Five Best Wallets - Lifehacker

Tkeycoin — security, that’s what we’re betting on

Tkeycoin — security, that’s what we’re betting on
Today we will talk about the security of using the Tkeycoin platform and the TKEYSPACE mobile blockchain wallet.
Tkeycoin is a peer-to-peer payment system based on p2p principles and the concept of electronic cash. P2P technology is a fairer means of mutual settlements between users and companies around the world. Modern payment systems are imperfect and may depend on the will of high-ranking officials.
We approached the market from an economic and scientific point of view, borrowing the best from Bitcoin, Ethereum, DASH, and other alternative currencies, mixing modern concepts and building on the global experience of IBM, Microsoft and a number of other companies and research.
The Tkeycoin blockchain is protected by various mechanisms that include advanced cryptographic methods and mathematical models of behavior and decision-making. Blockchain technology prevents duplication or destruction of digital assets.

https://i.redd.it/idy42g9rntx41.gif
In addition to providing security and recording transactions in registers, cryptography also plays a role in ensuring the security of wallets used to store Tkeycoin. Paired public and private keys, which respectively allow users to receive and send payments, are created using asymmetric encryption or public-key cryptography. Public keys are used to generate digital signatures for transactions, which allows you to authenticate ownership of the coins being sent.

https://i.redd.it/95yuky0tntx41.gif
The asymmetric cryptography architecture does not allow anyone other than the owner of the private key to access funds stored in the cryptocurrency wallet, so these funds are kept safe until the owner decides to spend them.
In simple words, in the Tkeycoin peer-to-peer system, only you are the real owner of your money and only You have access to it.
Using tools such as a local Tkeycoin Core wallet or TkeySpace provides you with reliable storage, privacy, and security.
TkeySpace, in turn, adds maximum usability by combining the highest level of security and easy intuitive design.

https://i.redd.it/f0de51vuntx41.gif

How does TKEYSPACE provide security?

TKEYSPACE is one of the first applications that support blockchain in a mobile device and is also the first decentralized application of the TKEY platform.
Its serverless architecture provides the highest level of security for storing all assets in the application. unlike centralized applications that are managed by companies, TkeySpace does not have a Central management authority and operates in accordance with all the principles of peer-to-peer networks.

https://preview.redd.it/4bret8hwntx41.png?width=1253&format=png&auto=webp&s=535c5d879a36eac4ca8c807ee7af1b5fe05e12a9
As we said above, the wallets in the blockchain have a public and private key. Centralized applications usually store users ‘private keys on their servers, which makes users’ funds vulnerable to hacker attacks or theft.
TkeySpace-stores the encrypted key only on the user’s device and in encrypted form. The encrypted key is displayed as a mnemonic phrase (backup phrase), which is very convenient for users. Unlike complex cryptographic ciphers, the phrase is easy to save or write. The backup phrase provides the maximum level of security and thanks to its usual appearance, an attacker is unlikely to ever guess what these words are and what they are for.
A mnemonic phrase is 12 or 24 words that are generated using random number entropy. If the phrase consists of 12 words, then the number of possible combinations is 2048¹² or 211³² — the phrase will have 132 security bits. To restore the wallet, you must enter the mnemonic phrase in the strict order as it was presented after generation.
And so that you do not get confused in the definitions and concepts, we will briefly describe simple and clear principles of how it all works. Let’s look briefly at the factors.

Lock Screen

The simplest thing that protects your phone from unauthorized access is Pincode, a snake, a fingerprint or a Face Id login. And it would seem that this is related to TKEYSPACE?
https://i.redd.it/sspjjsgyntx41.gif
  • At a minimum, it is almost impossible to open new mobile devices and pick up a pin code, even in the case of theft, most often the factory settings are reset, which leads to the deletion of all data on the phone, respectively-your funds are safe even for this reason.
  • Even if there was some “craftsman” and somehow managed to change the pin code on your device, the TKEYSPACE app will automatically delete all the keys and backup phrases, the wallet will simply be empty, and the attacker will be left with nothing.
As we can see, even a simple screen lock with a pin or fingerprint protects your data. It’s not as simple a screen lock as you and I might think.
Every platform, whether it’s Android or AppStore, uses specialized key stores. Cryptography, symmetric and asymmetric encryption, keys, and certificates are directly related to this task.
Keys and certificates that are used to protect information must also be securely protected. Android uses Keystore, a certificate and a Keystore, for this purpose.
Keystore is a specialized secret data store that is used by Java applications to encrypt, authenticate, and establish HTTPS connections.
For two-way authentication, the client and server exchange certificates, respectively, and the server and client must have a Keystore with a private/public key pair and a certificate. In other words, the Keystore is used to store keys and certificates that are used to identify the key owner (client or server).
Starting with Android 8, the encryption systems have been upgraded, the system is checked for signs of hacking at startup, and the screen lock allows you to restrict access to the device. Data encryption and the use of keys ensure the security of information when it is stored and transmitted.

https://i.redd.it/2c0b9re1otx41.gif
In the new version of the OS — Android 9 (Pie) — the developers also added support for hardware to protect against unauthorized changes.
Android apps run in an isolated software environment that restricts access to your information to other apps. OS components are also protected, which prevents attackers from exploiting system errors for their purposes.
Android uses both hardware and software to protect users and their data. Therefore, even at the operating system level, there are a lot of security factors. Of course, if you “flash” the phone (change the factory firmware) and enable Root access, this will reduce the security of Your device, but this is more an exception than a rule and such changes are usually introduced by very experienced users.
IOS uses Keychain — a specialized database for storing metadata and confidential information. Using a Keychain is the best practice for storing small pieces of data that are critical to your apps, such as secrets and passwords. In addition to the Keychain, Apple provides a full range of maximum protection for Your device.
And so we will continue,

Passcode in the app

Now we understand that to get access to the tools, an attacker needs to hack the hardware security of the Google and Apple giants to somehow get access to the app, which is impossible.
To increase security and eliminate other risk factors, we have included an access code (secret code) in the app.
You set an additional level of security by enabling a pin code to log in to the app. The access code additionally encrypts all data stored in the app.
Just so you understand — it’s not just numbers that you enter on the screen, this combination affects the ciphers inside the app. When creating a key, a user interface element is called. when the user swipes the screen, the application receives a random set of bytes — thus, all information is additionally covered by a new layer of cryptography.
And as we said above, if you try to disable the pin code, the app will delete all the data, and the attacker will be left with nothing.
As we have already realized, only 2 of these factors provide the maximum level of security for the TKEYSPACE application.
And the most important thing is that the application runs on the blockchain, which guarantees its full Autonomous operation, data immutability, and privacy.
Generation of new addresses, absence of accounts, phone numbers, e-mail and other personal data-provides you with a social level of security, which is a huge advantage in our time.
In a world where security is based on the level of cryptography, attackers try to influence You with the human factor using social engineering, so when you use applications with accounts, phone numbers, you have more risks.
Social engineering is a method of obtaining the necessary access to information based on the characteristics of human psychology.
For example, a copy of a SIM-card has become a new tool for fraudsters, but there is no personal information in TKEYSPACE, so even such groups of fraudsters can’t get access to your funds.

You don’t have to worry about security — it’s already built into the TKEYSPACE system.

A mixed encryption system based on the principles of computational complexity, with the deterministic generation of signatures using elliptic curves, provides absolute security and safety of user funds, and reserve phrases will help you restore funds at any moment.
A mnemonic phrase is 12 or 24 words that are generated using the entropy of random numbers.
If the phrase consists of 12 words, then the number of possible combinations is 2048¹² or 211³² — the phrase will have 132 security bits. To restore the wallet, you must enter the mnemonic phrase in the strict order as it was presented after generation.
Only you and no one else has access to the phrase. When you get the key, the app has restrictions on the screenshot, and the clipboard is disabled, which protects against malicious software.
It is you, as a user, who sees the phrases, and everything in the device is encrypted, the blockchain architecture protects against hacker attacks, information forgery, and other hacks.
For those who are a bit obsessed with persecution mania, we offer a small lifehack:
Buy several USB drives, connect them to a device that does not have access to the Internet, preferably on a clean operating system, create a text file, write backup phrases there, and encrypt the USB drives with passwords.

https://i.redd.it/shan90o4otx41.gif
Once again, to ensure security and easy recovery, it is enough to record backup phrases once and make several backups. you do not need to resort to an additional encryption method, because we have already done everything for you :)
https://i.redd.it/ogpu09l6otx41.gif
submitted by tkeycoin to Tkeycoin_Official [link] [comments]

Weekly Update: Parachute Townhall, Welcome $GET to ParJar, Uptrennd reaches 50k members, Fantom on IncognitoChain... – 6 Dec - 12 Dec'19

Weekly Update: Parachute Townhall, Welcome $GET to ParJar, Uptrennd reaches 50k members, Fantom on IncognitoChain... – 6 Dec - 12 Dec'19
Hi Parachuters! As part of 2 of 3 from today's rapid catch up series of pending updates, here’s your week at Parachute + partners (6 Dec - 12 Dec'19):

As mentioned last week, Cap and Ice hosted a townhall to talk about where we are at and where we are heading along with ample feedback and Q&A from the community. We covered a lot of ground: "value hypothesis for ParJar, Product Market fit, and our growth approach for 2020...performance of two key PAR utility metrics, staking and gas, and how we see growth for each in 2020...questions from the community and reviewed upcoming community initiatives". Click here to catch up on all that happened. GET Protocol’s $GET token was added to ParJar this week. Belated Birthday wishes to Doc Vic from Cuba. Jason lost a 5k $PAR wager with Cap on Victor’s age. Haha. Congratulations to Martha for winning this week’s Parena. As per the latest Fantasy Premier League (#FPL) update shared by LordHades this week, he is still ruling the charts at the top with NovelCloud and Alexis hot on his heels. From next week, "You can now view your first opponent in the 2019/20 FPL Cup on the My Team page - under Leagues". While you slay those miles with the Parachute Running Club (which has done 44 miles so far BTW), here’s a podcast to listen to. Cap’s recommendation: "It's geared towards people building products - but super super useful to think about any products you use. Skip to like 9 minutes in to skip through all the advertiesments ". Yes, I know. Cap wouldn’t be Cap without typos. Typos FTW!
Parachute townhall
Parachute-themed shirts designed by Doc Vic and Alejandro on Doc’s birthday. These are sick!
If you want to see yourself on the Parachute world map, make sure to enter your location here. The entries are anonymous. In this week's Parachute Fantasy Football League update, Hang is in the first position followed by Clinton and Andy. Connor made it to the playoffs and is now in 4th position. So it means farewell to Nilz, Ken, Kamo and Cap from this season. CoD mobile players, don't forget to join the Parachute WarZone hosted by Doc Vic from Cuba. I hear there's $PAR and $AMGO to be won! The TTR Hat Contest ended this week with some solid entries running in the lead. Epic creation Wendell! In this week’s creative prompt by Jason, Parachuters had to “do 3 nice things for a total stranger”. Basically, be a true blue Parachuter 😊. For this week's Two-for-Tuesday, Gian made it free-for-all. No theme. Post music as you wish and win 500 $PAR. Cool! Benjamin and Charlotte hosted trivias in TTR this week. Those were loads of fun! Andy announced the start of a College Football Bowl Game Pickem contest in Parachute. 100k $PAR prize pool. Doc Vic hosted another round of Champions League wager this week in TTR.
So much epicness in one picture. Jose, you are a genius!
Andy's Advent Calendar journey continues
Catch up on the latest aXpire update and 20k AXPR burn here and here respectively. As you would already know, instead of pitting both startups against each other, XIO decided to accept both Opacity and Uptrennd into the incubator program and opened up staking for them. This marks the official launch of the XIO Blockchain Incubator and it’s been a roaring start with USD 7k worth of tokens locked up in one hour and Opacity portal getting oversubscribed in no time. Video instructions for staking can be found here. Read up on the startups here. In three days, the total staking crossed 1M XIO levels. Insane! That is a great metric to measure performance. How does the $XIO token play a role in all this? The crew explained in this tweet thread. And with that a series of related discussions got off starting with the possibility of self-nomination for startups. Have a sub-100 CMC project that you think should be part of the incubator? Don’t forget to tag them. Plus, a cool 25k $XIO giveaway was launched. Remember, meaningful conversation is always welcome at the incubator and more often than not, they get rewarded. Check out the latest update on the Birdchain App SMS feature along with an expanded list of supported countries. Silent Notary reduced the $LAW token requirement for running a Masternode from 100M to 20M this week. Russian research company sudexpa.ru also gave its vote of confidence to Silent Notary in terms of its immutability. Wibson Marketing Manager Fi Scantamburlo attended the Latin American Bitcoin Conference Uruguay to speak on Data privacy, monetisation and how Wibson helps achieve these. Opacity now allows shared file preview for uploaded docs.
Shared File Preview on Opacity
Fantom's foray into the Afghan Ministry of Health's efforts to fight counterfeit drugs and other public health initiatives were covered by Forbes this week. Last week, we shared that Sikoba's e-voting platform, Itugen, which is based on Fantom’s Lachesis consensus was released. This week, they published its technical whitepaper. With so many moving parts in the project and so much happening all around, a recap is always a welcome refresher to catch up. $FTM got listed on South Korea’s Coinone with a $KRW pairing. It was also integrated with the IncognitoChain project’s pDEX with a $pUSDT pairing (remember, Harmony was added to the same platform a few days back?). IncognitoChain allows cryptos to be transacted privately using sidechains including those coins/tokens which are not privacy-oriented. Fantom also launched a developer portal and technical documentation ahead of the XAR Network mainnet release. The interoperability bridge is out as well. This allows both ERC20 and BEP2 token holders to move their tokens to the XAR Network. The wallet allows both staking and delegation. For the guide to joining XAR Network as a validator node, click here. A simple guide to staking on XAR Network can be found here. The team also sat down for an AMA with COTI this week. Blockchain Magazine’s interview of Michael was published. Continuing with Uptrennd’s 24 Days of Celebrations started last week, this week they hosted an Escape Room contest and Photo contest. The latest $1UP tokenomics update can be seen here. After 11 months, the platform now has 50k users across 177 countries. Wowza! And wicked stats on the engagement metrics as well. Jeff’s interview with Crypto Beadles came out this week.
A few entries for the Uptrennd Photo Contest
Click here and here for the latest District Weekly and Dev Update from District0x. In case you missed this week’s Dapp Digest, you can watch it here. Aragon fans will be in for a treat since it features Aragon Co-Founder Luis Cuende as a special guest. Remember, we had discussed last week that the Shuffle Monster Raffle had crossed a 10k $SHUF pool. Turns out it got to 13k+. Wow! The latest Hydro developer update is a comprehensive roundup from the entire ecosystem. VCC Exchange listed $HYDRO with a $BTC pairing. Hydro’s security tokenisation protocol, Hail, moved to mainnet this week. The team travelled to Boston for MassChallenge Fintech. Hydro will be hosting a Banking-as-a-Service happy hour next week to talk on how they are building solutions in the BaaS space. For starters, don’t forget to read their article on blockchain applications in finance. The team appeared for an AMA with Apache Traders which also featured a 45k $HYDRO giveaway. Digital payments platform VoPay is now partnered with Hydro for end-to-end payment solutions using Hydrogen API and other Hydro tools. Hydro’s smart contract was audited by Callisto and passed their test with flying colours except for one "low severity" issue. The result: "The contract can be deployed". CTO Tim Allard was interviewed by Ethereum Network Nigeria as part of their Ethereum personality chat series. For the latest update on the community explorer Frost, click here. In Pynk’s first guest blog post, community member (or, Pynkster) Alistaire Wallace talks about what the coming year could hold for Pynk and its community of predictors. Check out the transcript of Sentivate’s AMA with tehMoonwalkeR here.
Sentivate’s new office in PA is shaping up quite well
This week at OST was all about the Pepo app: from angel investor Kartik to Rocket NFT’s Alex Masmej joining the platform, accelerator The Fledge using Pepo Conversations to power community-sourced improvements to businesses, Home for the Holidays Challenge to explain crypto/blockchain to relatives (with a total USD 2k in Pepo coins in prizes) and a “best lifehack” bounty posted by Jason on the app. If you’ve missed all SelfKey news from the past month, you can catch up from the November progress report. Also, did you know that the group Legion of Doom which was once considered to be the most capable hacking group in the world was in a long drawn feud with Masters of Deception in what is now known as the Great Hacker War? Learn more info like this from SelfKey’s latest article on hacking groups. Constellation CEO Ben Jorgensen will be speaking at the Crypto 2020 Summit. If you’re attending, make sure to say Hi. Arena Match announced a trading competition on DDEX with 4M $AMGO tokens to be won. Lucky Bluff Poker will be sponsoring next week’s Arena Match Raffle. The latest Harmony update compilation from the whole team can be found here. In the latest Pangea statistics (Harmony’s experimental staking game to test the limits of its tech), the average staking position is 1.8M $ONE with 75% of participants operate nodes themselves while the rest use delegates. Plus, check out the newest upgrades here. Honest Mining announced mainnet support for the native $ONE token swap. $ONE is also in consideration for listing on Binance US. The token was listed on Pionex this week. The Intellishare website registration and login functions will be down next week for a scheduled upgrade. Also, $INE traders make sure to keep a note of WBFex temporarily disabling the $ETH trading pair. Jobchain’s $JOB token got listed on Bilaxy exchange, P2PB2B exchange, SWFT Blockchain wallet and SWOP.SPACE exchange. The project was also given an A+ score by Xangle. Congrats!

And with that, it’s a wrap. See you again soon with another weekly update. Bye!
submitted by abhijoysarkar to ParachuteToken [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Warning: How to Not Get Hacked

Here are a couple warnings indicators I've seen regarding potential hacking.
  1. Don't click random bitcoin links so easily. At best you are likely giving away an IP address that is somewhat personal. At worst you are exposing yourself to zero day exploits from hackers who are quite willing to blow lesser known exploits on bitcoin demographic traffic.
  2. If you have an amount of bitcoin you wouldn't feel comfortable carrying on your person, put it in a paper wallet and ensure you remove all traces of the private key from your computer by overwritting the file rather than just deleting it. http://lifehacker.com/5570042/securely-overwrite-files-with-a-built+in-command-line-trick Side note: Create an offline wallet, turn off all devices on your network except the router, boot into a Live CD environment and create a new wallet and transfer funds and then take that wallet offline as well.
  3. There is no FICA or other insurance if you're holding funds in an exchange or other service. Regardless of two factor authentication, you are literally exposing yourself to a "wild west" situation where robbers can walk away with cash and no one is going to go after them except whoever owned the cash. If its not in a paper wallet with the private key completely removed, and was not generated/used on a computer you KNOW was not compromised at the same time the private key existed on it, its not secure.
  4. Don't underestimate the current state of computer security and what a targetted reconnisance like described in tip 1 can result in. You are likely not a computer security expert even if you do think you "know a lot" about computer security. People will be ruthless to go after bitcoin and we're already seeing that.
  5. I'll also add, don't have bitcoin running or conduct transactions over public networks unless its over VPN. Always assume you are being watched by everyone on public networks without VPN. Even someone viewing encrypted HTTPS traffic to a known bitcoin site is enough to make you a target worthy of special handling.
Any other tips please feel free to share.
submitted by fromayoungoldman to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Technology Could Be Encouraging You to Over-Tip

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 33%. (I'm a bot)
How much do you tip when a merchant uses a mobile payment system like Square? According to this article from NerdWallet, you could be overdoing it if your barista or restauranteur input their own "Recommended" tipping amounts-especially if it's for a seller who you wouldn't normally tip otherwise.
"Tipping inflation is real, and it's coming to a tablet near you," writes Liz Weston.
"Hop in a New York City cab, and the credit card reader will prompt you to leave a 20 percent, 25 percent or 30 percent tip. Get a haircut or a massage, and you may be presented with a screen that has the '25 percent tip' box already checked."
Between credit cards, debit cards, mobile payment apps, and even Bitcoin, it's getting easier than.
"Even in restaurants, where customers used to leave a cash tip or a signed credit card receipt on the table, waiters may be swiping cards at the diners' elbows and presenting them with 'add a tip' screens."
Have you noticed this too? And if so, how much are you tipping?
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: tip#1 card#2 percent#3 credit#4 mobile#5
Post found in /technology.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

I made a simple blockchain project and now wrote this guide for entrepreneurs interested in smart contracts

The following is the exact copy of my medium article. No need to go there if you prefer reddit. And please ignore my startup mentioned here. I spent a whole month writing this huge guide - it's far beyond a mere promotion. This post is about Ethereum blockchain. I do love it.
As I'm an entrepreneur myself (with some humble programming skills) I think I managed to explain clearly the practical side of Ethereum smart contracts - what can be done and how. Think this sub is the best place for it. Hope you'll find this helpful.
Will do my best to answer all your questions (please mind the time difference - I'm in Russia).

An entrepreneur, programmer and user walk into a smart contract - The ultimate Ethereum blockchain stratup guide.

Lifehack - you don't need to understand blockchain to build a smart contract startup.

I made my smart contract project and still feel as a total noob reading discussions on blockchain. There is so much to learn for me. But, hey, my project works! Why bother? Though blockchain is cool and it's cool to understand the technology, there is no need to understand everything.
Take a look at smart contracts from an entrepreneurs point of view - focus on how you can benefit from it. What kinds of projects you can actually do? What business models are there? What an MVP would look like? What it takes to engage a user, find a programmer and build infrastructure?
This guide with examples and exercises will show you the practical side of smart contracts and help you estimate your idea or generate a new one. Use it as a starting point for your further investigation.

What you do need to know about blockchain and what you may just skip

Mining. The first thing to skip. From an entrepreneur's point of view mining is more like playing the stock market - buy equipment, analyze reward price charts and decide which crypto currency to invest your computing power to. But if you are dealing with smart contracts, you don't have to care about mining for the same reason you don't care about Internet providers when visiting a web-site.
Blocks, hashes, cryptography and all that math - we gonna ignore it too. The important practical outcome can be reduced to this mantra: "Everything that gets into blockchain remains there forever, anything can be verified, but nothing can be changed". In practice it means that data is stored permanently, transparently and securely.
Now let's turn to the terms you cannot do without and explain them as if it's year 2005 now.
Blockchain is like a BitTorrent network. A program on your computer downloads files and afterwards gives them away. But the program is called blockchain client rather than torrent client. And those files you download store transactions instead of videos and music. Sender, recipient, date-time and ammount - records are stored one after another (yes, they are stored in blocks, but who cares). Everybody who runs blockchain client has his own copy of the whole blockchain database and keeps all transactions that have ever been made. This database is huge. Ethereum blockchain is currently about 43 GB, Bitcoin is 125.78 GB. todo
Cryptocurrency is a list of money transfers. In blockchain world your balance is not just a single record, but the sum of all your receipts and expenditures (the entire transactions history). If a blockchain stores transactions which only contain money transfers (sender address, recipient address and amount being sent), we call this type of blockchain a cryptocurrency. Bitcoin - is a cryptocurrency. But any transaction is just a string in a file, thus it may contain any information. An address in turn may not belong to a human... which gives us much wider opportunities then just a crypto currency.
Smart contract is like a web site. A blockchain address may belong to a program. A program then is called a smart contract. It is called a contract just because the code is open. However it is simpler to compare it to a web site (or web service). For example, a classified advertisements service could be a smart contract. Its code would be stored at a particular address in the blockchain - just like a web site url. A transaction to this address would not contain money but an advertisement text. And the smart contract would publish this advertisement, i.e. saves to blockchain.
Ethereum is like the Internet Ethereum - is exactly the kind of blockchain in which transactions may contain not only money, but data. The blockchain database (those files one downloads) stores transactions between people, transactions involving smart contracts and contracts source codes. This makes Ethereum kinda new type of the Internet, which is stored locally by everyone involved.
And that's really enough for the theory. The rest you'll learn from what it all means in practice.

What is the difference between a smart contract and a conventional web site

What are the advantages (and disadvantages) of a smart contract driven service.

Openness and Encryption

A user doesn't have to trust you. "Everything that gets into blockchain remains there forever, anything can be verified, but nothing can be changed". The user sees exactly how your system works (smart contract code is open) and stays confident in the reliability of your database (database is transparent and unchangeable). Meaning there is no need to win users trust.
For example, you can turn a classified advertisements service into an open auction with charity donations. The process of selling would look as follows. A seller sets the initial price and posts a lot. After that anybody will be able to track bets, see a winner, see how much seller earned and how much was deducted to charity and to platform commission. Everybody is confident there was no cheating.
Where it benefits most. Gambling (Roulethvdice.io), prediction markets (Augur, Gnosis), voting, multilevel marketing (TheMillionEtherHomepage).

Payment processing "out of the box"

You don't have to deal with any payment processing services. Solidity language with which smart contracts are written incorporates all the necessary money (Ether cryptocurrency) operators. User balance is just another variable in your code. You can program any behavior to it - like triggering an event on receiving a certain amount of money or making a multisignature payment and much more. That is why Ether and other cryptocurrencies are often referred to as programmable money.
Where it benefits most. Crowdfunding platforms (Weifund, Wings.ai), rent services Golem - rent unused CPU/GPU cycles.

Decentralization

You don't have to worry about DoS attacks and scalability. Every blockchain user has it's own smart contract copy locally on his computer, thus it will withstand any load, free of charge.
Where it benefits most. Smart contracts gave rise to a totally new kind of companies - decentralized organizations (DAOs). DAO is a separate phenomenon worth studying. In the meantime, just ask yourself: "Why do we need an intermediary like Uber, if it is possible to connect a driver and a passenger through a smart contract directly?". What prospects does it opens? Have a look at this startups: Arcade city and Lazooz.
Lifehack: When googling for A DAO, ignore the hassle around THE DAO). The only reason THE DAO failed was braking some basic smart contract safety rules (we'll discuss them further).

Transaction delay and commission

A user have to pay for every transaction and have to wait a bit too. The average transaction is mined (read included) into Ethereum blockchain in 14-15 seconds. There is a high chance of reducing this delay down to 4 seconds in the near future. But even then we are all got used to a better responsiveness. Moreover a simple money transfer (two addresses involved, no contracts, minimal amount of data) would cost about 0.000861 ETH ($0.02 in March 2017). These "drawbacks" are tiny, but enough to build a heavy threshold for certain types of projects.
Where it doesn't benefit. A chat for example. Each message chips a couple of weis (Ether denomination) off your balance and requires half a minute to reach the other end. This is probably a bad idea for a startup unless you are dealing with some official correspondence, which requires legal force and does not require privacy.
With smart contracts you can choose almost any web service and make it blockchain. Plus you are free to create completely new blockchain-only types of projects. See what has already been done, mix it up with Internet of things, artificial intelligence, virtual worlds or fintech, and you'd most probably get a unicorn.
Note: You can make a smart contract with Bitcoin too, but it's like doing 3D in MS Excel. Kinda possible, but why?

What business models are there

You are free to use any business model. But first have a look at what have already become a new standard in Ethereum - tokens.
In conventional terms tokens business model is like crowdfunding and IPO combined. The "crowd" buys shares of your company instead of products. And in the future the shares (tokens) may be sold or exchanged for your services.
This became possible because Solidity (Ethereum smart contract language) allows issuing your own cryptocurrency.
For example. You came up with a classified advertisement platform idea. You want it to have its own internal currency (tokens) called Advertisement (ADV). You want to charge 1 ADV for placing an advertisement, 2 ADVs for pinning it to the top and 0.2 ADVs for updating. You write a smart contract. All that it is capable of at this point is receiving money (ETH) and keeping users balances.
Now you announce your platform in a way that crowdfunding projects usually do and offer to buy ADVs at low cost 1 ADV = 1 ETH. Later when your platform is live you'll set the ADV price to 10 ETH. After that those who invested in the very beginning will be able to sell their ADVs gaining income or place their ads 10 times cheaper than the current price. But for now you've earned your ETH to spend on development.
Tokens are attractive enough on their own to start experimenting with smart contracts.

What it takes to engage a user

Ok. You published your first smart contract. But what it takes to engage a user with no blockchain experience to use it? And how can we lower the threshold?
We can break user experience into two parts: interacting with blockchain (what a user has to do anyway) and interacting with your smart contract (ways we can make a user's life easier).

Interacting with blockchain

What a user has to do anyway.
Get an address (a wallet). An address and a key to it is like username and password. There is no way to interact with blockchain without it. The easiest way to get it is to use generator at MyEtherWallet.com. It takes less than one minute and as a result, user receives an address and a key. The address is a 42 character sting and the key is a small file. The key file is used to sign transactions and has to be saved as securely as possible - there is no way to restore it. A user can use the same address to interact with any smart contract.
IMG: Generate a wallet at MyEtherWallet.com
Get some ether (ETH). Any transaction requires commission (0,001 to 0,01 ETH on average). A user has to fuel up his address with a sufficient sum to interact with your contract. Buying ether is possible through major exchanges. These exchanges require 1-3 day for identity approval and are available in a limited list of countries. Users from other countries and those not eager to wait (especially when buying Ether worth a couple of bucks) may use almost instant alternatives.
Look and feel exercise: generate a wallet and send some Ether to it.
Access a blockchain client. Any interaction with blockchain and with any smart contract accordingly is done through a blockchain-client.
As of March 2017 downloading Ethereum database to an HDD disk (70% are still using HDDs) requires 2-3 days and 43 GB of spare space. It makes computer unresponsive enough to start throwing things at it. Keeping blockchain in sync too requires about the same amount of resources as watching a movie online does.
Not to confuse the pros. For the sake of simplicity we call EthereumWallet, Mist browser, geth and parity the blockchain client. We are entrepreneurs here, it is only a programmer who should really know the difference.
There is also a so called light client. It doesn't require downloading the database. But it still requires installation and getting hands dirty with manuals. Our target audience is not willing to do it either.
So let's be realistic our target audience will hardly install any blockchain client on their computers. Let's see how we can help.
A necessary and sufficient minimum for a user to start interacting with any smart contract is an address (key file) and a tiny amount of ether on it.

Interacting with your smart contract

We got to simplify user experience with a graphical user interface (GUI). In Ethereum GUIs do not belong to smart contracts and are stored off the blockchain. There are several ways to "attach" GUI to a smart contract. Here are they from the least to the most user-friendly.

Smart contract with no GUI

Users can interact with smart contracts directly, with no GUI at all.
Blockchain client can identify smart contract functions and let user work with it. The client provides auto-generated GUI so a contract looks and feels like a sign-in form of a website. This is a straightforward way of writing to and reading from contract.
IMG: Access contract function through Ethereum Wallet
But we agreed we won't force user to deal with blockchain clients. To set user free from it we can try to offer MyEtherWallet.com (an online client). Contract interaction will look just the same, but there is no need to download or learn anything.
IMG: Access the same function through MyEtherWallet.com
The contract without GUI has to be very well documented. It is also a good idea to make a landing page to display the current state of the contract.
For example, TheMillionEtherHomepage.com displays the state of the underlying contract and offers users to work with it directly giving all necessary instructions. The same setup would likely be a minimum for a classified advertisements smart contract. So the user with no blockchain background would be able to grasp the idea of the service.
Look and feel exercise: Try following sign in instructions for TheMillionEtherHomepage.com (it's free) and see what it is like to use MyEtherWallet.com.
A Smart contract without GUI will do as a minimum viable product

Decentralized application (DApp) - GUI in a browser

In the above example the website doesn't allow writing to the contract being just a representation of its state (it only reads from the contract). To let user interact with your contract (read and write) through your own GUI you gonna need a DApp. DApp is a GUI for your contract in a browser.
A browser can simultaneously connect to the Internet and to a blockchain client. This allows a smart contract to look (and work) just like a conventional web-site. A user will follow a link like http://myClassyAdvertisements.com and see your website in the full beauty of HTML, CSS and JavaScript, then will be prompted to fill ad text and click "publish". The only difference the user will notice is a pop-up offering to select a keyfile on the disk instead of asking for a username-password.
The GUI is taken from the Internet, but transactions are sent to a local blockchain client.
Browser can connect either to full or light blockchain client. We discarded them both. There is a browser with "included" client - the Mist browser. But it is too complex too. The easiest solution is the Google Chrome plugin Metamask which brings all blockchain benefits right into the browser. This is what we want our user to install.
Look and feel exercise: Go to tokens exchange platform Maker Market, then install Metamask Chrome plugin and try Maker Market again. See how metamask brings blockchain functionality to the website.
DApp and Metamask browser plugin make your smart contract look and feel just like a web-site

Mobile application

We can make any GUI for mobile or desktop application and bring any feature to it. But in order to send transactions it has to communicate with a blockchain client too.
The ways to do it without any locally installed client are: embedding a light client right into your application or communicating with a remote blockchain client (see infrastructure section further).
Look and feel exercise: Try installing Jaxx wallet or Free Wallet on your phone.
To engage a user with no blockchain background means to make him get an address, buy a bit of Ether and install your mobile app or Metamask browser plugin.

What it takes to build an infrastructure

Let's turn to even more practical (and technical) parts. First what will you have to buy. From the cheapest to the most expensive setup.

Smart contract with no GUI

Regardless of the way you've implemented the GUI, you need to publish your contract first. Publication of a contract is a transaction too. Commission for it is negligible. If you managed to pay 1 ETH for commission, then your project is larger than the majority of existing ones.
Project documentation may be published for free at readthedocs.com. Or upload instruction videos to youtube.
If you want to display the status of the contract on a web-site the way TheMillionEtherHomepage.com does, you have to develop a back-end that will "listen" to the contract through a blockchain-client. Thus you need a hosting to run your website, blockchain client and your blockchain client "listener".
Before buying a hosting check out Etherscan.io and Infura APIs. These are "remote" blockchain clients which will probably let you build your landing page with pure Javascript and no back-end.

DApp

DApp is just a web page (HTML, CSS, JAvaScript). A simple hosting with no database and frameworks support will probably be enough for a start. Remember your user has to interact through his own client (a local one or Metamask). So introduce a version for those with no access to blockchain (see a paragraph up - make a web-page representing your smart contract status).

Mobile App

For a mobile app you'd probably need a server with a running blockchain client to let your app communicate with the blockhain through it. Or you can embed light client right into your app. Or use Etherscan.io and Infura API. Depends on your features. A more detailed (and more technical) guide is here - Mobile: Introduction

Which developer skills are required

What kind of developers skills you want to search?
First - responsibility, second - patience and third - JavaScript front-end skills. Safety first, because failure price is very high.

Smart contract with no GUI

Ethereum has its own language for smart contracts which is called Solidity.
The language looks very much like JavaScript and simple to learn. But one has to be really really really careful writing smart contracts.
Any contact is open source. Anyone can copy it and quietly experiment with attack options before an actual attack. With no thought out bug fixing strategies, neither address nor contract code can be changed after its publication. If there is a vulnerability and no escape paths, you'll helplessly observe your balance approaching zero. So it was with the ill-fated DAO (remember the life hack - The DAO is just an example of how one shouldn't write smart contracts).
Responsibility. Ethereum community recommends writing smart contract as if it were a firmware for electronics or a financial service (but NOT a web-site). For anyone eager to write smart contacts this official document on safety is a must.

DApp

DApp is HTML, CSS and JavaScript. JavaScript library web3.js provides interaction with blockchain client. A front-end developer will do the job.
Patience You need a patient and curious developer. This is the person to dive deepest into blockchain technology, make raw developer tools work and read through tons of documentation.
Regardless of whether your contract has a GUI or not, you gonna need a JavaScript developer. As it is strongly recommended (no, it is actually a must) to cover close to 100% of smart contract functionality with tests, which are written in JavaScript. Detailed developer guide is here here.

Mobile apps and back-ends

Mobile and desktop applications can be written in any language. Recommendations are the same as for the DApp. To connect your app to a blockchain client (full, light or remote) there are ready-made libraries available. For example, python. To embed a light client, check out geth.

Conclusion

Lifehack: Jump off the cliff and build wings on the way down © Ray Douglas Bradbury.
There are only 368 dapps listed at the official Ethereum dapps list and only one third of them is live. I believe this indicates the lack of understanding, not possibilities. It makes Ethereum a great chance to build a future game changer.
You may get some insights learning technology deeper. It is useful to know many of the underlying concepts of Ethereum and blockchain technology in general. But for the smart contracts and for the start this guide is a enough.
As you've seen there is not much complexity. If you are already dealing with websites and JavaScript all you have to do is pump up your team's responsibility. And if you already have an idea, just give a test flight. And see how high you can go.
Thank you for reading.
submitted by takeshi_reg to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

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