Bitcoin's Big Problems - Bloomberg - Bitcoin FYI

Bloomberg: Most awkward bitcoin bashing interview I have ever seen - Bitcoin a Ponzi scheme, fraud

Bloomberg: Most awkward bitcoin bashing interview I have ever seen - Bitcoin a Ponzi scheme, fraud submitted by papersheepdog to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] Bitcoin: An asset class that is either a Ponzi scheme or mankind's salvation https://t.co/xfAm96d59t via @BV https://t.co/a212d6IPM1

[Bloomberg Business] Bitcoin: An asset class that is either a Ponzi scheme or mankind's salvation https://t.co/xfAm96d59t via @BV https://t.co/a212d6IPM1 submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

Stablecoins Are Not as Safe as You Think. How Your USDT, PAX, BUSD Get Frozen in a Moment

Stablecoins Are Not as Safe as You Think. How Your USDT, PAX, BUSD Get Frozen in a Moment
Being created on the basis of blockchain, stablecoins were considered to be a safe haven for investors… until recently. Why is their immunity elusive and how does the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) plan to control them?
Established in 1989 by the G7, the FATF inter-governmental organization develops policies to resist money laundering and financing of terrorism. It sets standards and implements legal and regulatory measures to combat illegal financial transactions.
They developed recommendations for the monitoring of money laundering and keep revising them regularly. In case of non-compliance, law enforcement is executed via regional financial organizations. As of 2019, there are 39 full members of FATF, including the USA, UK, Australia, most EU countries, Singapore, India and the Russian Federation.
Since 1st July, the FATF organization has been headed by Marcus Pleyer. During the last FATF meeting, the new president expressed his concerns about global stablecoins and organizations that issue them. Although the organization had already dealt with these cryptocurrencies, it highlighted that, “it is essential to continue closely monitoring the ML/TF risks of so-called stablecoins, including anonymous peer-to-peer transactions via unhosted wallets”.
Is it ever possible to control crypto wallets that are not hosted on online exchanges? – you’d ask. We’re used to the fact that cryptocurrencies are outside the reach of banks and governments. However, when it comes to stablecoins, things are different.

It’s in the code

What makes stablecoins special is that they are pegging to fiat currency, for example, 1 TUSD = $1 USD. This means that such assets should be backed up by real money stored in the bank accounts of the issuing organization. Consequently, stablecoin creators need to comply with the requirements of the SEC, FATF and other controlling agencies, if they are to operate in the cryptocurrency sphere and be authorised to sell stablecoins. Transparent reports are not the only requirement, stablecoins must also provide the possibility of account blocking.
Surprisingly, this feature is implemented in each stablecoin. The experts from QDAO DeFi are covering several stablecoin protocols that enable this function.

OMNI-based USDT

Issued by Tether Limited, USDT is a stablecoin that was originally created to be worth $1 with each token backed by a $1 real fiat reserve. The currency was successfully promoted and added to major cryptocurrency exchanges but stayed a controversial asset. Despite the claims of Tether Limited, they failed to provide any contractual right or other legal claims to guarantee that USDT can be swapped for dollars or be redeemed.
In April 2019, Tether’s lawyers explained that each USDT was backed by only $0.74 in cash or equivalent assets. No audit of dollar collateral was done. A month before that, it changed the backing to include loans to affiliate companies. The scandal also involved the Bitfinex exchange that was accused of using USDT funds to cover $850 million in funds lost since 2018. They were also accused of manipulating USDT to push the BTC price.
Tether is available on five blockchains: Omni, Ehereum, EOS, Tron and Liquid. Only the latter does not have a freezing feature. Omni was the first protocol for USDT. Blocking of users’ accounts is possible, thanks to the following piece of code:

https://preview.redd.it/uqho45l33om51.png?width=690&format=png&auto=webp&s=c0feebdae086b0deeccde05278eaf3cc760f9e2b
Apparently, it’s used to blacklist addresses and contracts.

PAX

The concerns about PAX were centered around the notorious MMM BSC Ponzi scheme. Before the widespread adoption of DeFi services, it was the second-largest gas consumer after Ethereum. Out of 25,000 daily transactions, 5,000 were performed by MMM BSC. It was reported to be a scam but none of the accounts were frozen. Does it mean PAX lacked the resources to regulate illicit activities?
Evidently, not. The protocol code has a LAW ENFORCEMENT FUNCTIONALITY function that allows for the freezing/unfreezing of contracts or burning assets on blacklisted accounts. It turns out, anyone risks having their PAX coins destroyed during an investigation process while their accounts stay blocked.

History of frozen accounts

In 2019, the ZCash Foundation and Eric Wall conducted research on the privacy of stablecoins and revealed several frozen addresses. It’s not clear why exactly they were blocked. Most probably, it happened shortly after the exchange withdrawal – users took this action after witnessing platforms being hacked.

https://preview.redd.it/pkbruqm83om51.png?width=838&format=png&auto=webp&s=b068c5b8c5e5439892eaf5feefa3fbc93c694c8c
USDT was implicated at least twice in scandals to do with freezing. In April 2019, about $850 million in Tether dollars sent by Crypto Capital Corp. were frozen by a New York court. Tether and Btfinex were accused of participating in a cover-up to hide about $850 million worth in clients’ funds. By July 2020, Tether had frozen 40 Ethereum addresses with millions of USDT (some of them are shown in the screenshot above).
The Centre Consortium was the next to follow their lead; about a month ago, it blacklisted an address with USDC worth $100,000. That was done in response to law enforcement.
Yet, it’s not only Europe and the USA imposing control over cryptocurrencies. Since June 2020, the Chinese government managed to block several thousands of users’ bank accounts. It was done to resist illicit activities, especially money laundering. On some of those accounts, no activity had been detected for several months. Meanwhile, prior to April 2020, Chinese residents moved over $50 billion worth of crypto outside the country borders – more than is officially allowed (a maximum of $50,000 per person).
The authorities claim that USDT and other stablecoins are often used in illegal activities. Together with the People’s Bank of China (PBOC), they are developing new ways of investigating digital crimes and money laundering operations involving exchanges and crypto wallets. Local financial bureaus and police are working tight-lipped about investigating startups and crypto exchanges. And they are succeeding at it.
In July 2020, Chinese authorities confiscated BTC, ETH and USDT worth $15 million from people who allegedly ran a fake cryptocurrency scheme.
By the way, not only corporate accounts are being closed. One investor claims his account had been frozen after using yuan to purchase crypto. Also, users who transfer illegally obtained money outside of the mainland in large amounts are under suspicion. Does it mean the Chinese government has started tightening the screws on cryptocurrency users?

DAI, USDT on Liquid and USDQ are the main options for stablecoin deposits

So, where can you store your crypto assets? USDT on Liquid and DAI are not the only solutions available. Consider making a deposit in USDQ, the stablecoin of the QDAO ecosystem. Like other stablecoins, it’s 1-to-1 pegged to USD. However, it cannot be frozen by a government, financial organization or anyone from the QDAO team. You can check it yourself by reading our Smart contract and USDQ Audit.
In QDAO, users’ accounts are never frozen by a single person – all account issues are solved by the entire QDAO community, with the help of a QDAO governance token.
In case of blocking (the chances of which are almost non-existent), you can address the QDAO community and get timely help.

Bottom Line

With FATF taking this new course of action, we might witness serious pressure on stablecoin providers. Some projects will resist it, but it’s still not safe to store your assets in popular stablecoins, especially USDT. Your account can be frozen by authorities for dozens of reasons without the possibility of retrieval.
Yet, there are a number of reliable alternatives and USDQ stablecoin is one of them. QDAO DeFi platform users feel free to manage their crypto reserves and make profitable deposits.
Want to be the first to hear QDAO DeFi news and updates? Visit our website and stay in touch with us on social media: Twitter, Facebook, Telegram and LINE (for the Japanese-speaking community).
submitted by QDAODeFi to u/QDAODeFi [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to conspiracy [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Money [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to economy [link] [comments]

Bitcoin and Meritocratic Capitalism

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Capitalism [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to investing_discussion [link] [comments]

Asia’s Leading Exchanges Team Up Amid Chinese Fcoin Closure

Asia’s Leading Exchanges Team Up Amid Chinese Fcoin Closure

Experts predict further increase in the merge-and-acquisition (M&A) deals in 2020
One of the leading crypto exchanges in South Korea – Bithumb, announced that the company enters into a pivotal cooperation with BitMax, a Singapore-based digital asset trading platform. The joint forces will concentrate on the development of new services and products to expand the global presence for both Bithumb and Bitmax.
The signed on February 17, 2020, Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the two companies comes amid extensive competition in the crypto exchange sector. The main goal of the MoU is to battle the competition with the launch of jointly developed services and products. Bithumb and BitMax would share knowledge and technical expertise in the fields of blockchain and IT infrastructure.
George Cao, CEO of Bitmax, commented on the news about the partnership, stating that “product innovations have always been in the core of our institutional trading platform.”
“We are excited about the new partnership, as now we can combine our know-how and technical infrastructure with Bithumb’s deep understanding of the crypto business. We will work side-by-side to create products and services, operable across the ecosystem of both companies”, Cao added.
BitMax, despite founded in 2018, gathered a strong team of Wall Street veterans, including people with prior experience for Bloomberg, Goldman Sachs, Deutsche Bank, and Gemini. Even Greg Cao is the former CIO of Delpha Capital Management.
Bithumb relies on the expertise level of the people at BitMax to further improve its products. BitMax, on the other hand, is one of the top-10 global market players, based on liquidity. The cooperation would enhance Bithumb’s security, as the exchange suffered from at least three hacks during its lifetime.
The partnership comes amid Chinese crypto exchange FCoin shutting down operations, leaving $125 million worth of cryptocurrencies away from its clients. According to Zhang Jian, the founder of FCoin, the company may not pay its users around 13,000 Bitcoin. Despite Jian reassuring clients that the shutdown of the operation is not an exit scam, crypto experts are on the opposite opinion.
Zhang announced that the shutdown is a consequence of a series of data errors, and that “the problem is hard to explain with plain words.”
FCoin is a rather new exchange – it started operations in May 2019. FCoin quickly became a news sensation, reporting record-breaking trading volumes with its innovative “transaction mining” business model. However, several crypto enthusiasts reported that the trading volumes are not real. Some users even accused FCoin of using bots, which “manipulate” prices.
Signals for fraudulent behavior started from the get-go since FCoin distributed half of its native tokens without airdrops or an ICO campaign. Changpeng Zhao, Binance’s CEO, even called FCoin a Ponzi scheme, stating that “FCoin’s founder apparently found a better invention than Bitcoin. However, the large number of data-derived problems that we noticed, as well as dividend and mining returns, would not result in any good.”
During the shutdown, FCoin utilized its risk-control account, further increasing the speculation about FCoin committing and exit scam scenario. However, Zhang wrote that he, personally, would reply to everyone, seeking to withdraw funds. Zhang even mentioned a compensation mechanism from his other projects, but as of press time, there is no evidence of the existence of such businesses.
submitted by Crypto_Browser to CryptoBrowser_EN [link] [comments]

US Congressman Tom Emmer announced late Friday that he will introduce a trio of cryptocurrency and blockchain related bills as cryptocurrencies fell lower this weekend after posting significant gains last week

Crypto News

Sources:
https://bitcoinist.com/weiss-ratings-bitcoin-lose-ethereum/ https://www.coindesk.com/brazils-largest-independent-broker-is-launching-a-crypto-exchange/ https://www.ccn.com/brazils-biggest-brokerage-processes-bitcoin-trades-govt-supportive/ https://www.coindesk.com/the-latest-bitcoin-bug-was-so-bad-developers-kept-its-full-details-a-secret/ https://www.coindesk.com/when-blockchains-go-down-why-crypto-outages-are-on-the-rise/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/dubai-department-of-finance-launches-blockchain-based-payment-system-for-uae-govt https://bitcoinist.com/dubai-is-building-a-blockchain-powered-government/ https://www.ccn.com/indian-authorities-round-up-on-bitcoin-scammers-properties-worth-60-million/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/icelands-industry-to-shift-from-crypto-mining-to-pure-blockchain-business-insiders-say https://www.coindesk.com/momentum-is-building-to-block-ethereum-asics/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/icelands-industry-to-shift-from-crypto-mining-to-pure-blockchain-business-insiders-say https://www.coindesk.com/us-congressman-drafts-bills-to-aid-blockchain-development/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/opera-launches-beta-labs-version-of-built-in-crypto-wallet-for-desktop-browser https://cointelegraph.com/news/us-congressman-to-introduce-bills-supporting-blockchain-technology-cryptocurrencies
submitted by QuantalyticsResearch to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Clear link between Micheal Patryn and Omar Dhanani

Notice Micheal Patryn and Nazmin Dhanani are listed as officers in the company MPD Advertising: https://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/726420-8/mpd-advertising-inc

Also Intraday56 Explained it well here https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/7nt7ys/question_is_quadrigacx_legit_with_all_the/ds4ihco (copied and pasted for your convenience):
"Michael Patryn is one of the founders of Quadrigacx. He is part of a criminal mafia mob and has been to jail before for carding theft, ID theft and ponzi schemes. His real name is Omar Dhanani. Here's an article from coindesk that names Patryn as the cofounder of QuadrigaCx:
https://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-exchange-quadriga-public-reverse-takeover
Omar Dhanani aka Michael Patryn was one of 6 men arrested for internet ID theft and credit card conspiracy fraud back in 2005. They were operating Shadowcrew.com, a web mob of highly organized criminals. For more info google ShadowCrew.
https://www.justice.gov/archive/opa/p2005/Novembe05_crm_619.html
At the time ShadowCrew was busted by the US Secret Service Omar Dhanani was a resident of Fountain Valley, California. A search on Intelius lists Omar R. Dhanani from Fountain valley, CA along with his relatives, Nazmin Dhanani and Nabatbibi Dhanani.
www.intelius.com/people/Omar-Dhanani/Fountain%20Valley-CA/06DPMG23XKS
Now here is where it gets interesting. Nazmin Dhanini and Michael Patryn have apparently registered several companies together, one of them being MPD Advertising:
http://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/726420-8/mpd-advertising-inc
Omar Dhanini relatives: Nazmin Dhanani and Nabatbibi Dhanani
Michael Patryn: registered at least one company, MPD Advertising Inc with Nazmin Dhanini."

See pastebin below for more info:

"# Michael Patryn

  1. aka. Omar Dhanani
  2. aka. Omar Patryn
  3. ## 2004-10-28
  4. Arrested and convicted in California under the name of Omar Dhanani as a member of Shadowcrew, an organization trafficking stolen credit and identity information primarily using E-Gold
  5. IMPORTANT: Omar Dhanani used the alias Voleur (french for "thief") during his time with Shadowcrew. This is one of the primary connecting threads between the Omar Dhanani and his later aliases as Patryn, owner of VFS-NETWORKS
  6. https://www.justice.gov/archive/opa/p2005/Novembe05\_crm\_619.html
  7. https://web.archive.org/web/20130216063323/http://www.secretservice.gov/press/pub2304.pdf
  8. https://www.justice.gov/sites/default/files/usao-nj/legacy/2013/11/29/Kolarov%2C%20Aleksi%20Indictment.pdf
  9. ### 2004-10-04
  10. According to a Bloomberg article from January 2006 citing a United States Secret Service affidavit, Omar:
  11. "boasted in a chat room that he moved between $40,000 and $100,000 a week. He pled guilty in November to conspiracy to commit fraud and faces up to five years in prison."
  12. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2006-01-08/gold-rush
  13. ## 2004-10-29
  14. Users on Talkgold forum begin discussing the possibility that a prolific user on the forum, "Patryn" is actually Omar Dhanani.
  15. https://web.archive.org/web/20130510055547/http://www.talkgold.com/forum/r256207-.html
  16. ## 2005-11-18
  17. An article in The Register describes how Omar Dahnani and 5 others plead guilty to charges laid on them in November 2014:
  18. "The group of six pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud in New Jersey on Thursday in exchange for the state dropping other charges pending against them, Wired reports. They were named as: Andrew Mantovani, 23, and Brandon Monchamp, 22, of Arizona; Kim Taylor, 47, and Omar Dhanani, 22, of California; Jeremy Stephens, 31, of North Carolina; and Jeremy Zielinski, 22, of Florida. In total, 12 people have now pleaded guilty to Shadowcrew-related charges."
  19. "Shadowcrew members are expected to be sentenced between mid-February and mid-March 2006."
  20. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/11/18/shadowcrew/
  21. ## 2007-05-23
  22. According to US Federal Prison Records, an Omar Dhanani is released from Federal Prison
  23. https://www.bop.gov/inmateloc/
  24. ## 2008-04-03
  25. MIDAS GOLD Exchange is registered in Canada
  26. under the name Omar Patryn
  27. Specialized in processing anonymous purchases and sale of early digital currencies, particularly Liberty Reserve. (Liberty Reserve was shut down in 2013 for money laundering and facilitating identity theft, credit card theft, narcotics trafficking, and child pornography)
  28. https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sccc/CorporationsCanada/fdrlCrpDtls.html?corpId=6951198&V\_TOKEN=1511930988373&crpNm=&crpNmbr=695119-8&bsNmbr=
  29. http://www.hyipforum.pl/topic/779-m-gold-midas-gold-exchange-obni%C5%BCona-prowizja-dla-forumowicz%C3%B3w/
  30. ## 2008-05-30
  31. DNSGEO.COM domain is registered in Panama
  32. This domain was used as an alternative gateway to VFS-NETWORK.COM as seen in the internet archive
  33. https://web.archive.org/web/20110207131437/http://dnsgeo.com/
  34. https://whois.icann.org/en/lookup?name=dnsgeo.com
  35. for comparison:
  36. https://web.archive.org/web/20101218100404/http://vfs-network.com/
  37. ### Reports from users claim that phishing emails we're received from this domain (DNSGEO.COM) shortly after disputing problems with MIDAS GOLD withdrawals and deposits.
  38. Images are included.
  39. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/midas-gold-exchange-c440529.html
  40. ## 2008-08-27
  41. HD-MONEY.COM domain is registered as being located in the Bahamas
  42. https://whois.icann.org/en/lookup?name=www.hd-money.com
  43. ## 2009-02-09
  44. VFS-NETWORK.com domain is registered
  45. (Voleur Financial Services)
  46. https://web.archive.org/web/20090225095825/http://www.vfs-network.com:80/
  47. VFS Network was an exchange network bringing together
  48. e-money services like Liberty Reserve and other OmaMichael projects like HD-MONEY.COM, XXX-CHANGE.COM and MIDAS GOLD.
  49. Website now points to dns.shadowserver.org, a volunteer service often used by legal authorities to capture data from incoming traffic to the webpage (Was used by authorities after Liberty Reserve's domain was seized)
  50. https://whois.icann.org/en/lookup?name=vfs-network.com
  51. https://krebsonsecurity.com/2013/05/reports-liberty-reserve-founder-arrested-site-shuttered/#more-20723
  52. ### 2009-10-02
  53. VFS-Network publishes that they have met with the management of Liberty Reserve
  54. https://web.archive.org/web/20101129134240/http://vfs-network.com/main.htm
  55. ### NOTE: Voleur is mentioned as an alias by users on dreamteammoney.com, along with complaints related to MIDAS GOLD. These complaints relate a MIDAS GOLD policy of withholding client's funds depending on how many emails they sent asking about the status of their funds.
  56. http://www.dreamteammoney.com/index.php?showtopic=130170&hl=voleur
  57. ### IMPORTANT: "OWNER" of VFS-NETWORK frequently appears online under the name of Patryn, connecting the alias to Omar Patryn of MIDAS GOLD, although Patryn can be found denying any relationship whatsoever between the businesses. In the same thread below on ComplaintsBoard, Patryn posts with a VFS-NETWORK avatar while describing why he, as an administrator on a MIDAS GOLD-managed forum deleted posts of users making complaints.
  58. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/midas-gold-exchange-c286802.html#c546412
  59. http://www.realscam.com/members/patryn/
  60. ## 2009-05-02
  61. HD-MONEY.COM CEO (Michael Patryn aka Omar Dhanani) informs clients that they are now partnered with Liberty Reserve
  62. https://web.archive.org/web/20100115074839/http://www.hd-money.com/Usecms.aspx?Page=ceo
  63. ## 2009-09-10
  64. XXX-CHANGE.COM domain is registered (although internet archive shows an xxx-change.com as far back as 2001)
  65. Images from internet archive show an important partnership with HD-MONEY and VFS-NETWORK
  66. https://web.archive.org/web/20130628192252/http://xxx-change.com:80/
  67. ## 2009-10-22
  68. MPD ADVERTISING is founded by Nazin Dhanani and Michael Patryn in Vancouver
  69. Nazin is thought to be a sibling of Omar Dhanani aka Michael Patryn
  70. http://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/726420-8/mpd-advertising-inc
  71. ## 2009-12-25
  72. Complaints surface online about MIDAS GOLD withholding funds with recommendations to report to the Canadian police
  73. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/perfect-money-corporation-c287831.html#c546416
  74. ## 2009-12-30
  75. MIDAS GOLD business registration is dissolved by Omar Patryn, but forums show that services continued well into 2011
  76. https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sccc/CorporationsCanada/fdrlCrpDtls.html?corpId=6951198&V\_TOKEN=1511930988373&crpNm=&crpNmbr=695119-8&bsNmbr=
  77. ###
  78. Around December 2009 , reports begin to surface of payment processors closing down MIDAS GOLD accounts due to overwhelming amounts of complaints from MIDAS GOLD users not receiving their funds from MIDAS GOLD. OmaMichael himself responds in the thread
  79. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/midas-gold-exchange-c286802.html
  80. ### In the same year, Liberty Reserve is investigated by Costa Rican
  81. authorities due to questions as to their funding sources. By 2011 they are denied a business license for these reasons and forced to dissolve. Liberty Reserve continues to do business illegally by routing through 5 separate Costa Rican corporate entities.
  82. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberty\_Reserve#Criminal\_investigation\_and\_charges
  83. ### MIDAS GOLD would be seized by the United States Global Illicit Financial Team sometime between 2010-2011
  84. http://m-gold.com/index.html
  85. ## 2013-06-13
  86. Extremely dubious reports of the arrest of an Omar Dhanani in Montreal for money laundering crimes appear on press release websites (very unreliable reports)
  87. https://www.businesspress24.com/pressrelease1236813/omar-dhanani-arrested-in-montreal.html
  88. https://web.archive.org/web/20130701234632/http://internetcybercrime.com/montreal-omar-dhanani-arrested-for-money-laundering/
  89. http://www.realscam.com/attachments/f29/4517d1371775999-welcome-patryn-omar.jpg
  90. ## 2014-04-17
  91. Michael Patryn is nominated to the Bitcoin Foundation by Francis Pouliot, who states in his nomination:
  92. "Michael Patryn has been working with digital currencies since 2002 in the capacity of financial consultant, market maker, and exchanger. As a venture capitalist, Michael has actively invested with and supported over twenty companies within the digital currency space."
  93. ### Which 20 companies? 2002 would be the year Omar Dhanani was working with Shadowcrew laundering funds using E-Gold.
  94. ## 2014-01-26
  95. A profile of Michael Patryn is published on the Lifeboat Foundation website listing him as Director of VFS SECURITIES.
  96. ## 2014-11-12
  97. Quadriga Fintech Solutions is founded by Gerald Cotton and Michael Patryn (Only Gerald Cotton is listed on the SEDAR page for the company).
  98. https://sedar.com/DisplayProfile.do?lang=EN&issuerType=03&issuerNo=00037030"
Copied and pasted from: https://pastebin.com/Svap6KSF


Also note early connection between Lovie Horner and Micheal Patryn through the BJJ Foundation (maybe this side-note will be useful at some future point):
https://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/861395-8/world-bjj-federation
Also note early connection between Lovie Horner and Micheal Patryn through the BJJ Foundation (maybe this side-note will be useful at some future point):
https://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/861395-8/world-bjj-federation
submitted by cryptotrader1234 to QuadrigaCX [link] [comments]

Notes from the Hearing Today

Apologies for typos and grammatical errors; wanted to get this out as soon as possible for those that weren't able to watch the live stream. Cleaned up formatting to make it more readable.

While this isn't a 100% word-for-word transcript, the overtone of the meeting should have been conveyed. SEC and CFTC want protections for consumers, but don't want to outright ban crypto. I was under the impression that both agencies were well-educated, but understaffed. They both want to introduce protections for customers and investors and go after scam artists, but don't want to impose any restrictions or regulations that would be bad for crypto as a whole (both from a security perspective, and a technological innovation perspective). Overall a huge positive.

Crapo
Brown
Clayton
Giancarlo
Crapo
Clayton
Giancarlo
Crapo
Clayton
Giancarlo
Crapo
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Sen. Shelby
Clayton
Giancarlo
Sen. Shelby
Clayton
Sen. Shelby
Giancarlo
Clayton
Sen. Shelby
Sen Reed
Clayton
Giancarlo
Sen Reed
Giancarlo
Clayton
Sen Reed
Rounds
Clayton
Rounds
Giancarlo
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Perdue
Clayton
Perdue
Giancarlo
Perdue
Clayton
Giancarlo
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Clayton
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Clayton
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Clayton
Sen. Kennedy
Giancarlo
Sen Kennedy
Giancarlo
Sen Kennedy
Giancarlo
Sen Kennedy
Clayton
Sen Kennedy
Warner
Clayton
Giancarlo
Warner
Clayton
Warner
Giancarlo
Clayton
Cotton
Giancarlo
Clayton
Cotton
Giancarlo
Clayton
Cotton
Clayton
Cotton
Menendez
Giancarlo
Menendez
Giancarlo
Menendez
Giancarlo
Menendez
Clayton
Menendez
Clayton
Moran
Ms. Masto
Clayton
Giancarlo
Ms. Masto
Clayton
Giancarlo
Ms. Masto
Sen Shelby
Clayton
Sen Shelby
Clayton
Giancarlo
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Crapo
submitted by cembry90 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The fundamentals of bitcoin as an asset exist and they are stupider than you can imagine

tldr; tldr; Hodling is deflationary and all those wild price swings from bitcoin are changes in the fundamental value of bitcoin. Really.
tldr; Imagine there is a market where $100 worth of goods are sold every day using 100 bitcoins which cycle around. Then each bitcoin would be worth $1. Now suppose that 50 of the bitcoins were being held in anticipation of growing in value so only 50 bitcoins were cycling each day. For all the goods in the market to be sold every day each bitcoin will now be worth $2.
Introduction There has been a lot of discussion about what the fundamental value of bitcoin is. The consensus view in this subreddit is that the fundamental value is zero. I argue in this post that the fundamental value of bitcoin is whatever the price is right now, or a something close to it. This is because the fundamentals of bitcoin are stupid. Unimaginably stupid.
Bitcoin as Currency Bitcoin is a terrible currency compared to normal statist filthy fiat. Bitcoins are often permanently lost due to hacking or easily made mistakes. Transactions take considerable time to be confirmed. The price is highly volatile. But this post isn’t going into those issues in depth.
There is little evidence for mainstream Bitcoin use. A report by Morgan Stanley on the acceptance of Bitcoin from online retailers found that only 3 out of the 500 online retailers tracked accepted Bitcoin payments, a decrease from 5 in the previous year. The report concluded: “Bitcoin acceptance is virtually zero and shrinking”.
The number of transaction on darknet markets is large. On darknet markets users buy illegal products using cryptocurrencies (not just Bitcoin). Due to their illegal nature, it is impossible to know the exact value of transactions that take place on them. Between February 2011 and July 2013 the darknet market Silk Road had 1,229,465 transactions comprising 9,519,644 bitcoins in revenue. Darknet markets, along with ransomware payments are the only uses where there is evidence of a substantial number of bitcoin transactions taking place.
To work at scale darknet markets require cryptocurrency to pay for goods on sale. The anonymous nature of cryptocurrency allows transactions to take place without the buyer or the seller knowing anything about each other (although if a buyer has drugs mailed to them the seller will know who they are). If darknet markets used another form of payment then law enforcement could buy something and then track both the money going to the seller and the commission paid to the darknet market. It isn’t true as many people have claimed that nothing backs bitcoin. Bitcoin is backed by darknet markets.
There are a few kinds of people who buy bitcoin and want to spend it. They include drug buyers, those who need to pay off ransomware, money launders, fraudsters, and a few others but for simplicity’s sake I will just call them drug buyers. Likewise, there are a few types of people who sell products for bitcoin but again for simplicity’s sake I will call them drug sellers.
Non-circularity Bitcoin is a currency with a property that I call non-circularity. With Actual Money, when I buy something in a shop, the money I paid with goes towards the wages of the staff, rent and the products themselves among other expenses. This money then flows on to others. When a drug seller receives bitcoin in exchange for their drugs they can’t use the bitcoin to pay for their groceries or to pay their rent. They must exchange the bitcoin for filthy fiat to buy food. The inability to use bitcoin for further purchases means it is a non-circular currency. Bitcoin is a medium of a medium of exchange.
A full bitcoin transaction thus consists of three parts:
  1. A drug buyer goes to a bitcoin exchange to get bitcoin in exchange for filthy fiat
  2. The drug buyer goes to the DNM to exchange bitcoin for drugs from the drug seller
  3. The drug seller goes to the bitcoin exchange to get filthy fiat in exchange for bitcoin
An exchange is any place which matches buyers and sellers of bitcoin. This includes online exchanges like Coinbase as well as LocalBitcoins which matches people for face to face transactions. As nobody receives bitcoin for payment except drug dealers, the only place for drug buyers to get bitcoin is an exchange. The extreme volatility of bitcoin means that drug buyers and sellers try to complete the process as quickly as possible and avoid holding onto bitcoin.
Perfect Price Unstickiness For normal currencies prices are sticky. That means that nominal prices do not respond quickly to changing economic conditions. In contrast bitcoin has what I call perfect price unstickiness so the price of goods in bitcoin changes almost perfectly to changes in the value of bitcoin.
This is because prices for items which can be bought with bitcoin are never actually set in bitcoin, probably due to the high volatility. Instead they are set in fiat. The amount in fiat can either be listed directly, so $US50 for these drugs, or the price can be listed in the converted amount of bitcoin, 0.005BTC if 1 BTC = $US10,000. Changes in the price of bitcoin on exchanges are instantly reflected in the prices of drugs in bitcoins on darknet markets.
Hodling Another feature of bitcoin that should be considered is that people hodl bitcoin. The word comes from a typo of ‘hold’. Bitcoin is often bought on exchanges not for use as a currency to buy drugs, but as an asset in expectation of a price rise. Hodlers are the third type of user of bitcoin along with drug buyers and drug sellers. Although they don’t use it.
What’s the difference between an asset that is held and one that is hodled? This is admittedly vague, but an asset is hodled if it is being held, it can be held for long periods at low costs, it can but isn’t generating any income and there are no plans to generate income from it soon.
Cash under the mattress is being hodled, cash in my wallet that I am going to buy stuff with soon is not. Money in my bank account is generating income and so is not hodled. Bitcoin held in anticipation of price rises is being hodled. Bitcoin bought to buy drugs but which has not been used yet is not. Gold stored in a vault is being hodled, gold used for electronics purposes is not (jewellery is a harder case). A vacant block of land with no plans to develop it or use it for anything is being hodled but one that is soon going to have an apartment block built on it is not.
Commodities can be held and do not generate income until sold but it is expensive to hold most commodities for long periods of time. This prevents most commodities from being hodled.
Velocity The velocity of money is the average number of times a unit of fiat changes hands in a period. You can skip the next three paragraphs as they are a little annoying and you can get by without them. Just know that I am defining the velocity of bitcoin as what the velocity of bitcoin would be if no bitcoin was being hodled.
Due to hodling, the velocity of bitcoin under the conventional definition can vary wildly. Consider two cases. Both have 100 bitcoins, 100 transactions a day and all non-hodled bitcoins are spent each day. The first has no hodled bitcoins, the second 50 hodled bitcoins. The first has a velocity of bitcoin of 1 transaction per day, the second is 0.5 per day.
I want a definition of velocity of bitcoin that is not impacted by changes in hodling. I did consider doing this analysis through changes in velocity but the final formula is easier to understand if we find a definition of velocity of bitcoin that is independent of the level of hodling.
The definition that achieves this is (Length of Time)/(Average length of time to complete transaction). When there is no hodling the two definitions agree but the new definition is unchanged by any rise or fall in the level of hodling, which is what we need. From this point on when I refer to the velocity of bitcoin I am referring to the second definition.
The actual time to complete a bitcoin transaction seems to be over a week. In an interview one vendor claimed that it took one week for the bitcoin to be released from escrow and longer to convert it to actual money.
Intuitive argument Assume that the amount of drugs sold on darknet markets changes little from week to week. If the price of bitcoin doubles over the week then the number of bitcoins flowing through the darknet markets will halve. So where have the bitcoins gone? Drug buyers and sellers don’t have them. The only option is hodlers. In fact, it was the hodlers buying the bitcoins that caused the price to change.
Formula The conventional formula for the relationship between velocity of money (V), nominal amount of money (M), price level (P) and real economic activity (Q) is
V*M = P*Q
I am going to change that equation slightly so it now concerns the velocity of bitcoin (V), the total number of bitcoins (M), the price level of bitcoin (P), the total value in fiat of all economic transactions (Q) and the proportion of bitcoins that are hodled (h). If h*M bitcoins are being hodled then there are (1-h)*M bitcoins being used in economic transactions. The new equation is
V*(1-h)*M = P*Q
Next we isolate P:
P = V*(1-h)*M/Q
If the price level changes from 1 to 1.1 that means that there has been 10% inflation over the period and that the value of bitcoin has fallen. To find the value of a single bitcoin we have to take the reciprocal of P and that gives a formula for the true value of bitcoin:
1/P = Q/[V*(1-h)*M]
In the rest of the post when I write the price of bitcoin I mean the price bitcoin sells for on exchanges. I establish in the next section that this price must be close to the true value of bitcoin.
Equilibrium This section uses the flow of bitcoin model established earlier. We assume no activity from hodlers and that economic users do not hodl bitcoin (not true but it simplifies and does not hurt the model). Furthermore, we assume that all activity on the bitcoin exchanges happens, then all activity on the darknet markets happens. Drug sellers sell their bitcoin to drug buyers, then drug buyers use the bitcoin to buy drugs on the darknet markets. Neither the exchanges or the darknet markets charge commissions. I use specific numbers but my reasoning is easily generalizable.
To establish why the equation is true we must consider what happens if the actual price is higher or lower than the price given by the formula. First let us suppose that the price is lower than the price predicted by the formula. Over the time period of a day suppose that Q = 100 (so $100 worth of transactions a day), V = 1 (transactions take a day), M = 100 (100 bitcoins) and h = 0.5 (50 bitcoins are hodled). This gives a predicted price of $2. Suppose the price is instead $1.
Every day there are $100 worth of drugs available to be sold and buyers willing to buy $100 worth of drugs. At a price of $1 and with only 50 bitcoins available for economic use each day that means that only $50 worth of drugs can be sold. This would drop Q to 50 and immediately correct the equation.
However, there are buyers and sellers who want more drug dealing than that. Some buyers are not going to be able to get their drugs given the current price. Some of them will be willing to pay higher prices for bitcoin to guarantee they can have their drugs. Suppose that the drug sellers have 50 bitcoins (hodlers also have 50). They want to sell their 50 bitcoins to drug buyers on an exchange. Some drug buyers then bid the price of bitcoin up to $1.10 (for example). This benefits other drug buyers as now $55 worth of drug transactions can take place each day. In this way, the price will be bid up to $2, the equilibrium price.
If the price is $1 and the drug buyers have the 50 bitcoins then they will spend the bitcoins to buy $50 worth of drugs and then we are in the situation above.
Now suppose the reverse happens and the actual price is higher than the predicted price. Let the actual price be $4, with all the same example values from the previous example, so the predicted price is $2. On the exchange drug sellers have 50 bitcoins worth $200 to sell. Drug buyers want to buy $100 worth of bitcoin. At this price only 25 bitcoins are sold. To ensure they sell more of their bitcoin, drug buyers bid down the price. If the price does not immediately reach $2 then the left-over bitcoins will be held by the drug sellers until the next day when the price will be bid down again.
The drug sellers holding bitcoin for a few extra days is not the same as hodling because they are actively trying to sell them on an exchange but they haven’t because the price isn’t in equilibrium. They could instead decide to sell only 25 bitcoins and hodl the other 25. This would raise h to 0.75 and the price would be in equilibrium again.
Now suppose that the drug buyers have 50 bitcoins and the price is $4. Then $100 worth of drugs are bought with 25 bitcoins. The drug sellers will not be able to sell their bitcoin as drug buyers already have enough bitcoin to buy the next round of drugs they want. The drug buyers spend their last 25 bitcoin and drug sellers now have 50 bitcoins and the situation is as above.
In conclusion, the price of Bitcoin is fundamentally determined by speculators and brought into equilibrium by criminals.
Inflows and Outflows of Hodling The previous section treated the level of hodling as constant, except when drug buyers or sellers decide to hodl extra bitcoins that are in their possession. Now we will treat the amount of hodled bitcoins as changing. The next topic to consider is the relationship between filthy fiat spent to hodl bitcoins and the bitcoin price.
To calculate how much it costs to raise the hodl ratio from 0 to h we assume that the bitcoins are bought continuously. We integrate the function Q/[M*V*(1-t/M)] between 0 and h*M. The result is (Q/V)ln[1/(1-h)].
To double the price of bitcoin by taking h from 0 to 0.5 will cost (Q/V)ln(2). In fact, it will always cost this amount to double the price of bitcoin as we can see by finding the difference between the total value of hodled bitcoin when we consider hodling levels of h and (h+1)/2.
This means that the price of bitcoin rises exponentially when a constant amount of new money buys bitcoin to hodl. I would illustrate this with a log-scale graph but I don’t know where to find one. It also means that the market capitalisation of a cryptocurrency gives very little idea about how much the cryptocurrency is worth. It is an impossibility for all hodlers to receive the Actual Money that they think their bitcoin is worth.
Volatility People hoping to get rich and their buying and selling bitcoin is what causes bitcoin’s extreme volatility. Theoretically this could be stopped if there was a bank where hodlers could deposit their bitcoins and earn interest. However, for this to work would require the existence of a bitcoin bank which is not a Ponzi which seems like an unlikely outcome.
Hodling Gold A quick digression into gold, but I suspect someone has already thought of what follows. We can consider gold like a conventional commodity with conventional supply and demand curves (the real world for all commodities is more complicated but this is going to be quick). But people also hodl gold. If hodlers decide to buy $100 million worth of gold produced in the year, then that will change the equilibrium price. The new price is such that the difference between the quantity demanded by non-hodlers and the quantity supplied at that price multiplied by the price is 100 million.
If the overall level of hodling declines then the reverse happens. The hodlers sell an amount of gold, that amount is the difference between the amount supplied and demanded. The hodlers earn that amount multiplied by the new lower price. (I assumed people bought a fiat amount of gold and sold a volume of gold to make things easier).
Without another hodler to take on the gold or an improvement in market conditions, the hodlers are guaranteed a loss. To make a profit hodling gold you need there to be hodlers to sell it on to (or an improvement in the underlying factors). It follows that all the gold hodled in the world today cannot be sold without causing the fundamentals of gold to collapse. With 40% of the gold produced in 2017 being hodled this will eventually become a significant issue.
Full Reserve Banking Another place where we can consider the impact of hodling is full reserve banking. It is a form of banking where banks are required to have cash on hand equal to the full amount in all demand deposit accounts. The bank does not lend this money. This contrasts with the present system where banks are only required to have a certain fraction of this amount on hand, called fractional reserve banking. Money in a fractional reserve bank account is not being hodled (or is, but to a more limited degree) as it is being lent on to other people and it is generating income for the depositor.
Deposits under full reserve banking are hodling. They are like cash stuffed under a mattress but have better security. In a recession people increase their saving rates. Much of this additional saving will be in liquid assets because of fears of economic trouble. This rise in deposits under full reserve is an increase in hodled cash which then causes deflation. This is a big problem in a recession. (Somebody else has probably already made this observation).
Velocity and Value Consider the equation of bitcoin’s value again. Notice that the value increases when V decreases. Which means that the length of time to complete a transaction has increased. Bitcoin is an asset and a currency and its value as an asset increases as the length of time it takes to complete a transaction increases. This is a minor bit of stupidity which surprised me but seems obvious in retrospect as if bitcoins take longer to be processed then they must be worth more so that all transactions can happen. (This is assuming that a decrease in V does not also cause a decrease in Q which might be caused by drug buyers and sellers switching to a different cryptocurrency).
Hodler Behavior With one exception which I might make in another post I make no assumptions about hodler behaviour. I think they are buying and selling with no rational basis. But there are two rational reasons why someone would expect the price of bitcoin to rise: increased economic activity using the cryptocurrency in the darknet markets or an increased level of hodling in the future. The DNM is an actual economic activity but due to its illegality knowing anything about the amounts involved is impossible for almost everyone as is predicting their trends. Future hodling levels are also impossible to predict, unless you run a pump and dump. We can’t expect any sort of rational behavior from hodlers.
Nakamoto Scheme Preston Byrne developed the concept of a Nakamoto Scheme to describe cryptocurrencies because of how they differed from Ponzis and pyramid schemes. While bitcoin has been frequently called a Ponzi or pyramid scheme it is clearly something different. There are no “dividends” paid or any sort of organised structure. There are similarities, notably early adopters make their money at the expense of later adopters. Like in pyramid schemes hodlers try to convince new people to join in.
It is best to consider bitcoin as a type of asset which is uniquely suited for a pump and dump. When hodlers buy bitcoin, and encourage others to do the same (the pump) the fundamental price of bitcoin really is raised by these actions which helps the pump.
To add to Byrne’s work, we should put the properties of cryptocurrency assets at the centre of the scheme. A Nakamoto scheme works like this: first create a cryptocurrency and keep most of it for yourself. Then release it and try to get as many other people hodling as possible and try to get the darknet markets to adopt it (I’m looking at you Monero). This increases the fundamental value of the asset. Then dump your hodlings. Pocket the actual money. This is probably legal right now. But I’m not a law-knowing person.
For the hodler the Nakamoto scheme is like going to a party. You arrive and leave later on. If there are more people at the party when you leave compared to when you arrived then you’ve made a profit. There is also drug dealing going on at the party. The change in the level of drug dealing also impacts your profits. You have to try and get more people to come to the party and be careful of everyone else at the party who have the exact same incentives as you. It is a weird new form of scam.
Lower bound on price While the price of bitcoin can theoretically be infinitely high there is a lower bound on the price when the hodling ratio is zero. For given levels of Q, V and M the value of bitcoin can never go below Q/[V*M] (the highest possible price for bitcoin is when 1 satoshi is equal to the value of a transaction).
Some bitcoins have been permanently lost due to people losing their wallet keys or bitcoins being sent to the wrong address. If we suppose that H is the proportion of coins that have been permanently lost then the actual lower bound is Q/[V*(1-H)*M]. Note that a hodler losing their coins does not change the present fundamental value of bitcoin.
What could cause bitcoin’s price to go lower? Besides a mass hodler sell-off the obvious reason is a permanent decline in Q. What could cause this? Law enforcement have successfully shut down many darknet markets but others have replaced them quickly. What could really hurt darknet markets is increased government scrutiny of exchanges. When governments realise that bitcoin has no use beyond criminal transactions and speculation they might decide to treat every bitcoin transaction as inherently suspicious and regulate exchanges heavily. This will make bitcoin much harder to use for criminal transactions and thus greatly decrease Q and the value of bitcoin.
Previous work This post is not entirely original. Satoshi himself said that if a bitcoin user wanted to give a donation to everyone else then they should delete the keys to their wallet and increase the value of everybody else’s bitcoins. I realised that someone who hodled a bitcoin would temporarily have the same effect.
More significantly Joseph C Wang came up with a formula very similar to mine. A significant difference is that he thought increased economic activity with bitcoin would not cause an increase in bitcoin’s value but an increase in its velocity. My model has nominal prices of drugs in bitcoin falling when Q increases. Wang has prices remaining the same and the velocity of bitcoin increasing to handle the extra transactions. I developed my formula before I became aware of Wang’s work.
Further Topics This post is over 4000 words so I have not gone into depth on a few subjects like the costs of block rewards (higher than you think), shocks like darknet market shutdowns, why bitcoin can’t fall to a liquidity trap, how to value a cryptocurrency that isn’t being used for economic transactions and why it makes sense that bitcoin and bcash had a higher combined value at the time of the fork compared to bitcoin alone. If there is demand I’ll put together a second post which will cover these issues.
submitted by GBerkeley1734 to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Up to $2.9 Billion Worth of Crypto Could Have Been Lost in “Investment” Scheme

Up to $2.9 Billion Worth of Crypto Could Have Been Lost in “Investment” Scheme
https://preview.redd.it/lq785myyiih31.png?width=700&format=png&auto=webp&s=c7dbdc64e0ed78249070c4de1540b298dfad4af4
Cryptocurrency intelligence firm Ciphertrace estimates that up to $2.9 billion worth of cryptocurrencywas lost by investors in PlusToken, a popular “investment program” that exhibited many characteristics of a Ponzi scheme. PlusToken was primarily popular in Asia.
For starters, PlusToken advertised a monthly return on investment between 8 and 16 percent simply for depositing their cryptocurrency. The scheme claimed that they were using arbitrage between cryptocurrency exchanges and cloud mining to provide the returns for investors. Of course, users could also profit from bringing new investors into the scheme.
In late June, PlusToken investors were suddenly unable to withdraw their crypto funds, with PlusToken citing technical difficulties as the reason for the freeze on withdrawals. This coincided with reports of six people connected with an “internet scam” being arrested on Vanuatu by Chinese authorities. The six people were later revealed to be affilated with PlusToken.
At present, PlusToken’s website, mobile application and exchange are inaccessible, leaving users with little hope of ever getting their crypto back.

PlusToken was likely not behind last week’s crypto price crash

When the cryptocurrency market saw a sudden price crash last week, there was widespread speculation that the “dump” was caused by PlusToken liquidating their ill-gotten gains on cryptocurrency exchanges.
However, Bloomberg cites TokenAnalyst co-founder Sid Shekhar as saying that the firm did not find on-chain evidence that PlusToken moved its crypto funds to exchanges recently:
“It doesn’t look like any of these addresses are exchange owned. […] So that was enlightening. We’ll keep an eye on this to see if they do move the 100s of millions into exchanges at some point.”
Shekhar also said that a large portion of the funds controlled by PlusToken was sent through cryptocurrency mixers and similar services in an effort to disguise the origin of the funds.
submitted by GTE_IO to u/GTE_IO [link] [comments]

Clear evidence that Micheal Patryn is Omar Dhanani and connection to other staff

Notice Micheal Patryn and Nazmin Dhanani are listed as officers in the company MPD Advertising: https://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/726420-8/mpd-advertising-inc

Also Intraday56 Explained it well here https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/7nt7ys/question_is_quadrigacx_legit_with_all_the/ds4ihco (copied and pasted for your convenience):
"Michael Patryn is one of the founders of Quadrigacx. He is part of a criminal mafia mob and has been to jail before for carding theft, ID theft and ponzi schemes. His real name is Omar Dhanani. Here's an article from coindesk that names Patryn as the cofounder of QuadrigaCx:
https://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-exchange-quadriga-public-reverse-takeover
Omar Dhanani aka Michael Patryn was one of 6 men arrested for internet ID theft and credit card conspiracy fraud back in 2005. They were operating Shadowcrew.com, a web mob of highly organized criminals. For more info google ShadowCrew.
https://www.justice.gov/archive/opa/p2005/Novembe05_crm_619.html
At the time ShadowCrew was busted by the US Secret Service Omar Dhanani was a resident of Fountain Valley, California. A search on Intelius lists Omar R. Dhanani from Fountain valley, CA along with his relatives, Nazmin Dhanani and Nabatbibi Dhanani.
www.intelius.com/people/Omar-Dhanani/Fountain%20Valley-CA/06DPMG23XKS
Now here is where it gets interesting. Nazmin Dhanini and Michael Patryn have apparently registered several companies together, one of them being MPD Advertising:
http://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/726420-8/mpd-advertising-inc
Omar Dhanini relatives: Nazmin Dhanani and Nabatbibi Dhanani
Michael Patryn: registered at least one company, MPD Advertising Inc with Nazmin Dhanini."

See pastebin below for more info:

"# Michael Patryn

  1. aka. Omar Dhanani
  2. aka. Omar Patryn
  3. ## 2004-10-28
  4. Arrested and convicted in California under the name of Omar Dhanani as a member of Shadowcrew, an organization trafficking stolen credit and identity information primarily using E-Gold
  5. IMPORTANT: Omar Dhanani used the alias Voleur (french for "thief") during his time with Shadowcrew. This is one of the primary connecting threads between the Omar Dhanani and his later aliases as Patryn, owner of VFS-NETWORKS
  6. https://www.justice.gov/archive/opa/p2005/Novembe05_crm_619.html
  7. https://web.archive.org/web/20130216063323/http://www.secretservice.gov/press/pub2304.pdf
  8. https://www.justice.gov/sites/default/files/usao-nj/legacy/2013/11/29/Kolarov%2C%20Aleksi%20Indictment.pdf
  9. ### 2004-10-04
  10. According to a Bloomberg article from January 2006 citing a United States Secret Service affidavit, Omar:
  11. "boasted in a chat room that he moved between $40,000 and $100,000 a week. He pled guilty in November to conspiracy to commit fraud and faces up to five years in prison."
  12. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2006-01-08/gold-rush
  13. ## 2004-10-29
  14. Users on Talkgold forum begin discussing the possibility that a prolific user on the forum, "Patryn" is actually Omar Dhanani.
  15. https://web.archive.org/web/20130510055547/http://www.talkgold.com/forum/r256207-.html
  16. ## 2005-11-18
  17. An article in The Register describes how Omar Dahnani and 5 others plead guilty to charges laid on them in November 2014:
  18. "The group of six pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud in New Jersey on Thursday in exchange for the state dropping other charges pending against them, Wired reports. They were named as: Andrew Mantovani, 23, and Brandon Monchamp, 22, of Arizona; Kim Taylor, 47, and Omar Dhanani, 22, of California; Jeremy Stephens, 31, of North Carolina; and Jeremy Zielinski, 22, of Florida. In total, 12 people have now pleaded guilty to Shadowcrew-related charges."
  19. "Shadowcrew members are expected to be sentenced between mid-February and mid-March 2006."
  20. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/11/18/shadowcrew/
  21. ## 2007-05-23
  22. According to US Federal Prison Records, an Omar Dhanani is released from Federal Prison
  23. https://www.bop.gov/inmateloc/
  24. ## 2008-04-03
  25. MIDAS GOLD Exchange is registered in Canada
  26. under the name Omar Patryn
  27. Specialized in processing anonymous purchases and sale of early digital currencies, particularly Liberty Reserve. (Liberty Reserve was shut down in 2013 for money laundering and facilitating identity theft, credit card theft, narcotics trafficking, and child pornography)
  28. https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sccc/CorporationsCanada/fdrlCrpDtls.html?corpId=6951198&V_TOKEN=1511930988373&crpNm=&crpNmbr=695119-8&bsNmbr=
  29. http://www.hyipforum.pl/topic/779-m-gold-midas-gold-exchange-obni%C5%BCona-prowizja-dla-forumowicz%C3%B3w/
  30. ## 2008-05-30
  31. DNSGEO.COM domain is registered in Panama
  32. This domain was used as an alternative gateway to VFS-NETWORK.COM as seen in the internet archive
  33. https://web.archive.org/web/20110207131437/http://dnsgeo.com/
  34. https://whois.icann.org/en/lookup?name=dnsgeo.com
  35. for comparison:
  36. https://web.archive.org/web/20101218100404/http://vfs-network.com/
  37. ### Reports from users claim that phishing emails we're received from this domain (DNSGEO.COM) shortly after disputing problems with MIDAS GOLD withdrawals and deposits.
  38. Images are included.
  39. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/midas-gold-exchange-c440529.html
  40. ## 2008-08-27
  41. HD-MONEY.COM domain is registered as being located in the Bahamas
  42. https://whois.icann.org/en/lookup?name=www.hd-money.com
  43. ## 2009-02-09
  44. VFS-NETWORK.com domain is registered
  45. (Voleur Financial Services)
  46. https://web.archive.org/web/20090225095825/http://www.vfs-network.com:80/
  47. VFS Network was an exchange network bringing together
  48. e-money services like Liberty Reserve and other OmaMichael projects like HD-MONEY.COM, XXX-CHANGE.COM and MIDAS GOLD.
  49. Website now points to dns.shadowserver.org, a volunteer service often used by legal authorities to capture data from incoming traffic to the webpage (Was used by authorities after Liberty Reserve's domain was seized)
  50. https://whois.icann.org/en/lookup?name=vfs-network.com
  51. https://krebsonsecurity.com/2013/05/reports-liberty-reserve-founder-arrested-site-shuttered/#more-20723
  52. ### 2009-10-02
  53. VFS-Network publishes that they have met with the management of Liberty Reserve
  54. https://web.archive.org/web/20101129134240/http://vfs-network.com/main.htm
  55. ### NOTE: Voleur is mentioned as an alias by users on dreamteammoney.com, along with complaints related to MIDAS GOLD. These complaints relate a MIDAS GOLD policy of withholding client's funds depending on how many emails they sent asking about the status of their funds.
  56. http://www.dreamteammoney.com/index.php?showtopic=130170&hl=voleur
  57. ### IMPORTANT: "OWNER" of VFS-NETWORK frequently appears online under the name of Patryn, connecting the alias to Omar Patryn of MIDAS GOLD, although Patryn can be found denying any relationship whatsoever between the businesses. In the same thread below on ComplaintsBoard, Patryn posts with a VFS-NETWORK avatar while describing why he, as an administrator on a MIDAS GOLD-managed forum deleted posts of users making complaints.
  58. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/midas-gold-exchange-c286802.html#c546412
  59. http://www.realscam.com/members/patryn/
  60. ## 2009-05-02
  61. HD-MONEY.COM CEO (Michael Patryn aka Omar Dhanani) informs clients that they are now partnered with Liberty Reserve
  62. https://web.archive.org/web/20100115074839/http://www.hd-money.com/Usecms.aspx?Page=ceo
  63. ## 2009-09-10
  64. XXX-CHANGE.COM domain is registered (although internet archive shows an xxx-change.com as far back as 2001)
  65. Images from internet archive show an important partnership with HD-MONEY and VFS-NETWORK
  66. https://web.archive.org/web/20130628192252/http://xxx-change.com:80/
  67. ## 2009-10-22
  68. MPD ADVERTISING is founded by Nazin Dhanani and Michael Patryn in Vancouver
  69. Nazin is thought to be a sibling of Omar Dhanani aka Michael Patryn
  70. http://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/726420-8/mpd-advertising-inc
  71. ## 2009-12-25
  72. Complaints surface online about MIDAS GOLD withholding funds with recommendations to report to the Canadian police
  73. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/perfect-money-corporation-c287831.html#c546416
  74. ## 2009-12-30
  75. MIDAS GOLD business registration is dissolved by Omar Patryn, but forums show that services continued well into 2011
  76. https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sccc/CorporationsCanada/fdrlCrpDtls.html?corpId=6951198&V_TOKEN=1511930988373&crpNm=&crpNmbr=695119-8&bsNmbr=
  77. ###
  78. Around December 2009 , reports begin to surface of payment processors closing down MIDAS GOLD accounts due to overwhelming amounts of complaints from MIDAS GOLD users not receiving their funds from MIDAS GOLD. OmaMichael himself responds in the thread
  79. https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/midas-gold-exchange-c286802.html
  80. ### In the same year, Liberty Reserve is investigated by Costa Rican
  81. authorities due to questions as to their funding sources. By 2011 they are denied a business license for these reasons and forced to dissolve. Liberty Reserve continues to do business illegally by routing through 5 separate Costa Rican corporate entities.
  82. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberty_Reserve#Criminal_investigation_and_charges
  83. ### MIDAS GOLD would be seized by the United States Global Illicit Financial Team sometime between 2010-2011
  84. http://m-gold.com/index.html
  85. ## 2013-06-13
  86. Extremely dubious reports of the arrest of an Omar Dhanani in Montreal for money laundering crimes appear on press release websites (very unreliable reports)
  87. https://www.businesspress24.com/pressrelease1236813/omar-dhanani-arrested-in-montreal.html
  88. https://web.archive.org/web/20130701234632/http://internetcybercrime.com/montreal-omar-dhanani-arrested-for-money-laundering/
  89. http://www.realscam.com/attachments/f29/4517d1371775999-welcome-patryn-omar.jpg
  90. ## 2014-04-17
  91. Michael Patryn is nominated to the Bitcoin Foundation by Francis Pouliot, who states in his nomination:
  92. "Michael Patryn has been working with digital currencies since 2002 in the capacity of financial consultant, market maker, and exchanger. As a venture capitalist, Michael has actively invested with and supported over twenty companies within the digital currency space."
  93. ### Which 20 companies? 2002 would be the year Omar Dhanani was working with Shadowcrew laundering funds using E-Gold.
  94. ## 2014-01-26
  95. A profile of Michael Patryn is published on the Lifeboat Foundation website listing him as Director of VFS SECURITIES.
  96. ## 2014-11-12
  97. Quadriga Fintech Solutions is founded by Gerald Cotton and Michael Patryn (Only Gerald Cotton is listed on the SEDAR page for the company).
  98. https://sedar.com/DisplayProfile.do?lang=EN&issuerType=03&issuerNo=00037030"
Copied and pasted from: https://pastebin.com/Svap6KSF


Also note early connection between Lovie Horner and Micheal Patryn through the BJJ Foundation (maybe this side-note will be useful at some future point):
https://www.companiesofcanada.com/company/861395-8/world-bjj-federation
submitted by cryptotrader1234 to QuadrigaCX2 [link] [comments]

Is Bitcoin a Ponzi Scheme? Is Bitcoin a Pyramid or Ponzi Scheme? One Of Asia's Largest Banks Says Bitcoin Is 'A Ponzi Scheme'  CNBC Bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme Bubble Bitcoin a Pyramid or Ponzi Scheme?

Bloomberg has forecast bitcoin to reach its record high of $20,000, and possibly $28,000, this year. According to the company’s June Crypto Outlook report, “something has to really go wrong ... The Bank of New York Mellon (BNY Mellon) allegedly played a role in the $4 billion Ponzi scheme OneCoin. According to a filing by investors Donald Berdeaux and Christine Gablis, BNY Mellon has been accused of playing a “central role” in the OneCoin scam that defrauded investors of more than $4 billion in cryptoassets. Philippines Regulator Warns Investors to Steer Clear of Mining City's Bitcoin Vault Ponzi. There’s a mining contract scheme people are discussing and making the rounds on the web called ... Ex-trader gets more than five years in US$20M Ponzi scheme Chris Dolmetsch , Bloomberg News A traffic light stands in front of scaffolding surrounding 1 Wall Street near the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, Aug. 24, 2018. This is not the first time bitcoin has been likened to a Ponzi scheme. Unlike traditional currencies, bitcoin isn’t used to buy goods and services in much of the world. Most owners are holding it as an investment, hoping for price appreciation. The digital currency’s value increased 14-fold last year, before crashing by 44 per cent so far this year. Furthermore, bitcoin is owned by a few ...

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Is Bitcoin a Ponzi Scheme?

Why Bitcoin Is a Ponzi Scheme with David Heinemeier Hansson - Duration: 52:52. Make More Marbles Recommended for you. 52:52. Bitcoin to $30k in 2018 After Crash - Duration: 9:25. ... In this video INTJ CEO Clarke Towson talks about ponzi schemes and pyramid schemes and how Bitcoin is either of these things but government defined benefit pension schemes and fractional reserve ... David Gledhill, group chief information officer at DBS, one of Asia's largest banks, said he believes bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://... Lies that stock market experts spread and fake media eat up. This video is about YBitcoin. Watch in 360 the inside of a nuclear reactor from the size of an atom with virtual reality - Duration: 3:42. EDF in the UK Recommended for you. 360°

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