microsoft Paint/Paintbrush in Javascript (490 points, 58 comments)
    6. GitHub shuts off access to Aurelia repository, citing trade sanctions (478 points, 81 comments)
    7. How 3D Game Rendering Works: Texturing (475 points, 22 comments)
    8. Simdjson: Parsing Gigabytes of JSON per Second (441 points, 90 comments)
    9. How 1500 bytes became the MTU of the internet (435 points, 60 comments)
    10. It’s OK for your open source library to be a bit shitty (411 points, 130 comments)
  9. 10635 points, 8 submissions: michalg82
    1. Turning animations to 60fps using AI (3449 points, 234 comments)
    2. Bug #1463112 “Cat sitting on keyboard crashes lightdm” (3150 points, 143 comments)
    3. Heroes Of Might And Magic III engine written from scratch (open source, playable) (1431 points, 172 comments)
    4. Vulkan is coming to Raspberry Pi: first triangle - Raspberry Pi (1318 points, 66 comments)
    5. An EPYC trip to Rome: AMD is Cloudflare's 10th-generation Edge server CPU (431 points, 60 comments)
    6. Microsoft cancels GDC 2020 presence due to coronavirus concerns (Following Sony, Facebook, Kojima Productions, Epic Games, Unity, and more) (371 points, 52 comments)
    7. Moving from reCAPTCHA to hCaptcha - The Cloudflare Blog (278 points, 71 comments)
    8. How much of a genius-level move was using binary space partitioning in Doom? (207 points, 109 comments)
  10. 10106 points, 10 submissions: SerenityOS
    1. Someone suggested I should host my website on my own OS. For that we'll need a web server, so here's me building a basic web server in C++ for SerenityOS! (2269 points, 149 comments)
    2. I've been learning about OS security lately. Here's me making a local root exploit for SerenityOS, and then fixing the kernel bugs that made it possible! (1372 points, 87 comments)
    3. SerenityOS was hacked in a 36c3 CTF! (Exploit and write-up) (1236 points, 40 comments)
    4. One week ago, I started building a JavaScript engine for SerenityOS. Here’s me integrating it with the web browser and adding some simple API’s like alert()! (1169 points, 63 comments)
    5. Implementing macOS-style "purgeable memory" in my kernel. This technique is amazing and helps apps be better memory usage citizens! (1131 points, 113 comments)
    6. SerenityOS: The second year (900 points, 101 comments)
    7. Using my own C++ IDE to make a little program for decorating my webcam frame (571 points, 33 comments)
    8. This morning I ported git to SerenityOS. It took about an hour and some hacks, but it works! :D (547 points, 64 comments)
    9. Smarter C/C++ inlining with attribute((flatten)) (521 points, 118 comments)
    10. Introduction to SerenityOS GUI programming (390 points, 45 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. XANi_ (10753 points, 821 comments)
  2. dnew (7513 points, 641 comments)
  3. drysart (7479 points, 202 comments)
  4. MuonManLaserJab (6666 points, 233 comments)
  5. SanityInAnarchy (6331 points, 350 comments)
  6. AngularBeginner (6215 points, 59 comments)
  7. SerenityOS (5627 points, 128 comments)
  8. chucker23n (5465 points, 370 comments)
  9. IshKebab (4898 points, 393 comments)
  10. L3tum (4857 points, 199 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code by flaming_bird (11833 points, 956 comments)
  2. hentAI: Detecting and removing censors with Deep Learning and Image Segmentation by 7cmStrangler (9621 points, 395 comments)
  3. US Politicians Want to Ban End-to-End Encryption by CarrotRobber (9427 points, 523 comments)
  4. From August, Chrome will start blocking ads that consume 4MB of network data, 15 seconds of CPU usage in any 30 second period, or 60 seconds of total CPU usage by speckz (8434 points, 590 comments)
  5. Mozilla: The Greatest Tech Company Left Behind by matthewpmacdonald (7566 points, 1087 comments)
  6. Bubble sort visualization by pedrovhb (7218 points, 276 comments)
  7. During lockdown my wife has been suffering mentally from pressure to stay at her desk 100% of the time otherwise after a few minutes her laptop locks and she is recorded as inactive. I wrote this small app to help her escape her desk by periodically moving the cursor. Hopefully it can help others. by silitbang6000 (7193 points, 855 comments)
  8. It is perfectly OK to only code at work, you can have a life too by whackri (6765 points, 756 comments)
  9. Blockchain, the amazing solution for almost nothing by imogenchampagne (6725 points, 1561 comments)
  10. Blockchain, the amazing solution for almost nothing by jessefrederik (6524 points, 1572 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 2975 points: deleted's comment in hentAI: Detecting and removing censors with Deep Learning and Image Segmentation
  2. 2772 points: I_DONT_LIE_MUCH's comment in 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code
  3. 2485 points: api's comment in Stripe Workers Who Relocate Get $20,000 Bonus and a Pay Cut - Stripe Inc. plans to make a one-time payment of $20,000 to employees who opt to move out of San Francisco, New York or Seattle, but also cut their base salary by as much as 10%
  4. 2484 points: a_false_vacuum's comment in Stack Overflow lays off 15%
  5. 2464 points: iloveparagon's comment in Google engineer breaks down the problems he uses when doing technical interviews. Lots of advice on algorithms and programming.
  6. 2384 points: why_not_both_bot's comment in During lockdown my wife has been suffering mentally from pressure to stay at her desk 100% of the time otherwise after a few minutes her laptop locks and she is recorded as inactive. I wrote this small app to help her escape her desk by periodically moving the cursor. Hopefully it can help others.
  7. 2293 points: ThatInternetGuy's comment in Iranian Maintainer refuses to merge code from Israeli Developer. Cites Iranian regulations.
  8. 2268 points: xequae's comment in I'm a software engineer going blind, how should I prepare?
  9. 2228 points: turniphat's comment in AWS forked my project and launched it as its own service
  10. 2149 points: Rami-Slicer's comment in 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by flpezet to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

[WRITEUP] Criticism of r/privacy and r/privacytoolsio moderation censorship and how Apple/Brave/Chrome/GrapheneOS cult armies are destroying privacy communities

Hello! I wanted to discuss this on the soon-to-come occasion of 400 subscribers (398 as I write this), but I guess I will do it now, since the time is just right. This is a long post, so embrace yourself. This is an untalked topic, and you will rarely, if ever, find a record or post about the same.
Censorship in privacy communities is ironic, especially when the communities stand as the biggest ones on reddit. A lot of voices either go silent by account deletion and reappearing as new usernames, or they never speak up since they have been effectively "banned" so have no representation. A lot of this can be easily credited to folks breaking rules, which moderation would claim is certainly a need to manage large public forums. However, there is a section of people who criticise the Apple/Brave/Chrome/GrapheneOS cult armies, and this is where the problem starts to rise.

THE FOUR CULT ANTI-PRIVACY ARMIES

APPLE

Apple cult armies are in denial of Apple devices being privacy nightmares due to being closed source blackboxes. These are good for no more than protecting your data from your nosy girlfriend or the neighbour computer whiz kid.
There is plenty of evidence that goes to prove why Apple devices are nightmares for privacy. This is a comprehensive list of links, images and articles for read:
https://gist.github.com/iosecure/357e724811fe04167332ef54e736670d
https://i.imgur.com/n8Bk0bA.jpg
Siri still recording conversations 9 months later despite Apple's promise to not do it: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2020/05/20/apple_siri_transcriptions/
Apple Mail vulnerability, and Apple's denial of acceptance of the flaw: https://9to5mac.com/2020/04/27/iphone-mail-vulnerabilities-2/
Apple sells certificates to third-party developers that allow them to track users: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2019/01/apples-hypocritical-defense-data-privacy/581680/
Apple themselves were one of the main partners buying data from Facebook: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/06/03/technology/facebook-device-partners-users-friends-data.html
The San Ferdandino shooter thing was completely fraudulent: https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-technology/internet-privacy/one-fbis-major-claims-iphone-case-fraudulent
Louis Rossmann dismantles Apple's PR stunt "repair program": https://invidio.us/watch?v=rwgpTDluufY

Brave

Brave Browser is funded by DoD: https://np.reddit.com/privatelife/comments/fe34ls/exclusive_brave_browser_funded_by_dod_contracto
Brave traffic detected with Cryptocompare despite BAT rewards disabled: https://removeddit.com/privacytoolsIO/comments/gr8nue/
Brave also has a known history of whitelisting Facebook and Twitter trackers, and has a crippled adblocker that does not work on Brave's "acceptable" advertisements.
NEW EVIDENCE (June 6, 2020): Brave Browser hardcoded their crypto partner Binance referral links (https://twitter.com/cryptonator1337/status/1269201480105578496) alongwith Ledger and soon-to-be-compromised Coinbase (https://decrypt.co/31461/coinbase-wants-to-identify-bitcoin-users-for-dea-irs)

Chrome

These people are partly joint with the GrapheneOS cult, primarily due to its lead developer orchestrating all these things in hindsight and his followers purposely sharing his opinion garbage as "facts".
Most of this was debunked by u/saintjohnny (no longer on reddit) here: https://removeddit.com/firefox/comments/gokcis/
Ridiculous things like lead developer accusing firefox of being a "deployed" army against him and 4chan being used to harm his image: https://i.postimg.cc/3RwLT8Nj/Screenshot-from-2020-05-26-23-10-20.png

GrapheneOS

The moderator u trai_dep has taken his time to censor me off completely, so that none of my criticisms can be ever read about his dictatorial moderation and the GrapheneOS discussion I had with its lead developer, who at the end gave me plenty evidence about his rudeness, ironically which was against the rules of the subreddit.
https://removeddit.com/privacytoolsIO/comments/gs4uv7/_/fs2ysdm/
Criticism of GrapheneOS lies on one of his comments about OnePlus and Xiaomi apparently not making good enough devices: https://np.reddit.com/privacytoolsIO/comments/gs4uv7/i_dont_fully_trust_grapheneos/fs82fdv/
There is also the issue that he always claims Google Pixel 3/3a is a must with Titan M chip running non verifiable code that one has to rely on for Google's claim of being same as open sourced code, and that it does not have spyware. And he maintains his stand about developing the ROM exclusively for the Pixel devices, which also house Pixel Visual Core, a proprietary Google-only CPU+GPU unit independent of the Snapdragon SoC and with negligible documentation claimed "only" to be used for HDR+ camera algorithm processing. Google has had a history of lying with things like the Location History toggle, or their known data collection business and known relationship with NSA.

EVIDENCE RECORD

I have managed to collect and create what is an evidence record establishing the fact that select moderators either have some kind of agenda or are destroying the privacy community as a whole on the internet itself.
The below large part is a direct copy of the "Criticism of..." section in my Threat Model writeup in the sidebar.

OTHER ISSUES, CRITICISM OF MODERATION OF R_PRIVACY

Telling me that I am a burden to the subreddit is outright super offensive, in my most humble opinion. Moreover, they have a strong opinionated bias towards Apple (here too), however no reason to complain for their opinions if they talk outside /privacy and /privacytoolsIO where they moderate. Take the mod hat off if you want. To their credit, one of them did confirm they have a light threat model and primary goal is to thwart mass surveillance, around Level 3 in my book.
You will always be criticised for complaining about US and rationally judging Chinese technology, and effectively repeatedly banned by American moderators and muted from modmail everytime you complain about people personally name calling you "Chinese intelligence proponent" or "Chinese/Huawei plant" or "idiot".
I cannot make text posts anymore in that subreddit as of 11/02/2020.
Lots of evidence events happened followed after my smartphone guide linked above: https://imgur.com/a/TqOkQk6
In atomicratsen image, you can see proof of them allowing Sinophobic propaganda in the name of arguments, followed by the last image. So that is another thing allowed here.
Below comment is the admission of being lazy, incompetent and calling actual gilded contributor users "burden": https://np.reddit.com/privacy/comments/enoui9/5_reasons_not_to_use_whatsapp/fe6qgd7/ Just in case comment goes poof, screenshot.
Moreover, one of them made it clear in modmail that Sinophobic propaganda are "arguments" and will go uncriticised, likely patriotism owing to a global subreddit's moderation which seems unfair and caters not to all but to favouritism to a larger US/West EU audience on reddit, as said earlier:
The thing is, making an argument that China is shady is that: an argument. I mean, geez: Hong Kong. Enough said. So long as they're being civil about it, it's actually what this Sub is for.
Do you mention anything related to China or their products in your post? If so, it's fair game, and we expect everyone to conduct themselves like rational adults.
I'll check out the reports, but if they're conducting themselves along the lines of our sidebar rules, I (obviously) won't be taking any action. But I also hope that you don't get drawn into arguments that might end up earning yourself a time-out. We're somewhat patient, but at the same time, we can't spend too many man-hours tending a particular subscriber too much. Our time is volunteered and there are 600K+ subscribers. It's not fair to them.
Is this all fair to me, a cooperating member? If moderation and volunteering time is such a great issue, it would be a good step to take a backseat and discuss this in a rational non-prejudiced and less authoritarian manner. Why not allow others to take part and aid in moderating that subreddit?
They have repeatedly banned me for nonsensical reasons, standing on last warning, and will likely do so after this post (once for claiming this comment means I called the user asshat instead of their comment, when it never violated /privacy 's rule 5, and another comment where I said to use Win 7/8.1 instead of Win 10, mods claimed it as gatekeeping and banned me for 14 days because I am criticising some things they truly love).
New evidence as of few days ago (Feb 11, 2020): https://i.imgur.com/vOyaidS.png

NEW EVIDENCE

(May 31, 2020)

https://np.reddit.com/privacytoolsIO/comments/gtd3pl/fsb0m7f/ Use removeddit or snew.github.io in case the moderator deletes my comments. The modmail message thread (https://i.imgur.com/JwYaGJU.jpg) and my now shadowbanned comment (https://i.imgur.com/uUrMqyk.png).

NEW EVIDENCE

(June 10, 2020)

The moderator trai_dep now wants a sitewide ban on me for what is informing a reddit user of legitimate logical criticism of GrapheneOS. He calls this harassment, as he has done this multiple times with me in the past (unfortunately for which comments are deleted and evidence not being able to be recorded). However, this is taking it too far. https://i.imgur.com/dX73ZNX.png

NEW EVIDENCE

(June 15, 2020)

trai_dep revengefully deletes my famous gilded smartphone hardening no root guide with 1400+ votes. Modmail proofs post with timestamps: https://old.reddit.com/privatelife/comments/h8hsdh/exclusive_rprivacy_moderator_deleted_smartphone/

SELF TAKE ON THE MATTER

This happened with me on privacy, which is a major why I started this community. There must exist a place free of prejudiced bias and free of any forms of bigotry for privacy, truth and freedom loving folks. The fact that the moderators can get away with it by saying nice words after the ban reeks of a dictator that loves to give speech about care of its citizens, yet will slice anyone up. trai_dep and his friends continue to support the bigotry and these cult armies, which is likely because they do not understand nearly any higher order of technical aspect of privacy threat modelling, and have got no education on the same.

CONCLUSION

Privacy communities on reddit are a huge problem when it comes to dealing with the cult brigading, and instead critics are targeted by the cult armies which are let loose in these very communities. privacy and /privacytoolsIO are not true representatives of communities giving good advice for higher privacy and security, unfortunately ruined both by the moderators (many of whom are iPhone users themselves just like trai_dep) and the cult brigade armies.
submitted by TheAnonymouseJoker to privatelife [link] [comments]

Sobre Tibia, gold farmers y un caso de ayuda y éxito PT2. Son muy buenos consejos de cómo comenzar a programar profesionalmente

Una vez más, reconocimiento al autor original de los post International-Unit-8
Hello,

I have gotten so many replies and messages since my last post in this thread, that I can't answer them all individually. Previous topic:

https://www.reddit.com/TibiaMMO/comments/h8tu5u/a_great_tip_for_brazilians_venezuelans_and_othe

It has been shared on multiple subreddits so I have no idea where to even post this. But I'd like to come up with a follow-up thread with some more information. The internet is the most powerful tool that mankind has ever invented. You have the ability to reach thousands, millions and even billions of people with just a computer and some internet access.

If you're on this subreddit, chances are you're already playing Tibia and you already have a computer and internet access. It doesn't need to be the best internet, but as long as websites will load (eventually) you are good to go.

In this topic I will go more in-depth on web development and software engineering. If you have a very slow internet connection, you may want to look into web development instead of software development. An application/software is much heavier (larger file size) than a website. And most developer jobs require that you send and download files, back and forth, between you and your company's server. So if you feel like your internet is too slow to send a lot of files - do not worry! There are plenty of jobs.

First, I will go through some more details on how to learn web development and software development. After that, I will list a few other kinds of jobs that you can do remotely. These types of jobs can be done from anywhere in the world as long as you have internet access.



Part 1: Some languages you should learn

What is web development? Well, it can be a lot of things. You perhaps make websites for shops/restaurants/hair dressers/dentists, or you work for a big company and work on their web application, like Outlook, Discord or Spotify (which can all be accessed via a browser: their web app). You can also work with design and user experience, instead of programming. Being a web developer can mean so many different things, it's impossible to name them all. But most web developers are just developers: they program. They make websites, and they either sell the websites to companies (as a consultant) or you work full/part-time for a company.

I can not provide in-depth information about every single thing, but I can give you some pointers. The very basics any web developer should know is this:

HTML (HyperText Markup Language) - it's what almost all websites use as a foundation. This is not a programming language, but it is a markup language. If you want to build websites, you pretty much have to know this language. Don't worry though, it is easy. Not so much to learn. You can learn all about it in a few weeks.

CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) - it's what will add colors and shapes to your website. If you want to focus more on design (also known as front end development) then this is where you want to gain a lot of knowledge.

Python - A very simple language to learn. This language is very often the first programming language that developers start using. You can use it for a lot of things. This language is used in the back of a lot of websites. Google has been using Python for years and still is. It's great for web scraping and making web requests. If you want a language to practice your algorithms, then this language is awesome.

PHP - This used to be a very popular language, but not so much these days. However, it is very good to know how this works because it's very simple to learn and also very functional in some cases. If you want to transmit or withdraw information from a database to your website, then this (in combination with SQL) is a great way to do so. Whenever you make a login system or a contact form, the data must be sent somehow to a recipient or a database. PHP will help you do that. It is a server-side language, which means it will run in the back of the website.

SQL - To be able to communicate with databases (for example: save data, update data, or insert data) you can use different languages for that. But SQL is probably the most widely used language for this. It is basically just a bunch of commands that you tell your website or app to do. If you have a web shop for example, you will need a database to store all your product information in. You can for example use MySQL as your database and then use the SQL language to extract data from your database and publish it as a list of products on your website.

JavaScript - Perhaps the most powerful language at the moment. Anyone who is good at JavaScript will be able to learn most other modern programming languages. In recent years, the demand for good JavaScript developers has skyrocketed. It's because more applications are becoming web based, and JavaScript is probably among the most useful languages to use. You can use it for so many things. Previously JavaScript was only being run on the client side of the website (that means in the user's browser). But in recent years, there has been massive development of this language and you are now able to build servers, connect to databases and do very powerful web applications using just this language. A great tutorial for JavaScript was made by Tony Alicea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bv_5Zv5c-Ts This video is "just" 3.5 hours, but it's the intro. There is a much longer version of it, and you can download it for free if you search for it. Just find it as a torrent and watch it. It's probably the best tutorial I have seen for JavaScript.

C# - It's pronounced as "C Sharp". This language has been dominating the software engineering market for decades at this point. Everyone loves it. It's relatively easy to learn and you can build a lot of stuff in C#. It's very much like JavaScript, but focuses more on application development rather than website development. I would however try to avoid learning this language if you have very slow internet, since you will most likely be sending a ton of files back and forth. But if application (computer & phone) is your thing, then this language is great. There are so many tutorials on this, but there is 1 channel on YouTube which teaches a lot of the basics in C# (and many other languages) and that channel is called ProgrammingKnowledge. Sure, his C# videos may be old now but most of it is still relevant and useful. You will learn a lot by watching his videos. It's always good to start from the beginning and then when you're familiar with that, you can learn more about the recent updates in C#. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2A8tcb_YyY&list=PLS1QulWo1RIZrmdggzEKbhnfvCMHtT-sA

Java - This is pretty much 90% identical to C# as I wrote above. Widely used, relatively easy to learn the basics and there's plenty of jobs. If you like making android apps, this language is for you.



Part 2: Technologies and useful tools

To become a web developer you will need a few tools. You need a text editor, a FTP client, a SSH client and some other things. Also a good browser.

Text editor: Visual Studio Code, Atom, Sublime Text, Brackets - There are many different text editors but at the moment, I highly recommend Visual Studio Code. It has so many built-in features it's honestly the only thing you may need.Don't forget to install Notepad++ as well - this very basic editor is so handy when you just quickly need to edit some files.

File archiving: WinRar, 7-Zip - You need some way of archiving projects and send it to your customer or employer. These are basic tools anyone should use. I personally use Winrar.

FTP (File Transfer Protocol): FileZilla - This tool will allow you to connect to your website's file manager and upload your files to it. There are many tools for connecting to an FTP server but this is the most popular one, it's simple and it works great.

VPS (Virtual Private Server): Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud - If you want to practice building web applications or want to host your own website as a fun project, it's great to use a VPS for that. Both Amazon and Google offers 365 days of free VPS usage. All you need is a credit card. However, they will not charge you, as long as you stay below the free tier limit. A VPS is basically a remote computer that you can connect to. I highly recommend that, if you have a slow internet connection. Those VPS-servers (by Amazon and Google) usually have 500mbit/s internet speed, which is faster than most countries in the world. You simply connect to them via Remote Desktop, or by SSH. Depending on what type of server you are using (Windows or Linux).

SSH (Secure Shell): Solar-PuTTY, PuTTY - If you for example have a web server where you store applications and files, a great way to connect to it is by using SSH. PuTTY is pretty much the standard when it comes to SSH clients. But I really love the version created by SolarWinds. When you download that one, do not enter your personal details. Their sales people will call you and haunt you! Haha.

File Searching: Agent Ransack - When you have many files and try to locate a specific document or file, you may want to use something like Agent Ransack. Much faster than the traditional search feature in Windows and it is much more accurate.

IDE / Code Editor: Visual Studio - Great tool to use when you want to create applications in C# for example. Do not confuse this with Visual Studio Code. These are two very different tools. This tool (Visual Studio) is more designed for Windows applications. Not just websites. I only recommend getting it if you plan to make programs for Windows.

Web host & domain: NameCheap, Epik, SiteGround - If you develop websites on your own, or maybe want to create a portfolio website, you will need a domain name and web hosting. I have personally used all of these 3 and they are very cheap. NameCheap has some of the cheapest domains and great web hosting for a low price. Their support is also great. Same with SiteGround. And if you want to buy a domain anonymously (with Bitcoin for example), then you can use Epik. Low prices and great customer service on all these 3 websites.

Web Server: XAMPP, Nginx - If you plan to practice PHP, you will need to have a web server on your local computer. If you have Windows, I would highly recommend installing XAMPP (Apache). It is very easy to use for beginners. If you're on Linux, I would recommend Nginx. Also check our PhpMyAdmin if you want to quickly setup a MySQL database locally.Bonus tip: If you use Visual Studio Code to create websites in HTML, CSS and JavaScript: then install the extension "live server" and you can run your applications on a live server without setting it up yourself. Tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzE0yqwbdgU

Web Browser: Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Edge Insider, Google Chrome - You need one of the latest web browsers to create websites these days. Since I prefer privacy over functionality, I've always loved Firefox. But recently, Microsoft has been improving its new version of Edge a lot (based on Chromium) and it's also very popular. If you want all your personal details to be saved and have good tools for web development, then use Google Chrome. Don't forget to utilize the built-in developer tools. You can access it in any of these browsers by pressing F12.



Other things you may want to look into:

Web services, SSL certificates, Search Engine Optimization, Databases, API, Algorithms, Data Structures



Part 3: Learning platforms

https://www.youtube.com/

https://www.w3schools.com/

https://leetcode.com/

https://stackoverflow.com/



If you want to learn in-depth about algorithms, data structures and more. Then you can take a look at the curriculum of the top-tier universities of USA. Such as: UC Berkeley, Harvard and MIT. These courses are very hard and are specifically for people who want to become experts in software engineering. You can enroll some of them for free, like the one on Harvard. And by having a such diploma (which costs $90 extra) can get you a lot of job opportunities. You can enroll those courses if you want, but it can have a fee. But just take a look at what they are studying and try do their exercises, that is 100% free. Get the knowledge. It's mostly on video too! These course below are the very same courses that many of the engineers at Facebook, Google, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Uber, AirBnb, Twitter, LinkedIn, Microsoft, etc. has taken. It's what majority of people in Silicon Valley studied. And it's among the best classes that you can take. These course are held by some of the world's best professors in IT.



UC Berkeley: CS 61a & CS 61b:

https://inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs61a/fa19/

Video playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_LryzvBxFw&list=PL6BsET-8jgYVAaK0jGVTWr9R5g7kSMQ8i

https://inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs61b/fa19/

Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNBSbBTFx8nFahcQyZOYOgQ



Harvard University: CS50 (free enrollment --- 90$ to get a certificate).

https://online-learning.harvard.edu/course/cs50-introduction-computer-science



MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): 6.006

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-006-introduction-to-algorithms-fall-2011/

Held by Erik Demaine. One of the best - if not THE best - professor at MIT. Just look at this resume. It's almost 50 pages long! https://erikdemaine.org/cv.pdf



Part 4: Finding jobs

https://www.linkedin.com/

https://marketing.hackerrank.com/

https://www.glassdoor.com/index.htm

Facebook groups for web developers, freelancing, remote work, etc.

Portfolio / Code Sharing / Source Control:

https://github.com/



Part 5: Other types of jobs you can work with (remotely) - with/without coding experience

SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

Translations (Spanish/Portuguese, etc.)

Affiliate Marketing (look into Clickbank.com - and use Facebook Ads to promote products)

Design (web design, photo design, etc.)

Copywriting (write sales letters for companies)

Database manager (monitor and administrate a company's database)

YouTube - make YouTube videos to gain views. Views = Money.

Dropshipping (use Shopify.com for example) and sell products in a webshop. Benefit with dropshipping is that you don't personally store the products.

Customer support

more...? Banking, economics, etc.



You can find information about all of the things I have mentioned by using YouTube or Google search.

Hope it helps.



And I hope that in 1 year, there will be at least some new web developers in Brazil, Venezuela and other countries in South America.
submitted by jesuskater to memezuela [link] [comments]

Start learning programming " Here is the best Platforms for you"

Step by step Help for you:
Platforms Node.js Frontend Development iOS Android IoT & Hybrid Apps Electron Cordova React Native Xamarin Linux ContainersOS X Command-Line ScreensaverswatchOS JVM Salesforce Amazon Web Services Windows IPFS Fuse HerokuProgramming Languages JavaScript Promises Standard Style Must Watch Talks Tips Network Layer Micro npm Packages Mad Science npm Packages Maintenance Modules - For npm packages npmAVA - Test runner ESLintSwift Education PlaygroundsPython Rust Haskell PureScript Go Scala Ruby EventsClojure ClojureScript Elixir Elm Erlang Julia Lua C C/C++ R D Common Lisp Perl Groovy Dart JavaRxJava Kotlin OCaml Coldfusion Fortran .NET PHP Delphi Assembler AutoHotkey AutoIt Crystal TypeScriptFront-end Development ES6 Tools Web Performance Optimization Web Tools CSS Critical-Path Tools Scalability Must-Watch Talks ProtipsReact RelayWeb Components Polymer Angular 2 Angular Backbone HTML5 SVG Canvas KnockoutJS Dojo Toolkit Inspiration Ember Android UI iOS UI Meteor BEM Flexbox Web Typography Web Accessibility Material Design D3 Emails jQuery TipsWeb Audio Offline-First Static Website Services A-Frame VR - Virtual reality Cycle.js Text Editing Motion UI Design Vue.js Marionette.js Aurelia Charting Ionic Framework 2 Chrome DevToolsBack-end Development Django Flask Docker Vagrant Pyramid Play1 Framework CakePHP Symfony EducationLaravel EducationRails GemsPhalcon Useful .htaccess Snippets nginx Dropwizard Kubernetes LumenComputer Science University Courses Data Science Machine Learning TutorialsSpeech and Natural Language Processing SpanishLinguistics Cryptography Computer Vision Deep Learning - Neural networks TensorFlowDeep Vision Open Source Society University Functional Programming Static Analysis & Code Quality Software-Defined NetworkingBig Data Big Data Public Datasets Hadoop Data Engineering StreamingTheory Papers We Love Talks Algorithms Algorithm Visualizations Artificial Intelligence Search Engine Optimization Competitive Programming MathBooks Free Programming Books Free Software Testing Books Go Books R Books Mind Expanding Books Book AuthoringEditors Sublime Text Vim Emacs Atom Visual Studio CodeGaming Game Development Game Talks Godot - Game engine Open Source Games Unity - Game engine Chess LÖVE - Game engine PICO-8 - Fantasy consoleDevelopment Environment Quick Look Plugins - OS X Dev Env Dotfiles Shell Command-Line Apps ZSH Plugins GitHub Browser Extensions Cheat SheetGit Cheat Sheet & Git Flow Git Tips Git Add-ons SSH FOSS for DevelopersEntertainment Podcasts Email NewslettersDatabases Database MySQL SQLAlchemy InfluxDB Neo4j Doctrine - PHP ORM MongoDBMedia Creative Commons Media Fonts Codeface - Text editor fonts Stock Resources GIF Music Open Source Documents Audio VisualizationLearn CLI Workshoppers - Interactive tutorials Learn to Program Speaking Tech Videos Dive into Machine Learning Computer HistorySecurity Application Security Security CTF - Capture The Flag Malware Analysis Android Security Hacking Honeypots Incident ResponseContent Management System Umbraco Refinery CMSMiscellaneous JSON Discounts for Student Developers Slack CommunitiesConferences GeoJSON Sysadmin Radio Awesome Analytics Open Companies REST Selenium Endangered Languages Continuous Delivery Services Engineering Free for Developers Bitcoin Answers - Stack Overflow, Quora, etc Sketch - OS X design app Places to Post Your Startup PCAPTools Remote Jobs Boilerplate Projects Readme Tools Styleguides Design and Development Guides Software Engineering Blogs Self Hosted FOSS Production Apps Gulp AMA - Ask Me Anything AnswersOpen Source Photography OpenGL Productivity GraphQL Transit Research Tools Niche Job Boards Data Visualization Social Media Share Links JSON Datasets Microservices Unicode Code Points Internet of Things Beginner-Friendly Projects Bluetooth Beacons Programming Interviews Ripple - Open source distributed settlement network Katas Tools for Activism TAP - Test Anything Protocol Robotics MQTT - "Internet of Things" connectivity protocol Hacking Spots For Girls Vorpal - Node.js CLI framework OKR Methodology - Goal setting & communication best practices Vulkan LaTeX - Typesetting language Network Analysis Economics - An economist's starter kit
Few more resources:
submitted by Programming-Help to Programming_Languages [link] [comments]

Questions about Bitcoin reorganization process logic with a rev*.dat file format or byte map.

Hi, I’m currently learning how bitcoin operates by studying the BitcoinCore code and several other bitcoin projects, most of them parsers, and came to a topic of blockchain data storage of blk*.dat and rev*.dat.
While blk*.dat format is more or less documented and the process is described really good (https://learnmeabitcoin.com/guide/blkdat) most of the resources are lacking detailed descriptions of rev*.dat file format and how the process of handling blockchain reorganization (block undo) works. Some Parsers (https://github.com/citp/BlockSci) have rules not to parse new blocks before a certain amount of confirmations so they do not need to deal with the issues of reorganization.
Right now I’m very interested in the logic of blockchain reorganization and found some descriptions:https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Bitcoin_Core_0.11_(ch_2):_Data_Storage#Raw_undo_data_.28rev.2A.dat.29:Data_Storage#Raw_undo_data.28rev.2A.dat.29) And an awesome post reply by Pieter Wuille: https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/57978/file-format-rev-dat I even tried to visualize that answer in a picture: https://prnt.sc/s4ile4
The problem is that all those explanations are dated because of the update (https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/10195) that replaced CTxInUndo class with Coin class (https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/commit/cb2c7fdac2dc74368ed24ae4717ed72178956b92 )
I know that code is the best documentation, but I still find it hard to read and understand, so I’m asking for help to answer these questions:
Apart from learning how everything works, I’m also interested in these topics because they say that it’s possible to get blockstasts faster using rev*.dat files (https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/14802) and I want to properly picture the whole processes with the rev*.dat files.
submitted by cyberwarboy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Questions about Bitcoin reorganization process logic with a rev*.dat file format or byte map.

Hi, I’m currently learning how bitcoin operates by studying the BitcoinCore code and several other bitcoin projects, most of them parsers, and came to a topic of blockchain data storage of blk*.dat and rev*.dat.
While blk*.dat format is more or less documented and the process is described really good (https://learnmeabitcoin.com/guide/blkdat) most of the resources are lacking detailed descriptions of rev*.dat file format and how the process of handling blockchain reorganization (block undo) works. Some Parsers (https://github.com/citp/BlockSci) have rules not to parse new blocks before a certain amount of confirmations so they do not need to deal with the issues of reorganization.
Right now I’m very interested in the logic of blockchain reorganization and found some descriptions:https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Bitcoin_Core_0.11_(ch_2):_Data_Storage#Raw_undo_data_.28rev.2A.dat.29:Data_Storage#Raw_undo_data.28rev.2A.dat.29) And an awesome post reply by Pieter Wuille: https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/57978/file-format-rev-dat I even tried to visualize that answer in a picture: https://prnt.sc/s4ile4
The problem is that all those explanations are dated because of the update (https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/10195) that replaced CTxInUndo class with Coin class (https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/commit/cb2c7fdac2dc74368ed24ae4717ed72178956b92 )
I know that code is the best documentation, but I still find it hard to read and understand, so I’m asking for help to answer these questions:
Apart from learning how everything works, I’m also interested in these topics because they say that it’s possible to get blockstasts faster using rev*.dat files (https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/14802) and I want to properly picture the whole processes with the rev*.dat files.
submitted by cyberwarboy to BitcoinTechnology [link] [comments]

⟳ 870 apps added, 78 updated at f-droid.org

Notice: this update is spurious, and the issue is being looked at.
⟳ f-droid.org from Wed, 26 Feb 2020 20:21:50 GMT updated on Sun, 01 Mar 2020 05:23:29 GMT contains 2962 apps.
Added (870)
Updated (78)
2020-03-01T05:53:18Z
submitted by BrainstormBot to FDroidUpdates [link] [comments]

Indian scientist applied deep learning technology to predict crypto asset prices

Indian scientist applied deep learning technology to predict crypto asset prices

https://preview.redd.it/oktnod9e6e241.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=ee6deeef9cc06dcb25bbd76ac0dd14baaaa1913f
A researcher at the Vellore Institute of Technology in India has proposed a method for predicting crypto asset prices using a long short-term memory (LSTM) neural network.
Data processing and analysis specialist Abinhav Sagar demonstrated in his blog a four-step process of using machine learning technology to predict the prices of crypto assets in real time, which are "relatively unpredictable" compared to traditional markets.
According to Sagar, although machine learning has achieved some success in predicting stock market prices, its application in the cryptocurrency industry has been limited. In confirmation, he stated that the prices of crypto assets fluctuate due to the rapid development of technology, as well as economic and political factors and security issues.
Sagar's proposed four-step method includes:
1.the collection of data about bitcoin in real time;
2.data preparation for neural network training;
3.prediction testing using lstm neural network;
4.the visualization of the prediction results.
To train the network, Sagar used a dataset from CryptoCompare, taking into account price, trading volume, highest and lowest price value.
He posted information about the project on GitHub and described the features he used to normalize data values in preparation for machine learning. Before charting and visualizing the results of the network forecasts, Sagar noted that he used the absolute error of the mean as an estimation measure, which measures the average of errors in a set of forecasts without regard to their direction.
#AI #forecasting #India #rate #altcoins #bitcoin #Analytics
submitted by QBEXCHANE to u/QBEXCHANE [link] [comments]

25 Tools and Resources for Crypto Investors: Guide to how to create a winning strategy

Lots of people have PM'd me asking me the same questions on where to find information and how to put together their portfolio so I decided to put a guide for crypto investors, especially those who have only been in a few months and are still confused.
This is going to be Part 1 and will deal with research resources, risk and returns. In Part 2 I'll post a systematic approach to valuation and picking individual assets with derived price targets.

Getting started: Tools and resources

You don't have to be a programmer or techie to invest in crypto, but you should first learn the basics of how it functions. I find that this video by 3Blue1Brown is the best introduction to what a blockchain actually is and how it functions, because it explains it clearly and simply with visuals while not dumbing it down too much. If you want a more ELI5 version with cute cartoons, then Upfolio has a nice beginner's intro to the blockchain concept and quick descriptions of top 100 cryptocurrencies. I also recommend simply going to Wikipedia and reading the blockchain and cryptocurrency page and clicking onto a few links in, read about POS vs POW...etc. Later on you'll need this information to understand why a specific use case may or may not benefit from a blockchain structure. Here is a quick summary of the common terms you should know.
Next you should arm yourself with some informational resources. I compiled a convenient list of useful tools and sites that I've used and find to be worthy of bookmarking:
Market information
Analysis tools
Portfolio Tracking
Youtube
I generally don't follow much on Youtube because it's dominated by idiocy like Trevon James and CryptoNick, but there are some that I think are worthy of following:

Constructing a Investment Strategy

I can't stress enough how important it is to construct an actual investment strategy. Organize what your goals are, what your risk tolerance is and how you plan to construct a portfolio to achieve those goals rather than just chasing the flavor of the week.
Why? Because it will force you to slow down and make decisions based on rational thinking rather than emotion, and will also inevitably lead you to think long term.

Setting ROI targets

Bluntly put, a lot of young investors who are in crypto have really unrealistic expectations about returns and risk.
A lot of them have never invested in any other type of financial asset, and hence many seem to consider a 10% ROI in a month to be unexciting, even though that is roughly what they should be aiming for.
I see a ton of people now on this sub and on other sites making their decisions with the expectation to double their money every month. This has lead a worrying amount of newbies putting in way too much money way too quickly into anything on the front page of CoinMarketCap with a low dollar value per coin hoping that crypto get them out of their debt or a life of drudgery in a cubicle. And all in the next year or two!
But its important to temper your hype about returns and realize why we had this exponential growth in the last year. Its not because we are seeing any mass increase in adoption, if anything adoption among eCommerce sites is decreasing. The only reason we saw so much upward price action is because of fiat monetary base expansion from people FOMO-ing in due to media coverage of previous price action. People are hoping to ride the bubble and sell to a greater fool in a few months, it is classic Greater Fool Theory. That's it. We passed the $1,000 psychological marker again for Bitcoin which we hadn't seen since right before the Mt.Gox disaster, and it just snowballed the positivity as headline after headline came out about the price growth. However those unexciting returns of 10% a month are not only the norm, but much more healthy for an alternative investment class. Here are the annual returns for Bitcoin for the last few years:
Year BTC Return
2017 1,300%
2016 120%
2015 35%
2014 -60%
2013 5300%
2012 150 %
Keep in mind that a 10% monthly increase when compounded equals a 313% annual return, or over 3x your money. That may not sound exciting to those who entered recently and saw their money go 20x in a month on something like Tron before it crashed back down, but that 3X annual return is better than Bitcoin's return every year except the year right before the last market meltdown and 2017. I have been saying for a while now that we are due for a major correction and every investor now should be planning for that possibility through proper allocation and setting return expectations that are reasonable.

Risk Management

Quanitifying risk in crypto is surprisingly difficult because the historical returns aren't normally distributed, meaning that tools like Sharpe Ratio and other risk metrics can't really be used as intended. Instead you'll have to think of your own risk tolerance and qualitatively evaluate how risky each crypto is based on the team, the use case prospects, the amount of competition and the general market risk.
You can think of each crypto having a risk factor that is the summation of the general crypto market risk (Rm) as ultimately everything is tied to how Bitcoin does, but also its own inherent risk specific to its own goals (Ri).
Rt = Rm +Ri
The market risk is something you cannot avoid, if some China FUD comes out about regulations on Bitcoin then your investment in solid altcoin picks will go down too along with Bitcoin. This (Rm) return is essentially what risk you undertake to have a market ROI of 385% I talked about above. What you can minimize though is the Ri, the aset specific risks with the team, the likelihood they will actually deliver, the likelihood that their solution will be adopted. Unfortunately there is no one way to do this, you simply have to take the time to research and form your own opinion on how risky it really is before allocating a certain percentage to it. Consider the individual risk of each crypto and start looking for red flags:
  • guaranteed promises of large returns (protip: that's a Ponzi)
  • float allocations that give way too much to the founder
  • vague whitepapers
  • vague timelines
  • no clear use case
  • Github with no useful code and sparse activity
  • a team that is difficult to find information on or even worse anonymous
While all cryptocurrencies are a risky investments but generally you can break down cryptos into "low" risk core, medium risk speculative and high risk speculative
  • Low Risk Core - This is the exchange pairing cryptos and those that are well established. These are almost sure to be around in 5 years, and will recover after any bear market. Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ethereum are in this class of risk, and I would also argue Monero.
  • Medium Risk Speculative - These would be cryptos which generally have at least some product and are reasonably established, but higher risk than Core. Things like ZCash, Ripple, NEO..etc.
  • High Risk Speculative - This is anything created within the last few months, low caps, shillcoins, ICOs...etc. Most cryptos are in this category, most of them will be essentially worthless in 5 years.
How much risk should you take on? That depends on your own life situation but also it should be proportional to how much expertise you have in both financial analysis and technology. If you're a newbie who doesn't understand the tech and has no idea how to value assets, your risk tolerance should be lower than a programmer who understand the tech or a financial analyst who is experienced in valuation metrics.
Right now the trio of BTC-ETH-LTC account for 55% of the market cap, so between 50-70% of your portfolio in low Risk Core for newbies is a great starting point. Then you can go down to 25-30% as you gain confidence and experience. But always try to keep about 1/3rd in safe core positions. Don't go all in on speculative picks.
Core principles to minimize risk
  • Have the majority of your holdings in things you feel good holding for at least 2 years. Don't use the majority of your investment for day trading or short term investing.
  • Consider using dollar cost averaging to enter a position. This generally means investing a X amount over several periods, instead of at once. You can also use downward biased dollar cost averaging to mitigate against downward risk. For example instead of investing $1000 at once in a position at market price, you can buy $500 at the market price today then set several limit orders at slightly lower intervals (for example $250 at 5% lower than market price, $250 at 10% lower than market price). This way your average cost of acquisition will be lower if the crypto happens to decline over the short term.
  • Never chase a pump. Its simply too risky as its such an inefficient and unregulated market. If you continue to do it, most of your money losing decisions will be because you emotionally FOMO-ed into gambling on a symbol.
  • Invest what you can afford to lose. Don't have more than 5-10% of your net worth in crypto.
  • Consider what level of loss you can't accept in a position with a high risk factor, and use stop-limit orders to hedge against sudden crashes. Set you stop price at about 5-10% above your lowest limit. Stop-limit orders aren't perfect but they're better than having no hedging strategy for a risky microcap in case of some meltdown. Only you can determine what bags you are unwilling to hold.
  • Diversify across sectors and rebalance your allocations periodically. Keep about 1/3rd in low risk core holdings.
  • Have some fiat in reserve at a FDIC-insured exchange (ex. Gemini), and be ready to add to your winning positions on a pullback.
  • Remember you didn't actually make any money until you take some profits, so take do some profits when everyone else is at peak FOMO-ing bubble mode. You will also sleep much more comfortably once you take out the equivalent of your principal.

Portfolio Allocation

Along with thinking about your portfolio in terms of risk categories described above, I really find it helpful to think about the segments you are in. OnChainFX has some segment categorization to think about:
  • Currency
  • General Purpose Platform
  • Advertising
  • Crowdfunding Platform
  • Lending Platform
  • Privacy
  • Distributed Computing/Storage
  • Prediction Markets
  • IOT (Internet of Things)
  • Asset Management
  • Content Creation
  • Exchange Platform
I generally like to simplify these down to these 7 segments:
  • Core holdings - essentially the Low Risk Core segment
  • Platform segment
  • Privacy segment
  • Finance/Bank settlement segment
  • Enterprise Blockchain solutions segment
  • Promising/Innovative Tech segment
This is merely what I use, but I'm sure you can think of your own. The key point I have is to try to invest your medium and high risk picks in a segment you understand well, and in which you can relatively accurately judge risk. If you don't understand anything about how banking works or SWIFT or international settlement layers, don't invest in Stellar. If you have no idea how a supply chain functions, avoid investing in VeChain (even if it's being shilled to death on Reddit at the moment just like XRB was last month). Buffet calls this "circle of competence", he invests in sectors he understands and avoids those he doesn't like tech. I think doing the same thing in crypto is a wise move.
What's interesting is that often we see like-coin movement, for example when a coin from one segment pumps we will frequently see another similar coin in the same segment go up (think Stellar following after Ripple).
Consider the historic correlations between your holdings. Generally when Bitcoin pumps, altcoins dump but at what rate depends on the coin. When Bitcoin goes sideways we tend to see pumping in altcoins, while when Bitcoin goes down, everything goes down.
You should set price targets for each of your holdings, which is a whole separate discussion I'll go in Part 2 of the guide.

Summing it up

This was meant to get you think about what return targets you should set for your portfolio and how much risk you are willing to take and what strategies you can follow to mitigate that risk.
Returns around 385% (average crypto market CAGR over the last 3 years) would be a good target to aim for while remaining realistic, you can tweak it a bit based on your own risk tolerance. What category of risk your individual crypto picks should be will be determined by how much more greed you have for above average market return. A portfolio of 50% core holdings, 30% medium risk in a sector you understand well and 20% in high risk speculative is probably what the average portfolio should look like, with newbies going more towards 70% core and only 5% high risk speculative.
Just by thinking about these things you'll likely do better than most crypto investors, because most don't think about this stuff, to their own detriment.
submitted by arsonbunny to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Crypto Investing Guide: Useful resources and tools, and how to create an investment strategy

Lots of people have PM'd me asking me the same questions on where to find information and how to put together their portfolio so I decided to put a guide for crypto investors, especially those who have only been in a few months and are still confused.
Many people entered recently at a time when the market was rewarding the very worst type of investment behavior. Unfortunately there aren't many guides and a lot of people end up looking at things like Twitter or the trending Youtube crypto videos, which is dominated by "How to make $1,00,000 by daytrading crypto" and influencers like CryptoNick.
So I'll try to put together a guide from what I've learned and some tips, on how to invest in this asset class. This is going to be Part 1, in another post later I'll post a systematic approach to valuation and picking individual assets.

Getting started: Tools and resources

You don't have to be a programmer or techie to invest in crypto, but you should first learn the basics of how it functions. I find that this video by 3Blue1Brown is the best introduction to what a blockchain actually is and how it functions, because it explains it clearly and simply with visuals while not dumbing it down too much. If you want a more ELI5 version with cute cartoons, then Upfolio has a nice beginner's intro to the blockchain concept and quick descriptions of top 100 cryptocurrencies. I also recommend simply going to Wikipedia and reading the blockchain and cryptocurrency page and clicking onto a few links in, read about POS vs POW...etc. Later on you'll need this information to understand why a specific use case may or may not benefit from a blockchain structure. Here is a quick summary of the common terms you should know.
Next you should arm yourself with some informational resources. I compiled a convenient list of useful tools and sites that I've used and find to be worthy of bookmarking:
Market information
Analysis tools
Portfolio Tracking
Youtube
I generally don't follow much on Youtube because it's dominated by idiocy like Trevon James and CryptoNick, but there are some that I think are worthy of following:

Constructing a Investment Strategy

I can't stress enough how important it is to construct an actual investment strategy. Organize what your goals are, what your risk tolerance is and how you plan to construct a portfolio to achieve those goals rather than just chasing the flavor of the week.
Why? Because it will force you to slow down and make decisions based on rational thinking rather than emotion, and will also inevitably lead you to think long term.

Setting ROI targets

Bluntly put, a lot of young investors who are in crypto have really unrealistic expectations about returns and risk.
A lot of them have never invested in any other type of financial asset, and hence many seem to consider a 10% ROI in a month to be unexciting, even though that is roughly what they should be aiming for.
I see a ton of people now on this sub and on other sites making their decisions with the expectation to double their money every month. This has lead a worrying amount of newbies putting in way too much money way too quickly into anything on the front page of CoinMarketCap with a low dollar value per coin hoping that crypto get them out of their debt or a life of drudgery in a cubicle. And all in the next year or two!
But its important to temper your hype about returns and realize why we had this exponential growth in the last year. The only reason we saw so much upward price action is because of fiat monetary base expansion from people FOMO-ing in due to media coverage. People are hoping to ride the bubble and sell to a greater fool in a few months, it is classic Greater Fool Theory. That's it. Its not because we are seeing any mass increase in adoption or actual widespread utility with cryptocurrency. We passed the $1,000 psychological marker again for Bitcoin which we hadn't seen since right before the Mt.Gox disaster, and it just snowballed the positivity as headline after headline came out about the price growth. However those unexciting returns of 10% a month are not only the norm, but much more healthy for an alternative investment class. Here are the annual returns for Bitcoin for the last few years:
Year BTC Return
2017 1,300%
2016 120%
2015 35%
2014 -60%
2013 5300%
2012 150 %
Keep in mind that a 10% monthly increase when compounded equals a 313% annual return, or over 3x your money. That may not sound exciting to those who entered recently and saw their money go 20x in a month on something like Tron before it crashed back down, but that 3X annual return is better than Bitcoin's return every year except the year right before the last market meltdown and 2017. I have been saying for a while now that we are due for a major correction and every investor now should be planning for that possibility through proper allocation and setting return expectations that are reasonable.
How to set a realistic ROI target
How do I set my own personal return target?
Basically I aim to achieve a portfolio return of roughly 385% annually (3.85X increase per year) or about 11.89% monthly return when compounded. How did I come up with that target? I base it on the average compounded annual growth return (CAGR) over the last 3 years on the entire market:
Year Total Crypto Market Cap
Jan 1, 2014: $10.73 billion
Jan 1, 2017: $615 billion
Compounded annual growth return (CAGR): (615/10.73)1/3 = 385%
My personal strategy is to sell my portfolio every December then buy back into the market at around the beginning of February and I intend to hold on average for 3 years, so this works for me but you may choose to do it a different way for your own reasons. I think this is a good average to aim for as a general guideline because it includes both the good years (2017) and the bad (2014). Once you have a target you can construct your risk profile (low risk vs. high risk category coins) in your portfolio. If you want to try for a higher CAGR than about 385% then you will likely need to go into more highly speculative picks. I can't tell you what return target you should set for yourself, but just make sure its not depended on you needing to achieve continual near vertical parabolic price action in small cap shillcoins because that isn't sustainable.
As the recent January dip showed while the core cryptos like Bitcoin and Ethereum would dip an X percentage, the altcoins would often drop double or triple that amount. Its a very fragile market, and the type of dumb behavior that people were engaging in that was profitable in a bull market (chasing pumps, going all in on a microcap shillcoin, having an attention span of a squirrel...etc) will lead to consequences. Just like they jumped on the crypto bandwagon without thinking about risk adjusted returns, they will just as quickly jump on whatever bandwagon will be used to blame for the deflation of the bubble, whether the blame is assigned to Wall Steet and Bitcoin futures or Asians or some government.
Nobody who pumped money into garbage without any use case or utility will accept that they themselves and their own unreasonable expectations for returns were the reason for the gross mispricing of most cryptocurrencies.

Risk Management

Quanitifying risk in crypto is surprisingly difficult because the historical returns aren't normally distributed, meaning that tools like Sharpe Ratio and other risk metrics can't really be used as intended. Instead you'll have to think of your own risk tolerance and qualitatively evaluate how risky each crypto is based on the team, the use case prospects, the amount of competition and the general market risk.
You can think of each crypto having a risk factor that is the summation of the general crypto market risk (Rm) as ultimately everything is tied to how Bitcoin does, but also its own inherent risk specific to its own goals (Ri).
Rt = Rm +Ri
The market risk is something you cannot avoid, if some China FUD comes out about regulations on Bitcoin then your investment in solid altcoin picks will go down too along with Bitcoin. This (Rm) return is essentially what risk you undertake to have a market ROI of 385% I talked about above. What you can minimize though is the Ri, the aset specific risks with the team, the likelihood they will actually deliver, the likelihood that their solution will be adopted. Unfortunately there is no one way to do this, you simply have to take the time to research and form your own opinion on how risky it really is before allocating a certain percentage to it. Consider the individual risk of each crypto and start looking for red flags:
  • guaranteed promises of large returns (protip: that's a Ponzi)
  • float allocations that give way too much to the founder
  • vague whitepapers
  • vague timelines
  • no clear use case
  • Github with no useful code and sparse activity
  • a team that is difficult to find information on or even worse anonymous
While all cryptocurrencies are a risky investments but generally you can break down cryptos into "low" risk core, medium risk speculative and high risk speculative
  • Low Risk Core - This is the exchange pairing cryptos and those that are well established. These are almost sure to be around in 5 years, and will recover after any bear market. Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ethereum are in this class of risk, and I would also argue Monero.
  • Medium Risk Speculative - These would be cryptos which generally have at least some product and are reasonably established, but higher risk than Core. Things like ZCash, Ripple, NEO..etc.
  • High Risk Speculative - This is anything created within the last few months, low caps, shillcoins, ICOs...etc. Most cryptos are in this category, most of them will be essentially worthless in 5 years.
How much risk should you take on? That depends on your own life situation but also it should be proportional to how much expertise you have in both financial analysis and technology. If you're a newbie who doesn't understand the tech and has no idea how to value assets, your risk tolerance should be lower than a programmer who understand the tech or a financial analyst who is experienced in valuation metrics.
Right now the trio of BTC-ETH-LTC account for 55% of the market cap, so between 50-70% of your portfolio in low Risk Core for newbies is a great starting point. Then you can go down to 25-30% as you gain confidence and experience. But always try to keep about 1/3rd in safe core positions. Don't go all in on speculative picks.
Core principles to minimize risk
  • Have the majority of your holdings in things you feel good holding for at least 2 years. Don't use the majority of your investment for day trading or short term investing.
  • Consider using dollar cost averaging to enter a position. This generally means investing a X amount over several periods, instead of at once. You can also use downward biased dollar cost averaging to mitigate against downward risk. For example instead of investing $1000 at once in a position at market price, you can buy $500 at the market price today then set several limit orders at slightly lower intervals (for example $250 at 5% lower than market price, $250 at 10% lower than market price). This way your average cost of acquisition will be lower if the crypto happens to decline over the short term.
  • Never chase a pump. Its simply too risky as its such an inefficient and unregulated market. If you continue to do it, most of your money losing decisions will be because you emotionally FOMO-ed into gambling on a symbol.
  • Invest what you can afford to lose. Don't have more than 5-10% of your net worth in crypto.
  • Consider what level of loss you can't accept in a position with a high risk factor, and use stop-limit orders to hedge against sudden crashes. Set you stop price at about 5-10% above your lowest limit. Stop-limit orders aren't perfect but they're better than having no hedging strategy for a risky microcap in case of some meltdown. Only you can determine what bags you are unwilling to hold.
  • Diversify across sectors and rebalance your allocations periodically. Keep about 1/3rd in low risk core holdings.
  • Have some fiat in reserve at a FDIC-insured exchange (ex. Gemini), and be ready to add to your winning positions on a pullback.
  • Remember you didn't actually make any money until you take some profits, so take do some profits when everyone else is at peak FOMO-ing bubble mode. You will also sleep much more comfortably once you take out the equivalent of your principal.

Portfolio Allocation

Along with thinking about your portfolio in terms of risk categories described above, I really find it helpful to think about the segments you are in. OnChainFX has some segment categorization but I generally like to bring it down to:
  • Core holdings - essentially the Low Risk Core segment
  • Platform segment
  • Privacy segment
  • Finance/Bank settlement segment
  • Enterprise Blockchain solutions segment
  • Promising/Innovative Tech segment
This is merely what I use, but I'm sure you can think of your own. The key point I have is to try to invest your medium and high risk picks in a segment you understand well, and in which you can relatively accurately judge risk. If you don't understand anything about how banking works or SWIFT or international settlement layers, don't invest in Stellar. If you have no idea how a supply chain functions, avoid investing in VeChain (even if it's being shilled to death on Reddit at the moment just like XRB was last month).
What's interesting is that often we see like-coin movement, for example when a coin from one segment pumps we will frequently see another similar coin in the same segment go up (think Stellar following after Ripple).
Consider the historic correlations between your holdings. Generally when Bitcoin pumps, altcoins dump but at what rate depends on the coin. When Bitcoin goes sideways we tend to see pumping in altcoins, while when Bitcoin goes down, everything goes down.
You should set price targets for each of your holdings, which is a whole separate discussion I'll go in Part 2 of the guide.

Summing it up

This was meant to get you think about what return targets you should set for your portfolio and how much risk you are willing to take and what strategies you can follow to mitigate that risk.
Returns around 385% (average crypto market CAGR over the last 3 years) would be a good target to aim for while remaining realistic, you can tweak it a bit based on your own risk tolerance. What category of risk your individual crypto picks should be will be determined by how much more greed you have for above average market return. A portfolio of 50% core holdings, 30% medium risk in a sector you understand well and 20% in high risk speculative is probably what the average portfolio should look like, with newbies going more towards 70% core and only 5% high risk speculative.
Just by thinking about these things you'll likely do better than most crypto investors, because most don't think about this stuff, to their own detriment.
submitted by arsonbunny to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Splunk Lab News and Updates

Hey everyone! I've been hard at work on Splunk Lab these last few months, and I wanted to share what I've done with it.
The first thing is that I baked in several Splunk apps so that they are all available when launching the app! That list includes:

I've also written (or, in one case, re-written) apps using Splunk Lab as a jumping off point. Here's what I have so far:

Finally, I've added a bunch of data sources to Splunk Lab so that you can jump right in and start pulling data down with Syndication Input or REST API Modular Input:
A bunch of the above endpoints are actually built into Splunk Lab, so once it is running, you can go into "Inputs" in Splunk and start pulling data down with just a few clicks.

To get started with Splunk Lab, make sure you have Docker running, and run this on the command line:
bash <(curl -s https://raw.githubusercontent.com/dmuth/splunk-lab/mastego.sh) 

Anything you'd like to see me add to Splunk App? Do let me know what you think in the comments!
-- Doug
submitted by dmuth to Splunk [link] [comments]

Kin Community FAQ, Guidelines, & Ecosystem Directory

Kin Community FAQ, Guidelines, & Ecosystem Directory
Kin FAQ
  1. What is Kin?
  2. Where can I earn & spend Kin?
  3. Where can I buy Kin?
  4. Where can I store Kin?
  5. Why is the total supply so large?
  6. Why isn't Kin on [xyz] exchange? When will it be?
  7. Is there any update on [Y] announcement? Can you speak on [insert rumor here]? When will we be able to do [Z]?
  8. How can I contact the developers / support staff of [insert app name here]?
  9. How can I contact the Kin Foundation?
  10. How can I track transactions on the Kin blockchain?
  11. I still have ERC-20 based Kin (on the Ethereum blockchain), how can I migrate?
  12. I heard the SEC is suing Kik, is that true? What does it mean for Kin?
  13. How was Kin distributed at launch and how does it enter circulation?
  14. I want to integrate Kin into my software project. How do I get started? Where is the developer community?
  15. How can I keep up with the latest developments in Kin?
1 - What is Kin?
Kin is money for the digital world. It can be earned and spent across an entire ecosystem of applications, thanks to the blockchain. If you don’t know what that means, don’t worry; you don’t have to. Kin is designed to be accessible by a broad mainstream audience- computer science degree not required. By bringing together developers and users of all kinds to build in a shared new digital economy, we can create a more fair playing field; one in which the developers and content creators that build these virtual realities are rewarded based on their contributions, not harvested for their personal data and attention against their will. If you’d like to learn more about Kin, here are some resources to get you started:
· Kin Website: https://www.kin.org/
· Kin Whitepaper: https://www.kin.org/static/files/Kin_Whitepaper_V1_English.pdf
· The Vision for Kin: https://medium.com/kinblog/the-vision-for-kin-6ee048a3a979
· Announcement of Kin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5le2n230oTk
· Introduction to Kin (by u/kyzermf): https://medium.com/hackernoon/introduction-to-kin-universal-virtual-currency-for-apps-ea6464225ffc
2 - Where can I earn & spend Kin?
Kin is going live in a growing number of apps. To see which ones, you can check out the Ecosystem Directory below, or keep up with some of these resources:
· via Kin Website: https://www.kin.org/kin-apps/
· Apps with Kin (by u/Neliss31) https://appswithkin.com/index.php
· Kin Appz (by u/hepays) https://www.kinappz.com/
3 - Where can I buy Kin?
In addition to the ecosystem of apps available to earn Kin, you can also purchase it in larger amounts. It is currently available for purchase on cryptocurrency exchanges listed here:
· CoinMarketCap Exchanges List for Kin https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/kin/#markets
Note that these are independent organizations and therefore only they can provide guarantees on customer service and experience, please do your due diligence in navigating and utilizing these exchanges. Also note that cryptocurrencies are inherently volatile, trade at your own risk. Kin is money for the digital world, not a stablecoin.
4 - Where can I store Kin?
While using Kin inside of apps, make sure to create a backup of your wallet when possible. It is not recommended that you store large amounts of Kin in your user wallets, and instead seek out a more robust solution. There are lots of subtle differences to the kinds of wallets and how to use them, including trade-offs in security vs convenience. Make sure to do your research and be careful when handling your hard-earned Kin:
Offline (“Cold”) Storage:
· My Kin Wallet https://www.mykinwallet.org/
· Guide: Creating A Paper Wallet for Storing Your Kin Safely Offline (by u/TheRealChaseEB) https://www.reddit.com/KinFoundation/comments/bylk0creating_a_paper_wallet_for_storing_your_kin/
Hardware Wallets:
· Ledger Hardware Wallets (works with My Kin Wallet) https://www.ledger.com/
Software Wallets:
· Trust Wallet (Mobile) https://trustwallet.com/
· Atomic Wallet (Mobile & Desktop) https://atomicwallet.io/
· Guarda Wallet (Mobile & Desktop) https://guarda.co/
· Magnum Wallet (Web) https://magnumwallet.co/
5 - Why is the total supply so large?
Kin is meant to be transacted by a large number of users in manageable denominations, just like physical money.
6 - Why isn’t Kin on [xyz] exchange? When will it be?
A healthy market for developers and users is essential to all stakeholders who want to build a vibrant economy around Kin as a currency. That said, a number of blockers have prevented further listings from happening; for example we needed to first have a unified & functional product and underlying technology before pursuing secondary markets. In addition to this there has been regulatory uncertainty surrounding the listing of digital assets in the United States including Kin specifically, especially since the filing of a misleading legal complaint by the US SEC. Due to this, the Kin Foundation is pressing on in other markets on behalf of the ecosystem to try and facilitate more platforms for everyone to buy & use Kin in their different ways. We do not know when Kin will be listed on exchanges, and anyone who does cannot say due to legal and security agreements.
7 - Is there any update on [Y] announcement? Can you speak on [insert rumor here]? When will we be able to do [Z]?
While we believe in maintaining the utmost transparency wherever possible, we will typically announce things as they are ready and report on progress as it becomes pertinent, as to not create unfounded hype and adhere to internal strategies. While it might be tempting to seek constant updates, please remember that answering questions takes time, and everyone is busy working hard to actually build the things we are all excited to see. We will do our best to keep everyone updated on the things they care about. We do not comment on rumors and we may be constricted in our ability to communicate at any given moment on ongoing internal affairs that may fall within certain legal or strategic confines.
8 - How can I contact the developers / support of [insert app name here]?
Please refer to the Kin Ecosystem directory below.
9 - How can I contact the Kin Foundation?
You can email us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) , or if you’d like to DM a specific representative or discuss something in an open setting you can also reach out to us and the community here.
Here are some relevant contacts that represent Kin Foundation,Kin Tel Aviv, & Kin San Francisco in the community:
Community u/benji5656
Communications u/kevin_from_kin
Developer Experience (Kin.org, Kin SDK, and Kin Developer Program) u/therealchaseeb
Blockchain (Core infrastructure of the Kin Blockchain) u/gadi_sr
Ecosystem (High touch integrations with mature developers) u/rinatbogin
KRE (The incentive protocol that drives the growth of the ecosystem) u/oradwe
UX Research u/YonatanDub
Kin San Francisco u/matty_hibs
10 - How can I track transactions on the Kin blockchain?
Here are some resources for monitoring the blockchain:
· via Kin Website https://www.kin.org/blockchainExplorer
· Kin Explorer (by u/Chancity) https://v2.kinexplorer.com/explorer
· Kin Bubbles (by u/kidwonder) https://kin-bubbles.herokuapp.com/
· Kin Transaction Visualizer (by u/sednax) http://bitcoin.interaqt.nl/kin.html
11 - I still have ERC-20 based Kin (on the Ethereum blockchain), how can I migrate?
Follow the directions laid out here: https://www.kin.org/migration/
12 - I heard the SEC is suing Kik, is that true? What does it mean for the Kin Foundation?
It’s true. After cooperating with an investigation and multiple attempts to reach an amicable settlement, the SEC filed a disparaging and mischaracterized complaint against Kik for not registering the initial sale of Kin as a security offering. Kik is fighting back. They are in a unique position to take on this case, however, unlike the initial Wells Notice, the Kin Ecosystem Foundation is not named in the complaint.
As noted by the Blockchain Association:
When we look at the Kik investigation, we can tell from the Wells Notice that the SEC originally looked at both Kik Interactive and the Kin Foundation. However, when the complaint was issued, it only focused on the offering of Kin in the September 2017 token sale, not Kin in the ecosystem today. The fact that the SEC investigated the Kin Foundation, but decided not to pursue a complaint is good news for developers, platforms, and others in the ecosystem who use these tokens because it separates the question of the token sale from the activities in the ecosystem since then. ("What the SEC-Kik complaint didn’t cover — and why this is good news for the crypto community")
As the legal battle rages on, the foundation will help Kik to amplify their defense as they correct the record publicly; but also focus on the development of the ecosystem which will continue beyond the SEC battle regardless. Expect ongoing updates as the fight continues to unfold publicly.
**Update**: - Kik has put together DefendCrypto, a fund dedicated to legal initiatives that benefit the cryptocurrency industry, so that companies that don't have the same resources can stand up against unfair regulation in fights of their own. Visit DefendCrypto.org to learn more and join the fight to defend innovation and participation in the cryptocurrency industry in the United States.
- Kik Answers SEC Complaint: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kik-answers-sec-complaint-300897681.html?tc=portal_CAP Kik has filed and published a 130 page, paragraph-by-paragraph refutation of the SEC's allegations.
- Additional Resources: Interview w/ Eileen Lyon, General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer at Kik https://medium.com/kinblog/kin-foundation-asks-interview-w-eileen-lyon-general-counsel-and-chief-compliance-officer-at-kik-bbcf3b7a6961
13 - How was Kin distributed at launch and how does it enter circulation?
The Kin Foundation sold 1 trillion (10% of total supply) in a token distribution event in September 2017 that was split between a pre-sale (487.80 billion sold) and a public sale (512.20 billion sold). Half of the tokens sold during the pre-sale (244 billion) are subject to a one-year lock-up period. Kik received 3 trillion tokens (30% of total supply), which vested at a rate of 300 billion tokens quarterly for 10 quarters, and the Kin Foundation received 6 trillion (60% of total supply). The Kin Foundation tokens will be distributed through the Kin Rewards Engine, which divides the allocation between network participants and marketing and operational costs for the Kin Foundation (6 trillion Kin has been split into 4.5 trillion for network participants, and 1.5 trillion for marketing and other operational costs of the Kin foundation). Kin Foundation tokens for network participants are schedule to be distributed to the network at a rate of 20% of the remaining balance per year.
To learn more about and follow along with Kin allocation, check out Kin's page below, which was published in the spirit of transparency and disclosure in collaboration with Messari:
https://messari.io/asset/kin
14 - I want to integrate Kin into my software project. How do I get started? Where is the developer community?
Check out these developer resources!
Website: https://www.kin.org/developers
Documentation: https://docs.kin.org/intro
Android Tutorial Series: https://medium.com/kinblog/kin-android-development-tutorial-part-i-introduction-to-kin-83b21834a27e
Unity Tutorial Series: https://medium.com/kinblog/building-a-kin-powered-app-with-unity-cf8deef56bdb
Developer Communities: Kin Foundation Developer Forums: https://kindevforum.kin.org/ Kin Foundation Developer Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/JavjKSx
Implementing Kin in PHP, Ruby, Javascript, Go, and 51+ Other Languages (by u/sednax): https://medium.com/@luc.hendriks/implement-kin-in-php-javascript-ruby-go-and-51-other-programming-languages-c7ae616de700
15 - How can I keep up with the latest developments in Kin?
Sign up for the Kin Newsletter here: https://ecopartners.kin.org/newsletter_signup
This subreddit also serves as a civil space for community to share and discuss developments.
Forum Rules & Guidelines
Purpose of the Forum
The KinFoundation subreddit is the public square for discussion and collaboration across the Kin ecosystem. It is important that we embrace the potential of the forum and foster a space where developers do not censor themselves, the curious are free to ask questions without shame, and holders are willing to collaborate on initiatives and discuss ongoing developments. For that reason, we have decided to broaden the discussion while also pinpointing fair and transparent moderation guidelines that will allow for a productive and healthy environment. This subreddit exists for the purpose of maintaining insight on what’s happening with the Kin Ecosystem, acting as a social gathering for its many participants, and mobilizing the community for things like collaborative initiatives, product feedback for developers, idea-sharing, and more.
Moderation Principles
· Transparency
All moderation actions should be guided by the principles laid out in this document and in the spirit of creating a productive and healthy environment for discussion & collaboration, although it is also understood to be iterative and subject to change.
· Objectivity
All moderation actions should be guided by a rules & practices-based approach, not one of personal judgment.
· Fairness
All moderation actions should be even-handed and based on agreeable principles that enable free but also fruitful discussion.
Code of Conduct
To participate in the public square, you must adhere to certain rules of conduct, which were created with the maintenance of productivity & civility in mind. Please review & refer to the rules here before and when posting:https://www.reddit.com/KinFoundation/about/rules/
Kin Ecosystem Directory
The Kin Ecosystem is a growing collective of independent teams, all aligned through a common incentive to build a more fair digital world. These teams build the tools, the infrastructure, and the apps that drive the reach and impact of Kin. As we continue to grow as an ecosystem, we want to make sure that the directory is maintained so that it can be a tool for everyone to use and contribute to. If you don’t see your app listed or want something changed, feel free to DM me or post here and tag me so that it can be updated. Some apps may be missing due to incomplete or inaccurate available details.
Organization -- Website -- Support / Contact--
· Bettapoint Website: https://bettapoint.com/ Contact: https://bettapoint.com/contact
· Castle Rush AR Website: https://www.darkvoodoostudios.com/castlerushar.html Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Catpurse Website: https://twitter.com/CatPurse1 Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Find (Find Travelers) Website: https://www.findtravelers.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· FistBump.io Website: https://virtualbotgames.wixsite.com/fistbump Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· imgvue Website: https://imgvue.com/ Contact: Contact Form
· Just Joking Website: https://kinloops.com/ Contact: See Website
· Kard Website: https://kinkard.org/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Kik Website: https://www.kik.com Contact: https://help.kik.com/hc/en-us
· Kimeo Website:https://kimeoapp.com/ Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Kinetik Website:https://www.kinetik.app/ Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])
· KinFit Website:https://www.mykinfit.com/ Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
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submitted by Kevin_from_Kin to KinFoundation [link] [comments]

Gource: Bitcoin - git repo visualization Visualization of Cryptocurrency Transactions - Bitcoin, Ethereum & Bitcoin Cash. History of Ethereum 2013-2018 (Git Visualization) Bitcoin GitHub Source Code Development Visualization ... Bitcoin GitHub History Visualized - Jenkins Palladio

BitCoin Big Bang: Amazing visualization from Elliptic.co https://www.elliptic.co/bigbang-v1.html - bigbang-v1.html Blocks are also represented, and the zoom option allows users to examine even small transactions close up, clicking on them to retrieve their data. bitcoin-vr.github.io – What better way to ... The WebGL globe visualization is also available on Github. 6. Big Bang. This visualization “The Bitcoin Big Bang” by Elliptic is one of the most beautiful visualizations of Bitcoin history at the moment: 7. Blockseer. Blockseer is more of a visual research tool than a creative visualization of the Bitcoin universe. You can visualize ... data.bitcoinity.org – A wealth of information and clean, data-rich charts can be found at data.bitcoinity.org detailing the various bitcoin mining pools and their hashrates. Price info such as ... About: Visualization of bitcoin transactions (unconfirmed ones). Node size scale: LINEAR LOG LEGEND: Green = input, Red = output, Yellow = input+output, Blue = transaction NAVIGATION: mouse + scroll = pan/zoom, SPACE = run/pause TODO: - auto remove transactions older then x min or verified - show transaction details on hover - connect disconect button - listen for a specyfic address and color ...

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Gource: Bitcoin - git repo visualization

Bitcoin Transactions Visualization for ProgressBar at BielaNoc 2016, Bratislava - http://progressbar.sk tx data & organizing ... Wao visuals & audio ... Zden. Bitcoin GitHub History Visualized (Again) January 14, 2015 Coding In My Sleep. Loading... Unsubscribe from Coding In My Sleep? Cancel Unsubscribe. Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 1.37K ... Visualization of Bitcoin protocol contribution from Arp-17 to Aug-19. https://CoinCodeCap.com We track crypto based on their Github activity. Visualization of Cryptocurrency transactions - Bitcoin, Ethereum & Bitcoin Cash. Data taken from TxStreet.com CRYPTO ESSENTIALS ... Alternative Dubstep Version. Updated to March 2014. [v0.9.0rc2] Music: Gimbal & Sinan - Silent Heroes Gimbal & Sinan feat. Larissa - Nothing But Light Record...

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